Leapers 8-32x scope

by B.B. Pelletier

Today I’m looking at one of the best values in a powerful variable scope – Leapers 8-32×56 full-sized scope with mil-dot reticle and red/green illumination. This scope costs $230 for the model with the illuminated reticle and $196 without, which, to some, seems like a lot of money. To a serious shooter, it’s a pittance to pay for all the features this scope offers. Leupold scopes with less magnification, fewer features and less light transmission cost more than twice as much.

When I shot field target competitively (1998-2002), a scope like the Leapers 8-32x would have cost over $400. How much over is difficult to say. I paid about $450 for a Tasco Custom Shop 8-40x (on closeout sale) that doesn’t compare to the Leapers for brightness. I have to use it at 20-30x, because it becomes too dark at higher magnification. In contrast, the Leapers is bright all the way to 32x.

1/8-minute clicks
A target scope needs to have small adjustments, because target shooters want to make small corrections to get their pellets into the X ring. One-eighth minute clicks means that the strike of the pellet will move approximately 1/8″ per click at 100 yards. If you shoot closer than 100 yards, the amount of movement will be proportionately less. For example, 1/16″ at 50 yards and 1/80″ at 10 yards. Wow! That isn’t very much, is it? With some scopes, having adjustments this fine means the scope will have limited adjustability; but Leapers has built in more than 50 minutes of total adjustment. In a scope this powerful, that’s a lot!

Do you need illuminated reticles?
Illuminated reticles are good for those low-light hunting situations when you can see the game but not the reticle. They give you at least an extra 15 minutes of the most important hunting time, and more if there’s snow on the ground or a bright moon. If you aren’t a hunter, I can’t think of another good reason to have them. The Leapers scopes have multiple levels of illumination in either red or green, so you can use only what you need. I have used both the illuminated and non-illuminated model, and I find both to work well, though in truth I’ve never needed the illumination.

Mil-dot reticle
A mil-dot reticle is a fad for sportsmen, because not one hunter in a hundred knows how to apply the WORM formula to calculate range, nor are there common size cues like tanks and armored personnel carriers in the hunting grounds to apply it. But scope manufacturers have been touting range estimation for many years in one form or another, and this is the latest craze. Mil-dots do sell, so you’ll see more of them as time passes. One nice thing about the mil-dot reticle in this scope is that the reticle lines are thin enough for good long-range target work, and the dots do help you find the lines when the background tries to obscure them.

What is this scope good for?
This is a great scope for field target shooters on a budget. It’s also wonderful for long-range and benchrest shooters of both air rifles and firearms. At nearly two full pounds (29 oz.), it’s not the scope for a casual .22 rimfire, a 30/30 lever-action brush gun or a plinking rifle. It’s really too much scope for almost all spring rifles, though a TX200 or BAM B40 could use it. Remember, too, you don’t have to leave it cranked up to 32x all the time. It’s also an 8x scope that’s more user-friendly when the target is hard to locate in the eyepiece.

On 32x, this is one of the least fussy scopes on the market. Some, like the Burris 8-32x, go black if your eye strays a fraction of an inch from where it’s supposed to be. The Leapers behaves more like a 12x scope when it is turned up all the way. Also, the parallax adjustment goes all the way down to 10 yards, even on the highest power. You’ll be watching ants walk on grass blades at that range and magnification!

Is this a good scope? Yes! It’s a great scope, as long as you realize how large and heavy it is. This scope will save you hundreds of dollars without giving up any quality.

53 thoughts on “Leapers 8-32x scope

  1. Hey BB my B3 came yesterday! It is a nice rifle, but the bluing in some spots is poor, the stock is ok. I did not get to the spring (or piston) yet but I did redo the trigger with the parts in the cleaning kit and its much smoother now, lubed it up (everything) and tested it with gamo magnum. (first thing on hand)

    Also the “Industry Brand” pellets where not so bad either. (had to throw away about 3 in a round of 50)

    But the manual was hilarious the poor transaltion made really funny sentences! (i.e. Now ready to trigger shooting, nor hurt the people, It is easy in use, also there are tons of typos.)

    What I plan to do:
    Redo Stock
    Redo Bluing
    Replace Mainspring
    Possiably add muzzle brake (build one)
    Add scope (already on the way!)


  2. Happy New Year, BB!
    I have a Sumatra 2500 Carbine and my ammo of choice is the 28 grain Eun Jins.
    My questions are is their a heavier pellet available?
    What about casting my own pellets(and what weight)? If practacal where would I purchase the casts?

    thanks,

    Jay



  3. Jay,

    There used to be some solid bullets weighing as much as 37 grains, but I don’t think they are available anymore.

    If you cast your own bullets, they need to drop from the mold at 0.216″

    No bullet mold made is that size, so you will have to get a custom one. They run about $100 and up for the blocks.

