Daisy Avanti 747: The perfect indoor target pistol

by B.B. Pelletier

Okay, today, it’s official. Christmas is just a month away! Time to start getting serious about that special present you want. Over the past months, I’ve talked about a lot of airguns, but today I want to show you a very special target pistol that’s made right here in the good old U.S. of A.: the .177-caliber Daisy Avanti 747.


I borrowed this picture from Pyramyd’s website because I like the look of the pistol! Pumping it is nearly effortless.

These pistols are quiet
This is a single-stroke pneumatic, which means it fires using compressed air and can only be pumped one time. Many single-strokes are hard to pump, but the 747 is one of the easy ones. The pump handle is so long that the compression stroke is almost effortless. The gun compresses a tiny amount of air – just enough to get the pellet up to speed for target shooting at 33 feet (10 meters) but no more. Because of that, THIS PISTOL IS VERY QUIET! It’s quiet enough to shoot in an apartment with thin walls and nosy neighbors. I used to shoot mine in my office at work!

They’ re accurate, too!
With a 747, it’s possible to hit an asprin at 33 feet. You don’t need to see the aspirin to hit it – just tape it to the 10-ring of a target and do your thing. I have actually done this in front of witnesses (which is the best time do do such things). Of course, the real trick is hitting the 10-ring. With a 747, you can be sure the gun isn’t holding you back.

The barrel is a Lothar Walther, which airgunners recognize as one of the best. Shooting as slow as this gun does, you never need to clean the barrel or give it a second thought. Just feed it good pellets and enjoy shooting!

What about pellets?
This is one time I will have to differ with Pyramyd Air over the choice of ammunition for a gun. They show Crosman Premiers and Daisy Max Speed pellets for the 747, but I would choose something else. This is a pure target pistol, and it needs wadcutters to punch perfectly round holes in paper targets. One of the best inexpensive target pellets I have used in these Daisys is the Gamo Match pellet. It appears very uniform and always produces great results for me.

Don’t forget targets
The only target on this site that is suitable for 10 meter pistols is Gamo’s paper target. Ten-meter pistol targets have much larger bulls than 10-meter rifle targets, so be sure you get the right ones! If you don’t already have a pellet trap for hanging targets, get the Daisy 850 pellet trap. Just don’t use this trap for magnum airguns; it’s ideally suited to guns like the 747.

The 747 is for adults – and not all of them!
I must make you aware that the 747 is an adult-sized air pistol. It’s not for your 12-year-old who can handle a 20 gauge shotgun. This is a large air pistol that takes a strong hand to hold. If you want something similar but lighter, take a look at the Gamo Compact. Although the weight is not that much less, the Compact is shorter, so the weight rests in your palm. The 747 is decidedly muzzle-heavy, which is great for target shooting, but it takes some strength to control. The Compact, on the other hand, is much harder to pump!

If you’re an airgunner who likes the quietness of the guns and the shorter ranges at which they can be enjoyed, the Daisy 747 is an ideal air pistol for you to consider and should be on your short list for Christmas!

74 thoughts on “Daisy Avanti 747: The perfect indoor target pistol

  1. I agree. I have been happy with my 747 which I shoot it in the basement. However, the guns lousy grips do detract from my overall impression of it.



  2. 747 grips!

    Yes, I should have included a comment about them. They should have a flare at the bottom to hold the hand but they don’t. I had a 777 which did have the flare, but other than that, they weren’t much better. Aftermarket grips seem to be the only solution.

    B.B.



  3. hi, i had a marksman spring no co2 pistol and it made to much noise is the 747 quieter than the marksman? i live in a apt. thats why i’am wondering. thanks, mike please write


  4. I’m confused as to which Marksman pistol you had. You first said it was a spring pistol, which would be some variation of the 1010. That gun is the quietest airgun known!

    Then you said it was a CO2 pistol. I’m not aware of a Marksman CO2 pistol. They do sell a single-stroke pneumatic called the 2004, and it would be somewhat noisy. Is that the gun you are referring to?

