Crosman’s Single-Action Six – another blast from the past

by B.B. Pelletier

A reader asked for information about his Crosman Single-Action Six. Since you guys seem to like oldies, I thought I’d review the gun.

The Single-Action Six, or SA-6 as it was also known, was a .22-caliber CO2 revolver made from 1959 to 1969. It has medium-gray plastic grips that are supposed to simulate stag. It was one of the early Crosman lookalike airguns of which they produced a bundle.


Crosman Single-Action Six was a realistic .22 pellet revolver.
The whole cylinder revolved when the hammer was cocked.

The best and worst of the gun
The best thing about this gun is that the cylinder actually revolves – not just a thin slice of it, like most CO2 revolvers. The chambers were loaded from the front instead of the rear and the pellets were put in tail first. A coiled spring around the cylinder held all six pellets in place until they were fired.

Another nice feature was the weight, which is pretty substantial. Because the gun is all metal, it feels very balanced in your hand.

The CO2 powerlet was installed externally – where the ejector rod housing on a Colt Single-Action Army might be. Because the powerlet is larger in diameter than a Colt ejector housing, Crosman supplied a split piece of matte-finished black plastic tubing to cover up the powerlet when it was on the gun. They also had a fake ejector housing in the correct place to complete the disguise.

The worst thing about the SA-6 was its use of gas. While modern CO2 pistols get 45-60 shots per powerlet, the SA-6 gets only 35 good shots on a warm day. Usually, you’re lucky to see shot number 30. At the time this model was contemporary, powerlets were known as leakers. They had bottlecap ends that didn’t seal worth a darn. You’d be lucky to get four out of five to work – in a gun that used them up in no time.

An inexpensive addition to your airgun collection
Crosman made plenty of other revolvers at the time such as the Hahn BB gun, the Crosman model 36 and the Crosman Shiloh. There were also real leather holsters for all these guns. They were very prolific in their day, and none of the Crosman revolvers are particularly hard to find today. An SA-6 in shooting condition is worth about $50, and one that’s new in the box should bring about $100.

If you’re a collector of vintage air pistols, this is a good place to get started with Crosman because the prices are still in the affordable range. In a future posting, I’ll mention some places where you can get these old guns repaired and resealed.

49 thoughts on “Crosman’s Single-Action Six – another blast from the past

  1. I’m doing a science fair project on how the kinetic energy delivered by the pellet decreases as the Carbon Dioxide cartridge is used up. I think it the pistol (its a revolver) is this one, but im not sure what other sites are good?


  2. Actually, velocity does not decrease until all the liquid CO2 in the powerlet has evaporated. CO2 is used as a propellant because it is self-regulating.

    Go to the September 30 posting which is an index of everything I’ve posted and check out some of the other CO2 articles. I recommend “Is airgun barrel length important” from April 4 and “Will a PCP gun function the same if I fill it with CO2?” from April 19.

    Good luck with your project,

    B.B.


  3. Thanks for replying! Sorry about the quality of the last post, I was working at a library, and my time and the computer was about to run out.


  4. Which posts or websites would have the best technical information about how exactly the CO2 cartridges work?
    Yours seem to be the best I’ve found so far.
    Thanks again.


  5. CO2 posts:

    May 3
    May 16
    May 25
    June 21
    June 27
    July 11
    July 19
    August 5
    August 6

    And do a Google search on CO2. The information is very technical, but this is a science project, after all!

    B.B.



  6. Hey! I inherited a Crosman SA6 from my dad and from his, his dad but the seals seam to be…uhhh….not seally so any help on this would be nice

    -Ed


  7. Ed,

    If the leak is slow it may be fixed with a drop of Crosman Pellgunoil on the tip of a fresh powerlet. That fixes 3/4 of the slow leakers. If it’s fast, it needs to be resealed.

    Send it to this guy.

    Rick Willnecker. Contact him at airgunshop@aol.com or call 717-382-1481.

    B.B.




  8. i have an old crossman revolver like the sa-6, but it jammed and someone tryed to pry back the hammer to clear it…and bent the trigger sear…anywhere i can get a new one? and the new seals, if possible







  9. I have a Crosman model SA6 that I am looking to sell. It is used and does have some signs on wear but is in great working condition. A little bit of care could do it wonders. If anyone is interested, I can send a picture, please email me at jrsygrl79@yahoo.com.