    B.B.


  4. BB
    I had a 4x Bug Buster with illuminated reticles. They were very useful for pigeons up in the rafters, but the reticles were so thick that they covered up the bullseye on targets. Are you saying they are acceptably thin on the 8-32?
    Thanks, and Happy New YEar
    MCA


  5. MCA,

    Yes, compared to the Bug Buster reticle, the 8-32 reticle is much thinner. They are not as thin as some Leupold reticles that are suited for target use only. I had one of those and had a heck of a time keeping traqck of the reticle on all but sunny days on a clean rifle range.

    The 8-32 reticle is the perfect size for both target use and hunting, plus those dots make it easy to locate.

    B.B.


  6. Hi B.B.,

    Can the Leapers 8-32×56 scope with stand the recoils of RWS 48/52/54 Airgun.?
    What kind of warranty does the Leapers 8-32×56 have in case the RWS 48/52/54 break the scope?

    Thanks for the info!

    Pelking.

    Thanks!


  7. Hi BB,

    For the Leapers 8-32×56 scope, what kind of scope ring and mount that will mount on a CFX as well as the RWS 48?

    Thanks!

    Pelking.




  8. quick question. for a 392 would you get a peep sight or a b square mount and leapers red dot sight? im leaning toward the red dot but its more than twice thee price.also i think the peep sight is nore for target shooting and in going to be plinking and hunting



  9. golgo

    hey! BB, i have a 6-24×50 AO leapers scope and i always loose my illuminated recticles in the fist few days.the the green is usually the first to go then the red follows soon after.this is my third exchange of the scope,the new one should have been here already.And my first one i got it would not even zero in and i still lost illumination in ther first 2 houres of getting it and my last scoped worked great till the second week the i lost illumnation went and i lost zero and could not get it back.i figured out why i lost my zero because i was making very larg windage and alevation adjustments(too bad i didnt figure that out till it was too late).so hopefully the 3rd one’s the charm.do you have any clue why im loosing my illumation so soon only after a few days or houre’s of owning the scope????or am i just the unlucky getting the one’s with the defects in them? oh! im using it or was using it on a gamo shadow 1000 air rifle.thanxs any insight will be very nice if there is any,i just might have bad carma or sumthing


  10. golgo

    This is off subject but the gamo shadow 1000 shoots very accurately using a bipod.Im using a leapers uneversal clamp on bipod.most springers dont shoot very accurately on a bipod but this on does with no prob.And by the way when you buy a leapers product it comes under the name UTG not leapers,i wounder why that is.Do you why BB?


  11. golgo

    BB,do you know what is the best weight pellet for 1000 fps gun that delivers the best speed,distance and impact?I know that a light pellet travels faster but lacks enertia to travel longe distance and impact.And a heavy pellet gives great impact but cant travel very far and it has a sharper ballestic curve if it does not have the right amout of power/speed behind it and it also fairs better in the wind then a lighter pellet


  12. B.B.

    What would be the best .22 cal air rifle for under $200 dollars for hunting? also, would the benji 392 work for hunting game to the size of squirrels?


  13. B.B.

    ignore my last comment… sorry lol… OUT OF THESE 4 air rifles for hunting/reliability/accuracy, what would you choose…
    -Beeman ss 1000 (like the scope combo)
    -Baikal MP 513M
    -Mendoza RM600
    -Benjamin Sheridan 392




  14. Hi BB,

    I find mildots are good for use as aim points, both for windage and elevation, once you get good at estimating the range. I leave my scope on 8X mag for HFT shooting.

    ATVB,

    Tenuc


  15. Pelking,

    The Leapers 8-32 is a TS platform scope. Read Tom Gaylord’s article “The asked for it” on this site to learn how tough they are.

    As for mounts, one gun at a time please. For the RWS Dianas, you need to hang a stop pin in front of the gun’s mount base, because Diana makes no provision for a scope stop.

    The CF-X has a scope stop hole for the vertical pin, so the stop is placed behind the rings.

    B.B.


  16. hb,

    Any Leapers scope can be used on a centerfire rifle. The TS scopes can withstand elephant rifle recoil. Read Tom Gaylord’s article, “They asked for it” on this web site to learn how tough they are.

    B.B.




  17. Golgo,

    Your situation does sound strange. I have never had a Leapers illuminated scope go bad ever, and I have 10 of them. This is not a known problem.

    However, the zero problem is attributable to the “large” adjustments. I think you need an adjustable scope mount, so you can keep the scope more centered in its adjustment range.

    Your rifle is not too hard on a scope.

    B.B.



  18. golgo,

    We can discuss pellet shapes and weights all day long, but in the end only one thing matters – accuracy. Use the most accurate pellet you can find, then learn where it will be at all ranges.