    The 747 is one of the quietest airguns made. As I said in the article, it is quiet enough to use in an apartment.

    More than half the noise from a pellet gun comes from the pellet striking the backstop. If you use a Crosman model 850 pellet trap, you will eliminate all the noise.

    B.B.


  5. Actually Marksman did make a strange gun called the 2001 that was co2 powered. It had a 8 round magazine that rotated when you used used a slide that was under the barrel. It was black and white and looked weird. It had no power, was inacurate and difficult to use.


  6. DJ,

    Thanks! I never heard of that gun (the 2001), but I did find a 2004 that has to be CO2 because of the velocity – 410 f.p.s.

    Live and learn.

    B.B.


  7. The 2004 is a single pump pneumatic pistol, in.177. It has a great trigger, is powerful, and accurate. The 2001 is hard to find as they are not of much use or value



  8. Do you know of anyone who supplies aftermarket wood grips for the Avanti? It seems RB grips does not. Also, are there any plastic parts on this gun, other than the grips?


  9. No, I’m not aware of anyone offering wood grips for the 747. I would have suggested RB Grips, so I’m glad you told me he doesn’t make them.

    The problems is, there is not much demand for 747 wood grips, so any maker who does make them is likely to be a hobbiest. They come and go over the years, and it’s had to know who is doing what at any given time.

    Don’t give up hope. There may be someone out there right now with the very grips you need and he’s trying hard to figure out how to find you!

    I suppose you have already contacted Daisy’s Customer Service about a set of 777 grips? They are wood, you know.

    B.B.




  10. I am looking for an air pistol for my 11 year old daughter to compete in Tetrathalon. Trigger pull is a minimum of 500 grams and the maximum total weight ready to shoot is 1500 grams. The air pistol with all accessories mut fit into box with inside dimensions of 420mmlong x 200 mm wide x 50 mm deep. Does anyone have a recommendation on the best pistol?


  11. What you are looking for is properly called a 10-meter pistol. They are used in World Cup and Olympic competition.

    Your daughter will need a lightweight pistol, because of her age. I have tested the Benelli Kite and believe it would be good for her. Dennis Quackenbush sells them and I believe they retail for a little over $800, which is about half what most of the top guns cost. You can find his website through a Google search.

    If your daughter could cock it, the Gamo Compact is a much less expensive gun and very light, besides. It has the accuracy you need, but I would think it’s too difficult for her to cock. It’s a single-stroke pneumatic which means it meads one pump of air from the built in pump. The Benelli is a precharged gun that is filled from a scuba tank or a hand pump.

    The Daisy 747 that you read about in this blog is too heavy for a little girl. Some men find it heavy. It is easy to pump, however.

    The Russian IZH 46M found on the Pyramyd Air website is easy enough for your daughter to pump, but also too heavy for her to hold.

    Other junior-sized 10-meter pistols cost above $1,000, so I have not recommended them.


  12. My 747 won’t shoot a pellet until I “condition” the gun by pumping, cocking, and firing 4 or 5 times without a pellet! Initially, it doesn’t have the “oomph” to fire a pellet unless I do the “priming”.

    Any comments (or help) would be appreciated———-D.G.



  13. One month———-the gun “acted” this way when new;it probably doesn’t have 500 shots on it. When it is working, it is great but thats after it is “warmed-up”.

    —————–D.G.



  14. Yes. It appears to be right-on with the manual. I understand that Daisy has improved on the valve metering system pertinent to the 747. Could I be “suffering” from a faulty system prior to the improvement?


  15. 747,

    If you’ve oiled the pump head recently and also adjusted it, you have done everything you can. I suggest you refer the problem to Daisy.

