RWS 850 AirMagnum: Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier


The RWS 850 AirMagnum is a bolt-action repeater from Umarex.

We’ve really waited for this rifle! There’s too much to cover in one post, so I’ll have to break up the report.

Though the rifle is made by Umarex, both the packaging and the name on the rifle say RWS 850 AirMagnum. The rifle is a conventional bolt-action 8-shot CO2 repeater. It uses a removable 8-shot circular magazine to handle the pellets, and it’s a different kind of magazine than the standard Umarex 8-shot magazine we’ve used. This one is mostly synthetic with a metal ratchet gear attached in front.


The rifle has the traditional RWS logo. The automatic safety button extends from the back of the breech.

The rifle is powered by an 88-gram AirSource CO2 tank that resides inside the forearm. There is no provision for using 12-gram powerlets. The hollow stock is dark gray synthetic with pebble-pattern rough spots for both hands to grip, and the buttpad is a thick black rubber pad. The cheekpiece is on both sides of the stock, and the shape of the pistol grip is completely symmetrical – but the bolt-action cannot be switched to the left side of the receiver. So, the rifle is semi-ambidextrous.


The forearm slides off to insert the 88-gram AirSource tank.

The sights are post and notch with fiberoptic inserts. Both the post and notch are very square, so it’s easy to get a precision sight picture. The sights are adjustable for elevation only, but a long scope rail atop the receiver means this rifle is meant to be scoped.


The hooded front sight has a red fiberoptic insert.


The rear sight is a square notch with two green fiberoptic elements.

An adult air rifle
The 23.5″ solid steel barrel reminds us that Umarex is serious about this rifle. Though the power is limited to around 12 foot-pounds in .22 caliber, this gun is meant for adult use in every respect, so that’s how I’ll test it. The rifle I have is .177 caliber, and I’ll use serious pellets for long-range accuracy testing – JSB Exacts, Crosman Premiers (I’ll try both 7.9-grain and 10.5-grain) and maybe one or two other top performers.

What does the 850 compare to?
Being made of synthetic and powered by CO2, there might be a tendency to compare the 850 AirMagnum to Crosman’s 1077 repeater, but that would be wrong. This rifle weighs 6.75 lbs. with a fresh AirSource cartridge installed. The 6-18x Bushnell Trophy scope I chose for the test added another 1.25 lbs., bringing the total to 8 lbs. While a powerful scope might seem a little much for most CO2 rifles, I used it because this one is priced in the intermediate range – not the economy class. It costs a little more than a Gamo CF-X, so that’s what buyers will compare it to. We know before testing that the Gamo beats it in power, but perhaps the 850 AirMagnum exceeds the CF-X in accuracy.

Tomorrow, we’ll see it perform.

24 thoughts on “RWS 850 AirMagnum: Part 1

  1. B.B.
    Sorry for unrelated question.
    I do know that lower quality scopes not rated for high powered spring rifles can be damaged when used in spring rifles such as RWS dianas. But what about red dot sights? If a red dot sight made say, by BSA, or walther, around $30 to $50 price range were used on a RWS diana or a gamo CF-X for example, can those red dot sights potentially be damaged?


  2. I cant wait to see how this rifle performs. I’ve been thinking about the 2260 becuase its a co2 powered .22. Now, seeing a multishot co2 powered .22 is really exciting.

    Good luck with the testing BB.

    Cesar



  3. I was thinking buying or 1077, but this is much more qourity for only $100 more, so you think much better than 1077 for hunting ???
    if this is better than 1077, which caliber would you recomend for hunting, .177 or .22 ???
    I like .177 for cheap pellet from wal-mart but for hunting would be .22 ???? thanks for your inf. I really enjoying your blogs.


  4. I don’t know the answer to your question! I,ve never seen a damaged red dot and I do own several but I don’t use them that much. However, I did have one on a Beeman P1 pistol for over a year, and that’s a real kicker!

    Can a reader shed light on this?

    B.B.



  5. It would be good if you can latter write us about rifles to teach kids to shoot.
    I have been investigating from spring airsoft, to bbs, to pellets and have not been able to come with something satisfying. (Maybe a Red Ryder with lead round balls?)
    And thanks for all the help to the air shooting world!