    I have found that spring guns most often prefer lighter pellets. That’s not a law, just a generalization.

    B.B.






  19. B.B.

    I’m sort of confused by your answer. You said that i answered my own question, does that mean you would choose the Benjamin 392? or would you pick the MP 513M over the benji? I own a 397 for plinking, and i love it, but does the 392 really have enough power for hunting? also what weight JSB exact domes would work best for the 392, and would the Kodiaks/crow magnums be too heavy for use in the 392… Thanks so much for your help by the way!


  20. B.B.

    The 3 main guns im looking at are the Baikal MP 513M, Beeman SS1000, and the Benji 392, all which are under $200 … im really having trouble deciding on which one to get, i want a reliable/powerful/accurate .22 cal hunting rifle, but dont want to spend over $200…. Dont like the looks of the 513m, but hear good things about it. Like the looks of the SS1000 but dont know much about it and dont like how it doesnt have open sights, and everyone seems to love the good ole 392… so each one has something i like so its hard for me to choose. Oh and i took your advise on the BAM B40/Leapers 3-9×40 and placed an order for it, cant wait to get it, ill wright a short feedback to you and tell you what i think.


  21. StiCkY,

    Yes, I meant the 392. The MP 513M is a spring rifle, so it’s harder to shoot accurately, but more powerful and far better suited to a scope.

    I use 15.9-grain JSB domes, so they are my recommendation. I have killed small game with the Blue Streak, which is almost exactly the same as a 392.

    As long as you are also getting the BAM B40, why not also get a pneumatic?

    B.B.


  22. Bryan with the chinese guns: Be careful with the bluing. Most cold bluing compounds just aren’t worth it. If you scrupulously degrease they look OK, but then the corners rub off to bare steel. Trust me, dude. Cold blues just don’t work so good.

    Plus, I hope you use a stripper on the stock instead of going in with sandpaper like a barbarian.


  23. B.B.

    So the 392 would be the ideal rifle for under $200? I hate pumping so many times, but the 397 shoots fairly nice and is worth the pumping, but gets tiring when shooting target practice for a distance of time… What kind of pneumatic are you talking about? Single stroke, or pre-charged? I want a Talon REALLY REALLY bad, but i really dont have that money to spend, plus you have to buy a scuba fill or a pump, thats another 2-300 dollars… i would love to have one though :)
    Well, i guess ill be ordering my 392 today! Is there a certain oil i should use for standard maintenance? I always read you recommending Pellgun oil to people, is that suitable for the 392? One thing ive always wondered, what exactly is the pumping effort per pump on the 392/392, because my 397 seems a lil bit harder to pump the more you do.


  24. StiCkY,

    The pump effort increases as the pressure in the gun rises. You have to overcome that pressure to force more air in.

    Pellgunoil is what you want. It goes on the pump head, which is just visible in the pump slot when the handle is all the way forward.

    B.B.



  25. B.B.

    Well…just got done ordering my Benji 392-crosman 64 peepsight-and 2 tins of JSB exacts…. cant wait to tell you what i think, i hope the peepsight is worth the $20 … i really never have liked the benji’s stock sights. Would the peepsight help for hunting?


  26. StiCkY,

    I would use a chamber oil for springers. One drop a year or every 3,000 pellets.

    Concerning peep sights – just look at most of the world’s top military rifles. They have peep sights. That goes back to 1884, when the Buffington sight was put on the .45 caliber Trapdoor Springfield rifle.

    Peep sights rule the world of non-optical sights.

    If they can be used in battel they certainly can be used for hunting.

    B.N.


  27. B.B., will you be able to do a field test for us of the Leapers scope of the sort you recently described? Checking repeatability, etc.? If it holds up well to those criteria then it’s an outstanding value! Thanks.


  28. Hi B.B.

    I assume you know how to contact Tom Gaylord. In his article: “All about scopes. Part 2.” he mentions: “We may do a special article on B-Square AA adjustable rings in the future…” I just purchased a Leapers scope with B-Square adjustable rings from Pryamydair, and the mounting instructions are in French. Well not really but they might as well be for a novice. It appears you adjust the elevation/windage with the ring caps off. Anyway that article sure would be timely for me and I’m guessing more and more folks are going with the adjustables, which I see you pushing all the time.

    I also purchased a Crosman peep for my Ben 392 and it appears I might have to remove the factory rear sight to get it sighted. Does this sound right?

    Also… I was wondering if you knew how much recoil force the spring pistons generate.

    Thanks as always.

    jw



  29. JW,

    I’ll ask Tom about the adjustment article. Yes, the scope caps must be free to turn to adjust elevation – not windage.

    No idea of the recoil force of a springer.

    B.B.