    That said, please listen to this. Pumping and shooting several times before a single stroke builds pressure is a very common thing. I have to do it with my IZH 46. The pump head may be a little hard (durometer rating) and sitting for a long time, it may take a set. Automobile tires used to have flat spots if they were parked in one spot for a week. You’d feel the bumps until the tires warmed up.

    So you can send it in or you can do what most single stroke shooter do and warm up the gun with several dry-fires each time you shoot.

    B.B.


  16. Thanks for your lucid commentaries. The 747 is really a great shooting gun; I get great accuracy from the gun comparable with my Steyr LP-10 and my Falcon FN-8. I guess that I’m too much of a perfectionist———D.G.



  17. The 747 is a wonderful gun. I have had match pistols costing ten times as much as the 747, and they would not outshoot this gun. dont be put off by its price, this gun is a winner.




  18. Hi BB.
    I enjoy the Reports you do on different guns. I have a Daisy 747 pistol, And I was wondering, if it is a good idea to put a drop of crosman pellgun oil in the chamber hole just inside the barrel once in a while.
    Thanks
    JG






  19. The HB22 is a lot noisier than the Daisy 747. The 747 is exceptionally quiet. It seems to use all the air before the pellet exits the muzzle, making it one of the quietest air pistols around.

    The HB22 is on the noisy side of the sound spectrum for air pistols.

    B.B.


  20. Scope options for the 747?
    I read that B-Square’s scope mount for the IZH 46M Match pistol works well but am confused about scopes. I see on some sights they suggest a rifle scope for the 747 using a tight(revers taco) hold on the scope. I have tried this and it is surprizingly comfortable but seems like the eye relief would be an issue(esspecially if you ever wanted to shoot with arms extended). Do you think the BSA 2×20 pistol scope would work well for hitting asprin size targets at 28′? Thanks



  21. Mounted the scope!!! I know your not a fan of scopes on pistols and unless they are a red dot on a race gun, I usually pass on them aswell. However, my 747 is so accurate with iron sights, I had to add a scope to see its potential. At 30 feet using beeman silver bear pellets, I can hit the head of a match 4 out of five times. I want to find a long indoor hallway to see what kind of accuracy I could get at extended range dimes at 25 yards anyone.” Anyway, thanks for your blog and turning me on to this gem of a pistol with or without a scope. I was curious, what would you consider the best indoor precision air rifle with the qualities similiar to the 747. Namely, accuracy, quality, quietness, value, and ability to mount a scope. I’m an appartment dweller looking to do some quite percision shooting with a rifle as well suited for the purpose as my 747 pistol.
    Thanks-
    E



  22. Thanks B.B.-
    I was leaning that way but was discouraged by some reports of the new modles being kind of shoty. Will it’s tiny base take a scope? Guess I could mount a pistol scope on the barrel and have a scout rifle but I really want to mount a bug buster to really see what kind of accuracy I can get. Anyone out there recently snipered-up IZH 61?


  23. BB:

    You said “The 747 is decidedly muzzle-heavy, which is great for target shooting.” I’m trying to wrap my head around that. The problem I am having with my Gamo Compact is keeping the front sight from fluttering as I aim. I would have thought a heavy muzzle would be worse. Is it the opposite then?

    For my indoor 25 foot range how would you rate the 747 vs the Daisy 2300S? I was very interested in the 2300S based on your blogs until your mention of problems with wadcutters. My pellet of choice for my guns at this time is the Gamo Match.


  24. Rabbitt,

    No, a heavy muzzle settles the flutter down. The light weight of the Compact is my one complaint of the gun. However, I can shoot it very well after some practicing, so hang in there. Don’t you LOVE the trigger?

    The Daisy 747 is a 10-meter target pistol while the Crosman 2300s is more of a silhouette pistol (longer range). At 10 meters it will be difficult to tell them apart.

    I understand that Crosman has redesigned the breech of the gun so it doesn’t have the loading problem I described.

    B.B.


