Pellet profile – the JSB Exact domed diabolo

by B.B. Pelletier

Today, I’d like to look at a pellet that many experienced shooters believe is the finest in the world – the JSB Exact domed diabolo.

Who is JSB?
The initials JSB stand for Josef Schulz Bohumin. Josef Schulz started the company in the city of Bohumin in 1992. A former sports shooter, he now trains and sponsors the Sports Shooting Club of Bohumin.

Bohumin is located in the Czech Republic, which has been known for gun-making for more than a century. The Czech city of Brno, second-largest city in the Czech Republic, is as famous as Birmingham or Springfield as an arms-making center.

It’s important to know the name Bohumin because Pyramyd Air lists that name under the manufacturers listing on the main ammo page. If you want to find pellets by their maker, look for Bohumin, not JSB.

Why do shooters say they are the best?
They say that because in many airguns, if not most, a JSB will perform better than any other pellet. It won’t always be the best, but a lot of the time it is. Whenever I have a new gun to test for accuracy, I try to use JSB Exact domed diabolos.

What makes them the best?
The shape of JSB pellets is good and traditional, but it’s nothing other pellet makers haven’t already tried. JSBs are made from pure lead, which slips through rifled barrels much better than a harder alloy – but many other types of pellets are also pure lead. I believe JSB pellets are so good because of the rigorous inspection they undergo before being packed.

Hand-sorting makes a better batch of pellets!
Clear back on March 10, I had a posting titled B.B.’s treasure chest – Sorting pellets for accuracy. In that post, I discussed how sorting pellets according to weight and visually examining them for defects is the champion’s secret weapon. Pellet makers have done this before. The Chinese make a hand-sorted pellet that stands up to the finest target wadcutters anywhere. So, it comes as no surprise that hand-sorting works for Bohumin, too.

Doesn’t hand-sorting add a lot of cost?
Of course! Take the hourly salary of the employee doing the inspection and multiply by a factor of three (for benefits and mandated personnel costs) and divide that figure by the number of pellets that person can sort each hour. Or, pay them by the number of pellets they sort, but watch out that they don’t go so fast that they cancel any benefits gained from sorting. Either way, you’re adding a lot of cost to the price of a pellet. A time will come when this level of attention will be too expensive for any manufacturer.

What about the other shapes they make?
I’m always talking about JSB Exact domed diabolos, but Bohumin makes lots of other pellets. Are they good, too? Yes, they are. The reason I concentrate on the domed pellet is because I’m usually discussing a sporting airgun. When we get into the world of target guns and pellets, Bohumin has a lot of stiff competition from H&N, RWS and some others. But, in the world of domed all-purpose pellets, I believe they are the clear winner – most of the time.

What about Crosman Premiers? How about Beeman Kodiaks?
For a full decade, Crosman Premiers were the undisputed world leader in domed pellets. Nothing could touch them, and I still find guns that shoot Premiers best of all. As for Beeman Kodiaks, they’re pure lead, very heavy and among my top three picks for almost any pellet gun. I say “almost” because, as heavy as Kodiaks are in .177 and .22, they are only good in medium- to higher-powered airguns. In .22 caliber, JSBs are on the heavy side of medium weight. In .177 they are available in two different weights – standard and heavy.

I have recommended JSB pellets for several years – ever since I saw their clear accuracy advantage. They may not be the best pellet in your airgun, but they are worth a try. I buy multiple tins at a time, taking full advantage of Pyramyd Air’s buy three, get the fourth tin free!

22 thoughts on “Pellet profile – the JSB Exact domed diabolo

  1. I’ve got about 6 thousand of them right now. Great pellet. Would be interested In your top three for target though. I see you mentioned H@N and Rws. LEts get spaciffic when you got the time.



  2. The 5.51 and 5.52 mm refers to the diameter of the pellet’s head. Careful shooters will compare different head sizes in their guns to determine which works best. 5.51 is probably the more standard.

    B.B.


  3. GLAD YOU DID THIS POST ON THE JSB’S. A FEW MONTHS AGO I WROTE YOU THAT CROSMAN PEMIERS GAVE BETTER ACCURACY THAN JSB IN MY .22 RWS 350. NOW, AFTER ABOUT 1000 MORE ROUNDS THE JSB’S SHOOT JUST AS WELL IF NOT BETTER. MY ONLY CONCLUSION IS MABY THE RIFLE NOW VIBERAITES MORE IN FAVOR OF THE JSB’S, OR MABY THE BAREL IS MORE POLISHED. THE 8.5 GR. JSB’S SHOOT 3 SHOT GROUPES IN QUARTER INCH HOLES AT 20 YDS. ALMOST EVERY TIME FROM MY WEBLEY TOMAHAWK. I HOPE JSB MARKETS A .20 CAL PELLET.