  30. hey b.b.
    i have a question about the leapers scope you used on your cfx review. well i just bought mine and every thing is very tight i loosened the set-screws for the elevation and wind and that of course worked but its the adjustable objective dial that has me worried. theres an odd noise coming form it when turned(sounds like “plinking/tink” noise) and it is extreamly tight. can i loosen this some how, so it will become more smooth or will it just work it self in? and is that wheel they sell a good idea? it will turn easier but i shouldn’t force should i ?

    thanks rig.


  31. Rig,

    The best thing to do is return your scope for a replacement. There should be no noise from the AO.

    These scopes are tight when new and do work in. That is caused by a viscous grease on the threads. All scope makers use this grease, but sometimes they use too much.

    Tight is better than loose. Loose knobs can turn when you don’t want them to.

    But the noise is not right. Return that scope.

    B.B.


  32. thanks b.b.
    i worked the a.o. back and forth about ten times to see if the grease would warm up a bit and smoothe things and it did, a little bit. but still tight between 15 and 10 yards and the noise is sounding less. now more like a spring riding over a rod with a little burr on it, just catching a bit, but still plinking along
    i got that scope mail-order so i hoping that noise will get slighter yet. i’ll work it a little more tonight and see if it does.
    thanks for getting back to me on this.
    rig.


  33. Greeting from Indonesia,

    I’m just received two units of Leapers 3-9×50 scope (SCP-395AOMDLTS)that was purchased through a website in US. The scope was mounted with “Full Length Integral High Profile Mount (RGPM2PA-25H4)” on Diana 350 Magnum air rifle.

    The first scope was zeroed only 2 minute by using Laserlyte bore sighter at 35 yards then the zero was locked. After shooting almost an hour, I lose the zero and never succeed on zeroing this scope again. The problem is with elevation adjustment that unable to move up the pellet in the center of target even the elevation adjustment knobs has been turn to maximum. The green illuminated reticle on this scope also work for 10 minute before totally down even the battery has been replace with the fresh one.

    The second scope even more weird. It couldn’t ever get zeroed at all. The problem also with elevation adjustment but Red/Green illuminated reticle work well on this scope.

    I need some information concerning this matter as follow;

    1. I’m not realy sure if this is an genuine product of leapers since I saw it was wrote “Made in China” on the scope. Would you please let me know how to identify this product is genuine or not?

    2. Since I’m not able to zeroing this scope, is there a way to reset all setting to factory default? And how to fix this problem if resetting to factory default did not solve this issue?

    Any help would be great. Thanks.

    Regards,
    sizulku


  34. sizulku,

    What you are describing sounds like a scope mount problem, not a scope problem. I cannot tell from your terminology what scope mount you are using.

    What method are you using to stop the scope mount from moving?

    I doubt you have a counterfeit Leapers scope, since Leapers scopes are already quite inexpensive.

    regarding the reticle light. Rotated the dial several times to clean the contacts, and install the spare battery that Leapers puts in every scope box.

    B.B.


  35. Hi B.B.

    Thanks for your reply, I greatly appreciate it.

    I’m not sure if the problem is with the sope mount since I’m using their Accushot High Profile Full Length Integral Mount [http://www.pyramydair.com/cgi-bin/accessory.pl?accessory_id=636] to mount this scope. This scope mount also tested to mount Tasco 6-24X50 scope and it takes 5 minutes to be zeroed.

    Rotated the dial knobs and installing new batteries won’t solve my green light issue. I’ve contacted leapers concerning this scope problem and still waiting they way to resolve this. But the good news is, the scope that I’ve purchased are from leapers, made in china is genuine.

    regards,
    sizulku


  36. BB,
    Hi, I bought a benji 392 from Pyramid back in 2006. I have always stored it with 2 pumps in the chamber and oiled it carefully per the manual supplied with the gun. Recently i found i could not pump it up. By that i mean it would not hold any air – there was virtually no resistance when pumping. My manual says use Pellgunoil only on the pump lever pivots and rivets. It says nothing at all about oiling the pump head/rubber cup. I see in some of the posts here that you recommend doing this. Is the lack of oil on this part what has caused my rifle to not hold air? I'm confused! Pleas advise.
    mikey


  37. Mikey,

    by all means put some oil on the pump seal head of your rifle. Extend the lever and before you push it back into place to pump, you should see the pump head at the beginning of the compression chamber. Put a couple of drops of oil on it and let it sit for a while. Let us know if this solves your problem.

    By the way, you realize you've posted your problem on a 3 year old blog? Very few of us look at the older blogs, other than a core of a few volunteers, of which I am one. You will get much more exposure and suggestions by posting on the current blog. It can be found at:

    http://www.pyramydair.com/blog

    It's published Monday through Friday. Off-topic posts are always welcomed.

    Fred PRoNJ


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