  25. BB:

    Thanks so much for explaining that. Also about the breech redesign.
    Love, love, love the trigger of the Compact. I have mine adjusted slightly to the right and it feels great. Bit hard to remember the light pull after shooting say the Crosman 3576 or especially the CP Sport. The Compact tends to fire a bit too soon then. Yeah, yeah. That’s my fault and not the gun’s. :-)


  26. BB:
    I enjoy your blogs. I have a Daisy 747. Every time I shoot with an RWS pellet(8.2 grains wadcutter) the breech opens up despite being cocked and the pellet doesn’t reach the target. When I shoot with Gammo Match pellet, I have trouble cocking the pellet as the pellet seems to be too big. The Daisy wadcutters and Crossman Premier seem to work perfectly. Any idea why cocking seems to be difficult with other pellets?

    Regards,

    Jai


  27. Jai,

    I suspect that your bolt O-ring may need replacing. It’s supposed to stop the bol;t from rotating when the gun is fired, but if it’s missing or damaged, it may not be doing its job.

    The difficult loading may be dure to the same thing, or the pellet skirt may not be long enough to pass the transfer port.

    Come to think of it, if the bolt nose is worn down, it could cause this problem, also.

    B.B.


  28. BB.

    Im thinking of buying a pistol fo target shooting from 10 meters to 30 yards. Any suggestions? i was thinking of the 747, IZH 46M and weihrauch hw75M.
    my priorities would be:
    1- accuracy/ease of shooting.
    2- power
    4-trigger
    5- price

    thanks

    Chuck


  29. Chuck,

    The choice is between the HW and the IZH, and the IZH wins on power and price. The HW wins on compactness, only.

    The Daisy is too slow to shoot target beyond 10 yards.

    B.B.


  30. B.B.-

    I just had the opprtunity to utilize the 75′ hallway in my inlaw’s home to put the 747 to the test. In my appartment, with the 2x scope mounted, I can shoot virtual one hole groups when I fire from a rested postion at 30 feet. So i was very curious what would happen at 25yards. The quick answer is, not much. Although I had to add a few clicks elevation wise, the 747 still put five beeman Siver Bears (it’s favorite) in a tight cloverleaf. Granted this was from a soild benchrest in near test tunnel conditions so I don’t know what a bit of wind would do. However, for “indoor airpistol benchrest competion”, its a great choice :)
    E



  31. B.B. I’m just amazed by the accuracy and decided to do a little penetration test to see what potential terminal ballistics the silver bear would have at 25 yards. The only medium I had available was thick aloe leaves and the pellets zipped through over an inch and a half of fleshy material and continued through several layers of paper bags until it stopped in the towel backstop. Maybe enough penetration for tiny pest birds but perfect for sniping bugs. Talk about satisfaction. Imagine sniping a fly with an air pistol at 75′. I’m don’t know the equation exactly but that has to be like shooting a deer at 1200 plus yards, mathmaticly speaking.
    E


  32. I went ahead and purchased a Daisy 747 after all the positive comments from here as well as all over web. For less than a hundred and thirty bucks, you cannot find a better one. Lothar Walther match barrel, adjustable trigger, nice fit and finish, and makes a bad shot like me look good. I’m so bad i make cheap pellets shoot good. Actually I shot Daisy 7.1gr Max Speed wad cutters, Daisy 7.5gr Precision Max wad cutters, and Crosman 7.9gr competition wad cutters. I give the edge to Daisy Max with Crosman second followed by Daisy precision Max. But, like the NFL, that could change on any given day. All in all, the Daisy 747 is truly a bargain in my book.


  33. I am curious how “E” mounted a scope on the 747. Does anyone make a scope base for this gun? How difficult would it be to mount a Red Dot on it?

    Thanks, Milrose


  34. I would like to get the Daisy 747, I read on hear someone got it for 130 bucks, where is the best place to buy it at?
    Thanks,
    John



  35. B.B.
    Finally received my daisy 747(was on backorder)! It’s a very nice gun for $155! The front sight needs some paint accent work, and I’ll but some RB wood grips for it. I’m very pleased with the 747 for lack of noise, ease of pellet loading, ease of cocking effort, trigger! Wish I had one of these bad boys as a kid thats for sure….