    Thanks







  10. Well… I did email him within six hours so maybe I might get lucky.

    I haven’t heard back from him & just emailed him again to let me know if it sold or not, so PLEASE cross your fingers for me.

    There is nothing saying it’s been sold, but you never know.
    You really can’t tell, as you cannot post replies on that site, just send emails to the buyers & sellers.

    That is a great price for it & I’m praying I get it!

    - The BBA -




  11. Update…

    I now have every one of Crosman's old six shooters, from the SA6, both Peacemakers in .177 & .22 cal, the Shiloh, & the Hahn, all in there boxes, with manuals & all. I even have a couple of holsters for them too, along with a large number of Crosman's other classics.

    It took a while to find nice ones at the right price, but it was worth it.

    These are very fun guns & it was just as fun collecting them all.

    They're not the most accurate, but they ARE a lot of fun to shoot, & most importantly, they're a great part of Crosman's history to have in your collection.

    Crosman has SO many great pistols from back in the day to collect, from the notorious 600, to their MK1's & MKII's, 451's, 150's, & their 677 Plink-O-Matic (their BB version of their .22 cal semi auto 10 shot 600. I could go on & on, but the point is, that it is a LOT of fun collecting these old guns, so don't miss out on them, while you buying all the great new ones too.

    Keep in mind though… As cool as the older ones are, you don't want to pass up the new great ones like the Crosman Marauder & ones that have been around but are still in production, like the Air Arms TX200 MkIII, etc.

    TheBBA



  12. B.B.

    I was talking about the Old Western style six shooters, but actually, yes… I have a 38T 6" .177 & a 38C 4" .177 both in the boxes with manuals, etc., & also the .22 caliber versions of each as well, along with the 179 & even the Daisy 1871 commemorative pistol.

    The only six shooter I don't have that I want is the .50 cal model 3357 that shoots paint balls.

    BTW… If you see one in good condition at a fair price, PLEASE grab it for me or let me know.
    I have searches in my auto recon on the auction sites for it, but haven't seen one yet.

    I did just pick up a Schimel GP 22 & a Benjamin 422 too, & I now have Crosman M1's both with the plastic AND one with the wood stock, both in very good condition. I actually have two of each but am selling the two that aren't the ones that are in VG condition, just good.

    And of course the three 451's, one with box & manual, & 677 with box & manual, MK1's & MKII's with boxes & manuals (one even with the leather carrying case, three variants of the 600 with boxes & manuals, but still looking for a Sears variant in god condition, but I do have a number of MK1's, MKII's, & 600's in LD's as well, including a Troy Adams .25 cal MK1, & even an AIR17 converted to CO2, along with a stock one in the box, two Z-77's in the clam shell packs, four 1100's one NIB with manual & all, two skeet launchers, original boxes of skeet & shot shells for them, & the model 76 reloading kit too, along with a Farco, even a Crooked Barn shot pistol that shoots the 1100 shot shells, & I did wind up getting that BB Gatling gun too.

    I could go on & on, but you know me & what i like. LOL

    I have over 100 pieces, so I'm getting there. ;)
    Now I just need a couple more pistols & then I'll be focusing on the high end spring rifles like the Air Arms 200 & such. My B-40 is nice, but I want the really nice ones.

    With the exception of my six PCP's that I have, I'm going for the expensive stuff now. ;)

    TheBBA



  13. B.B.

    FYI… It all started with a comment YOU made about 2 years ago, that I'll never forget.

    "Once you have one, you'll know what everyone else knows. The Crosman 600 is the best pistol they ever made!"

    Do you remember how you had to tell me to cool my heals, because I HAD to have one yesterday? LOL

    I'm pretty sure I drove you nuts with all my questions on them, but
    once I got my first 600, I SAID WOW!

    And then I was off to the races!
    :D

    Getting all the inexpensive ones first (to build a large collection without breaking the bank), & then moving up to the more expensive pieces, & am continuing in that fashion. Like I said. I'm now moving up to the high end springer rifles now.

    It's all your fault!
    ;)

    One correction though… I said I had a 179… That's a Daisy. It's actually a Crosman Frontier 36.

    So, other than that elusive .50 cal Crosman 3357… I have just about every six shooter I want.

    BTW… I'm almost done inventorying all my airguns. (I wrote down all the serial numbers just in case they ever got stolen God forbid), so I'll have a list for you to look at soon & tell me what you think, & what I'm missing that I should consider.

