Crosman 2200 – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Before I start, since today is Thanksgiving Day in the U.S., I’d like to take this opportunity to thank the people who make this blog possible – our hosts at Pyramyd Air. They generously give us this wonderful place to explore airguns as much as we like, and for that they deserve our thanks.


Crosman’s 2200 Magnum was a great .22-caliber multi-pump of the 1980s.

Now for something old. Jim House wrote the book American Air Rifles, and he recently told me that the .22 caliber multi-pump pneumatic Crosman 2200 Magnum was one of the best-kept secrets of recent times.The first ones, made back in 1978-1980, were supposed to be extra powerful, capable of velocities over 700 f.p.s.! Then, Crosman throttled them back in 1981, so they were no longer more powerful than the Benjamin 392.

House buys them. Why shouldn’t I?
House told me that he buys every 2200 he sees unless it is outrageous or in sad shape, and he has them all put back into working condition. If you read about it in his book, he tells you that Crosman engineers now feel the stated maximum pump limit of 10 strokes was too much and that owners should stop at 8. House used a late 1980s gun for his velocity testing in the book, so his max velocity with RWS Meisterkugeln and 10 pumps was 590 f.p.s.

This is why I go to airgun shows!
Well, I stumbled on a real prize at the recent airgun show in Roanoke, Virginia. A first-variation 2200, it has the chromeplated receiver with a dark brown plastic stock and forearm. And, yes, this is one of those rare occasions where the gun really is plated with chrome – just like the metal on a motorcycle! Usually, the plating is nickel, which looks a little golden next to chrome. There were a few 2200s that were nickelplated, but apparently they’re quite scarce.


Chrome receiver looks sharp. You can see the scope rail at the top.

The gun is in like-new condition and the price was too good to pass up. Actually, the seller was a friend who cut me a real deal because he suspected what I wanted it for…this report.

This vintage air rifle is almost 39″ long, with an adult-sized 13.75″ pull. It weighs 4.5 lbs. I must admit that I don’t like the feel of a plastic stock, but the gun is quite attractive. If Crosman still sold it, I believe it would give the Daisy 22SG a run for its money.

The tests House published show the 2200 ahead of the 22SG for power, pump for pump. The 22SG has an all-wood stock and comes with its own scope, so there are some tradeoffs to be considered. The 2200 is grooved to accept a scope, and it comes with a nice set of adjustable open sights. While the adjustments are a bit fundamental, they do work, which is all that really matters.


Rear sight adjusts for both windage and elevation. Rear screw is loosened and sight pivots in the direction you want the pellet to go.

Fixing a gun the easy way
For all you readers who wonder whether I’m making all this up about how Crosman Pellgunoil saves old airguns, this gun was not accepting a charge until I oiled the pump head, as I have instructed so many of you to do. Of course, I used Pellgunoil for this. Of course, it worked. Even better, this is a “like new” airgun, it still has the sticker on it telling you to do just that! See! I wasn’t making it up! Crosman used to tell you to oil the pump head.


This is one of the places I get that advice I give.

We’ll check the speedometer tomorrow. Don’t eat too much turkey!

29 thoughts on “Crosman 2200 – Part 1




  1. BB,
    As of this November there were still a few Canadian 2200s for sale NEW online. I went and picked one up, marked 2004. I hope it can be hopped up to US specs with a valve from a 2100 but I would have to buy the whole tube because it seems to be crimped in place. There’s only TWO I think, so this isn’t really going to hurt pyramyd.

    I like it better than the 22SG by a wide margin because it simply doesn’t feel like you’ll bend it if you turn at the waist and bump the barrel into a tree.

    On the other hand the 22SG seems like a much more advanced design and you get more power for the effort. It also doesn’t leave you with the impression that they gave it an oversize receiver just for looks.

    The Crosman’s accuracy was good.


  2. Hey BB,

    Can you tell me where to drop PellGun oil into my Crosman SSP-250, to bring the seals back to life (it has a slow leak)? Also, where ARE the seals? I had always assumed they meant the plastic ring encircling the head of the Powerlet.

    Happy Thanksgiving, and thanks to you as well as to Pyramid Air.

    -Joe




  3. USA w/Canadian 2200 here.

    The valve pushes out forward. The crimp keeps it from sliding backward. I have a new U.S. valve and should be able to slide it right in. Canadians, dont do this until you check what the penalty is. I am in the US.

    There is a small hole drilled in the back of the canuck valve apparently to bleed off some PSI when the hammer hits the valve.

    BB, do you know WHAT they changed from the ’79-82′s? Do you know why they think 10 pumps is too much? Does the blast wobble the pellet or is there some kind of risk?


  4. B.B.

    I was just looking at the new baby desert eagle from magnum research that pyramyd air just got in. Could you do a review on this gun? I wanted to get the original desert eagle but it cost 150 bucks, and this new one is only 50 dollars. Also, in one of the pictures (on the black desert eagle) it doesn’t look like it has that screw thingy on the bottom of it, but on the other picture it does, any idea if it does or doesn’t?

    Happy thanksgiving to all.

    lama


  5. USA W/Canadian 2200 here.

    A word about why I already had the valve: I had to contact Crosman for a different problem and ordered a 2100 valve since I was already paying shipping.

    Why did I have to contact Crosman? The online seller who has these ain’t Pyramyd and ignored two emails in two weeks for service or a return.

    As for the valve the only hangup is that it may be tough to get the pump handle rollpin out without damage. It’s in really tight and hammering it out can flatten the pump tube or just expand the rollpin so you never get it out. After you get it out the pump and then the valve push right out.


  6. USA W/Canadian here.

    Well, I just put the gun back together with the US valve. I don’t have a chronograph but it sure is louder.



  7. Are the triggers of the CP88, 1911 and the Beretta FS92 equal or is one superior to another. It seems that if barrel length, power and double action mechanisms are the same then the main diffence in performance would be the trigger. I have a S&W 586-6 and like its trigger. I’m considering one of these other guns as well. How would these triggers compare?


  8. USA w/Canadian 2200,

    They changed the finish on the guns. The chrome plating changed to black.

    Crosman gave no reason for cutting back from 10 to 8 pumps, so I’ll assume it’s just moderation. An understressed mechanism always lasts longer.

    B.B.





  9. It depends on the gun. It’s safe to leave about 75 percent of the guns charged for years, but a few do need to CO2 removed.

    You have weeks of use, however.

    B.B.





  10. Well, they didn’t pan out. While they may look good, they failed to deliver in the power and accuracy departments.

    Mind you I’m getting all of this second hand, because I haven’t tested one yet. But dealer after dealer dropped them, and now RWS USA is no longer importing them.

    B.B.


  11. USA w/Canadian 2200 here again.

    I took the Canadian valve apart. The seals inside look like Teflon. One of them looked a bit charred and melted! I took the Canadian valve up to 20 pumps a few times.


  12. B.B. i’ve heard rumors that FP-10 dissolves the seals in airguns, i have been using for the last month now on my crossman premiers and haven’t noticed any damage to my 1250 but still…..
    would just like to know if this rumor is true or not, hoping you can shed some light on this
    thanks,
    scopestop



  13. Help, I Had a 2200 Mag. and it got stolen. I got a daisy but it just does not compair at all. I have looked at many sites on the web but can’t find one. Any thoughts?

    Chris





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