  36. I got the 747 about a week ago and I’ve shot about 200 pellets through it. It’s everything the reviews promised, great to shoot, accurate, quiet. However, every time I shoot it my middle finger goes numb. Has this happened to anyone else with either this gun or another? It doesn’t happen when I shoot my Beretta 92FS. Thanks!



  37. BB,

    After reading your post I bought a 747, amazing pistol for the price!

    One silly question, in the manual says that you must compress the air with the bolt open, I did it many times with the bolt closed (after cocking of course).

    Can I have damaged anything? I believe is just the same, but I better ask to an expert!

    Thanks!

    José Luis



  38. B.B.,

    you mentioned in a q&a following your review of the Daisy Avanti 747 that shooters sometimes warm up their guns with several dry-fires before shooting with pellets. so dry-fires won't hurt this particular pistol?

    L


  39. L,

    You can dry-fire the 747 all you want. But there are two ways to do it. If you want to warm up the gun for shooting, cock it and them pump it. That dry-fire will exercise the valve, which gets it ready to shoot.

    If you just want to practice with the trigger, just cock the gun and fire. No air will be expelled, but the trigger will feel the same as if the gun in being fired.

    B.B.


  40. BB,

    It sounds as though the 747 would NOT be a good silhouette pistol. Other than the 2300S (or 2300T?), what are my .177 options?

    I will use it for fun, not competition. I’d like to be able to practice inside and avoid CO2, if possible. Are there any pistols you’d recommend for close-in field target?

    Are the Beeman P3 or Crosman 1377C viable?

    I plan on getting an HW50S and would like something to supplement it. Would you recommend the IZH 46M or 61?

    Thanks,
    George


  41. George,

    Actually, there are shooters who do use the 747 for silhouette. How effective it is can’t say.

    The IZH 46 is much better-suited to airgun silhouette, so maybe that answers all your other questions?

    A 1377 would certainly be good for field targets out to 25 yards or so. The P3 is a little light for them past about 10 yards.

    B.B.


  42. BB,

    That helps.

    It seems you view the 1377C as an all-around pistol. Is it as effective as the CO2 pistols (with less noise)?

    Do you see the 46M as suited to field target as well?

    I thought that the P3 was highly regarded. Not for these applications?

    Are there pistols that I should be considering?

    Thank you.
    George


  43. George,

    The 1377 will be slightly louder than a CO2 gun because it is more powerful.

    Since nobody shoots field target with pistols I don’t know how to answer that question. Field target is a rifle game.

    The P3 is highly regarded. It just has less power and you will need all the power you can summon to operate field targets with pistols.

    Yes, look at the Beeman P1. It’s a great gun and in the same power range as the others.

    B.B.


  44. B.B.,

    Last questions-
    In YOUR opinion which would be the best pistols (any propulsion system) @ these price points: <$100, $100-$200; $200-$300; $300-$400.

    The criteria are: accuracy to 18 yards; noise level; ease of use and durability.

    Not having the opportunity to see these pistols first-hand I have to rely on your expert opinion and those of your readers.

    Thank you,
    George



  45. B.B.,
    I hope that you are feeling better.

    Since my last post I have been doing some more research and can narrow down my request.

    Using the criteria of accuracy to 20 yards (for informal silhouette); noise level (outdoor and indoor use); ease of use and durability, how would you rank the following options:
    Crosman 1377c; Crosman 2300T and S, and IZH-46M?

    I realize that their prices vary considerably.

    George


  46. George,

    You are still trying to ask too much. But I will try to answer this question, since you keep on asking it.

    The 2300S and T are almost identical guns, so noise and reliability are going to be the same.