    BTW… While I love my P1, my P11 in .22 cal is not half bad either.
    I don't know why PA doesn't carry it?

    Any ways, just think. That one comment of yours got me back into a hobby I once loved that I forgot all about.

    I've only been collection for 2 years now, but I have learned SO much & have had almost 200 airguns. (I've both bought & sold.)

    So B.B. thank you for getting me back into a hobby I love, & helping me learn things I would have never learned with out your help.

    HEY! That just gave me an idea!
    I think it might be fun starting a thread about how the regulars on this blog got started collecting airguns.

    What do you think?

    ThaBBA


  14. I have a crossman plink-o-matic bb pistol that my father had. I don't know anything about it. could someone help me with some info on this gun. thanks…..Phil


  15. Hi BB. I love your blog! What groupings can you get with the SA6? What is the maximum effective range and what is the fps of this gun?
    Sorry for all the questions but I'm really interested in this gun now =).
    Thanks in advance.

    Josh


  16. Hi Anonymous,

    I don't have the answer to your question, but I can help you. You posted to a blog written 5 years ago. There are just a handful of us checking the older blogs for new comments.

    You need to repost your question on the current blog which can be found at http://airgun-academy.pyramydair.com/blog/.

    B.B. writes this blog dailf Mon-Fri where you'll reach a reading audience of thousands of people and I am sure someone out there can answer you question. Please come and join us. I'd like to hear about your experience with your SA6.

    Mr B.


  17. Josh,

    The SA-6 is not an accurate air pistol. I would expect groups of 1.5 inches at 10 yards. That would be the max effective range, since you can't hit anything much farther.

    The velocity with medium-weight .22 caliber pellets is in the 350 f.p.s. range.

    B.B.



  18. player,

    In excellent original condition and working of course, a SA-6 in the box might bring $125 at an airgun show. An average working gun with no box will still bring $80 in working condition. A non-working beater is worth $25-35, depending on condition.

    B.B.



  19. Bob,

    you've posted to a blog that is 5 years old. Only a handful of us monitor these old blogs for comments. First, I suggest you re-post to the current blog. Off-topic comments are always welcome and you get way greater exposure. The current blog can always be found at:

    http://airgun-academy.pyramydair.com/blog

    Second, try this gentleman, he may be able to help you:

    John Groenewold, PO Box 830, Mundelein, IL 60060-0830, (847) 566-2365
    http://www.jgairguns.biz

    If not, repost as I suggested above. Good luck.

    Fred PRoNJ


  20. Hey B.B.
    What brand and type of pellets do you recommend for use in the Crosman SA6? Also, how come some of them have dark gray grips while others have the white/brown grips like the Hahn 45 does?


  21. Try Hobby pellets in the SA-6 and also the cheapest Premiers you can find.

    I don't know about the grips except that a former owner could have changed them at some time. They didn't come with that color, as far as I know.

    B.B.


  22. Hey B.B.
    Which pellets work best in the SA6? How come some of them have dark gray grips while others have the white and brown ones?
    Thanks.



  23. Hey BB, I'm really interested in these vintage guns. Can you do another article on the Crosman SA6 please? I noticed that some SA6s have dark gray grips while others have stag-like white and brown ones. Where the grips changed to designate a new version of the gun?
    Thanks.


  24. HEY!!!

    I have now answered this comment three different times!! The SA-6 did not come with any grips but gray and white. The other grips were put on later by owners.

    I don't have an SA-6 on hand to do another report, but I will keep it in mind.

    B.B.


  25. Hi, my father has a P.Y Hahn 45 BB Single action revolver. He is looking for parts for it. He needs the plastic bottom cover and the screw in wheel for the CO2 cartridge. He also needs the gasket for the CO2 cart. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I have no idea where to look, just stumbled across this site. Thank you,

    Tammy


  26. Tammy,

    Good job finding this blog!

    The parts your father needs can only come from old parts guns that someone might have. The plastic cover is probably a lost cause, because they just didn't last. Those that exists are in collections. The gun doesn't need one to function, anyway.

    The captive screw with thumbwheel that was used to pierce the CO2 cartridge might still be available from a repair station. The seals are always available. Here are two repair stations to inquire from:

    John Groenewold, PO Box 830, Mundelein, IL 60060-0830, (847) 566-2365
    http://www.jgairguns.biz

    Ron Sauls
    http://www.bryanandac.com/
    864-261-6810

    B.B.





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