  6. Would you please comment on how long an AirSource tank could be left in the rifle before leakage would render it unusable? With so many shots available, it seems likely that one may not exhaust the tank before some time had passed.



  7. I have an AirSoruce tank that’s been in a Benjamin AS392 for 18 months. I will go and take a shot with it now.

    I’m back. It shot with full power!

    I believe the time limit you see in the owner’s manual is keyed to liability issues, as well as operations.

    B.B.


  8. B.B.
    Since you say that the airsource left in an airgun is ok, does that apply to the CO2 powerlets also? Crosman manual says that removing CO2 powerlets in airpistols would prolong the life of the airpistol. But logically, I can’t see how the CO2 would damage the seals. I image it would just keep the seals from accumulating dirt and debris if you put the pellgun oil on the tip of the powerlet and store it in the gun. I imagine it’s more of a safety issue also. Is my logic correct or am I off?


  9. B.B.

    I have a Gamo Shadow 1000 and was wondering if you know about any other sight options other than the fiber optic sight that come with it, I’m disappointed with the accuracy i get at longer ranges. I read your other posts about peep sights and the advantages they have and thought if i could get them for my rifle i would have better sight pictures. ANY help from ANYONE would be GREATLY appreciated thank you for who can help me

    Ben



  10. Ben,

    The best thing would to be to buy a scope, but Mendoza selles peep sights that fit on the scope rails of rifles. give them a try.

    Jason


  11. WOULD IT BE O.K. TO BRAKE IN A NEW W.S. PATRIOT USING DAISY 14 GR. POINTED FIELD PELLETS? I HAVE A COUPLE THOUSAND OF THESE AND THEY ARE NOT VERY ACCURATE IN MY RWS 350.


  12. While flipping through my Gun Traders Guide I was surprised to see the Daisy company included, since the guide only deals with firearms. The entry said “Daisy V/L rifles carried the first and only commercial caseless cartridge system”, then went on to mention that the propellant in these cartridges was ignited by a jet of hot air. Perhaps this would be an interesting subject for a future blog, if it’s something you are familiar with.

    John


  13. B.B.
    Sorry for unrelated question.
    I do know that lower quality scopes not rated for high powered spring rifles can be damaged when used in spring rifles such as RWS dianas. But what about red dot sights? If a red dot sight made say, by BSA, or walther, around $30 to $50 price range were used on a RWS diana or a gamo CF-X for example, can those red dot sights potentially be damaged?

    I don’t know the answer to your question! I,ve never seen a damaged red dot and I do own several but I don’t use them that much. However, I did have one on a Beeman P1 pistol for over a year, and that’s a real kicker!

    Can a reader shed light on this?—-

    I installed a red dot on a quest 800 i had. It fell apart just as easy as the targetfinder 4×32 scope that came with the gun. I think the answer to your question could be found by calling the customer service people of the maker that developed the red dot sight you plan on buying.

    Sometimes the sights come with recommendations.

    I wish i could direct you to a good red dot sight, but I dont know much about…. Anything :)

    Another question you could probably ask is: Wich red dot sights has BB installed on TuFfFfF spring piston airguns.

    Cesar





  14. B.B.

    You probably remember me from the post about accuracy and i was confused about the different results i would get from my scope, i don’t know what it is, my gun, the scope or just me but i just cant get great results from my airgun and a scope. But right after i took the scope off i had a group that was 1/4 of an inch by 3 inches each pellet right above the other at 30 yards so it was MUCH better than anything i could do with a scope. I don’t know but I’m guessing the problem was me, i get better results just with regular sights. Thank you to everyone who helped though!

    -Ben


  15. B.B.

    About that drop of Pellgunoil. I looked closely where the AirSource cylinder screws in and it doesn’t look like there is a seal at the tip. There is an o-ring that fits around the top of an installed AirSource cylinder. Would you recommend a drop of Pellgunoil around the top of the cylinder (above the threads) as well as at the tip?

    Thanks,
    .22 multi-shot




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