    The 1377 is all-plastic, but it can last if you do the right things. Do you know what they are? Always keep a pump of air in the gun and lube the pump head with Crosman Pellgunoil.

    The 2300 S and T will both have to be maintained like all CO2 guns. Do you know how to do that? Always put a drop of Crosman Pellgunoil on the tip of each new powerlet you pierce.

    The IZH 46M is the best-made of all four pistols and also the most accurate, but that doesn’t mean it will last the longest. It is a Russian gun that doesn’t have good support in the U.S., while the other three are Crosmans and entirely rebuildable by you with parts that are readily available.

    So – which is “better,” a gun that lasts longer between rebuilds or one that can be rebuilt easily?

    As far as accuracy at 20 yards, the IZH 46 will shoot rings around the other three guns. The 2300 S and T will be next and the 1300 won’t be far behind them. All these guns will be accurate enough to shoot silhouette, which is not limited to 20 yards, by the way.

    The 46M is the quietest. The 2300 S and T are next, and the 1377 is last. Get the 46M is noise is a problem.

    B.B.



  47. B.B.,
    Enjoying my Daisy Avanti a great deal. Thanks for recommending it. What is the best way to store this pistol: with the air cylinder charged or not?
    Loren

    PS Great nom de plume. I realize the last name “Pelletier” refers to pellets, but it also means “furrier” or “fur trader” in French. I wonder if any of the 17th or 18th century fur traders in the wilds of Canada ever could afford one of the air rifles of the time to take game!


  48. Loren,

    In the specific case of a sing;e-stroke pneumatic, one should never leave the gun under pressure for longer than five minutes. The valve materials are softer than in most pneumatics and they will extrude through the valve.

    I didn’t know the French word for furrier. Thanks! I do know that in the beginning the fur trade was a way to get rich.

    B.B.


  49. I enjoy shooting my 747 (having just started in earnest after mostly ignoring it for about 15 years), and my scores are improving steadily.

    However, I don't much enjoy loading it. I fumble with pellets, get some of them in backwards…

    Is there a method for loading this thing, given that I have big hands and clumsy fingers?

    Thanks,
    Tim


  50. Tim,

    I wouldn't call it a method, so much as a technique. Notice that you can flip the pellets around in the loading trough, just by how you orient the pistol. Use that to your advantage when loading.

    B.B.


  51. Dear BB:

    Bought a 747 two days ago. After shooting, when pulling pump lever to recharge it shoots halfway outwards, hence there is still some compressed air in the cylinder.

    After shooting about 100 times, sometimes, I’d say one out of five, it didn´t do so, but behaved correctly, that is the pump lever wouldn´t shoot out when re-pumping (and after the shot was fired I could hear a hiss of some extra air coming out of the barrel)

    Today I tried it again, and again the pump lever shoots outwards.

    Undoubtedly this doesn´t make sense as the pistol isn´t working efficiently, it surely should use up all the compressed air in the cylinder.

    Another related piece of info: unpumped with the bolt in the firing position, and when moving the lever outward to start the pumping action, the lever wants to stay in its original position (beside the gun), hence there is some kind of vacuum going on in the cylinder, till I take the lever completely outwards, and the o-ring seal is exposed, only then the pistol sucks air.

    Have to guess something is wrong with the valve, which isn´t letting all the air out when fired, and also not letting air in when starting the outward movement of the pump lever.

    Could you be so kind as to let me know your thoughts?

    Thanks a million,
    Fred


  52. Fred,

    Is this gun used, by any chance? I ask that because this gun acts like it is adjusted incorrectly, by someone who has tried to get it to shoot faster than it was designed to shoot.

    I think the pump lever is way out of adjustment. Read this report:

    http://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2005/08/fixing-daisy-avanti-747-i-hope.html

    Then read and follow this report:

    http://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2007/09/daisy-717-part-2.html

    Please let me know if this fixes your gun. I have seen things like this before and it was always this problem.

    B.B.


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