  4. B.B. WHILE ON THE SUBJECT OF PELLETS, I THOUGHT THIS MIGHT BE OF INTEREST. WHILE IN THE ATTIC OF MY GARAGE I FOUND A OLD CAN OF CROSMAN SUPER PELLS. I KNOW THE LAST TIME I PURCHASED THIS KIND OF PELLET WAS THE EARLY 60′S. I DON’T KNOW HOW LONG AGO CROSMAN STOPED MAKING THESE. THEY WEIGH ABOUT 15 GRS.,AND ARE CRUDE COMPAIRED TO A PREMIER. THE BEST GROUP I GOULD GET AT 20 YDS.WITH MY 350 WAS ABOUT 6 INCHES.



  5. I came across a can of 250/ .22 cal super pells unopened, made in Fairport, New York. It has a Caldor price tag @ .99c Is this of interest to anyone?


  6. Hi there B.B Ive just bought my first air rifle, it’s an Weihrauch HW97K and find this whole business of slecting the right pellet a minefield, somebody also told me that a german .22 is slightly different barrel size to a British .22 so its best to use german pellets, is this correct? Im mainly going to be shooting targets and hopfully move on to actually shooting rabbitts and would really like some advice as a good pellet to start with. Would the JSB diablo be a good pellet for me to start with or something like the Logun Penetrator which i was told by another friend is a great pellet.

    Sorry about the long comment, many thnx Lee.


  7. Lee,

    The bore size differences did make a difference 20 years ago, but not today. However, the Brits don’t really make any quality pellets, except that Logun Penetrator. Anything they would have that’s good comes from either Germany or the Czech Republic.

    Finding the best pellet for the HW97K is not a real challenge. Just try both weights of JSB Exact domed pellets. One will surely be the best. As a backup, try the Beeman Kodiaks and the Logun Penetrators.

    B.B.



  8. Lee,

    I think they’ll be fine. I don’t know where Air Arms buys them, but I do know that a respectable company like Air Arms is not going to put their lable on junk. I bet those pellets do very well.

    B.B.



  9. Peter,

    First, are you using the correct technique? The artillery hold is essential for shooting a breakbarrel. Look here:

    http://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2007/07/artillery-hold.html

    Second,

    Have you cleaned your bore? That is most critical with lower-priced spring air rifles. Look here:

    http://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2006/02/should-you-clean-new-airgun-barrel.html

    Please follow all the links to other posts within that post, because barrel cleaning is very important.

    Finally, let’s not shoot Crosman pointed pellets. Get some Crosman Premier hollowpoints, or get some Benjamin Diabolo domed pellets and try them. JSB Exacts would be very good in your gun. Use the 8.4-grain pellets (JSBs).

    Do all of thaqt and get back to me.

    Also, tell me who mounted your scope because that is what we’re going to talk about next.

    B.B.


  10. I was shooting off a bench rest when i tried to sight in the scope.

    I did clean the bore before i shot the gun, and i just figured out my problem. I took my pellets and flared the skirt with a bic pen and went outside and shot some cans (it was too dark for targets).
    I didnt miss, so tomorrow ill put it on paper and see what happens.

    I mounted the scope myself, but all you had to do was slide the scope (already on the mounts) onto the 11 mm dovetail rail and tighten the screws.


  11. Peter,

    YES! Those Crosman pellets are too small and hard for that rifle. But what you did fixed the problem.

    You didn’t answer the artillery hold question. It makes the difference between a half-inch group and a three-inch group, so I hope you are learning it.

    Shooting off a sandbag is a real accuracy destroyer with most rifle unless your hand it there for the forarm to lay on.

    B.B.





  12. In your opinion. Is there a weight cap on airguns with a FPS of 495.

    Canada Law has non-Firearm grade Airguns (495 fps and below) so I was wondering at what point would heavy weight pellets become disadvantage.

    For this case, in both velocity and muzzle energy. (As there own separate category, not necessary both together. :)

    Also, the weight cap and difference when it comes to the weight between spring-(break barrel) and C02.

    To be a bit more specific.
    I shoot a Quest 500X, 177.
    And a Industry Brand QB78D .22. Canadian Spec'd at 495FPS (i'd assume so, I don't have a chronograph) Although it probably varies due to C02 and what not and weight.

    I've got a tin of RWS Hobby Wadcutters. 11g .22. Crosman Premier Ultra Mag .22.
    And Crosman Premier Pointed and HP for the .177.

    Probably will help me pick out pellets better in the future.
    As sometimes higher energy hits harder and well. @495 fps. Don't know how well that goes.
    Wanted to try out the JSB Monster. .22 25gram pellets.

    Thanks,
    Austin

    P.S. I plink and target shoot.


  13. Austin,

    Velocity and energy do not separate. One is a function of the other. It is very simple. The heavier the pellet at a given velocity, the greater the energy.

    Don't select pellets by velocity. Select them by accuracy. Canadian law requires that NO pellet exceed 500 f.p.s., so velocity doesn't matter. Heavy or light, none can exceed 500 f.p.s. So pick the most accurate pellet first, and if there are two, the heaviest pellet next.

    Powerplants are not an issue.

    B.B.



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