Webley Raider 10 – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Before we begin, an announcement about an airgun show coming up. The Potomac Arms and Collectors gun show will be held in Frederick, Maryland, on September 13 & 14 at Elks Lodge #684. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. Entrance fee is $6, 6″ sales tables are $50 and 8′ tables are $60. Call 301-424-7988 and speak to Marv Freund to register. This is a combined gun and airgun show that draws a lot of Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Washington DC collectors. I’ve done well there with sales tables in the past. You’ll see some very nice collectible airguns at this show.

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Straightening barrels

Guest blogger
Rick Klages had an unfortunate accident that bent the barrel of his R9 Goldfinger air rifle. He asked me for advice and was surprised when I told him to just bend it back. This is his story.

If you’d like to write a post for this blog, please email me at blogger@pyramydair.com.

Bloggers must be proficient in the simple html that Blogger software uses, know how to take clear photos and size them for the internet (if their post requires them), and they must use proper English. We will edit each submission, but we won’t work on any submission that contains gross misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

Straightening barrels
by Rick Klages

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How does a pneumatic airgun work?

by B.B. Pelletier

I got a request for this article last week from Manish in India and then another request to explain what is meant by the term valve lock, so I’ll deal with both subjects today.

There’s very little difference between the valve in a multi-pump pneumatic and a precharged pneumatic. Add air volume to a multi-pump reservoir and you can make the gun capable of multiple shots on a single fill of air. Then the only difference between that and a precharged gun would be the presence of the onboard pump. Therefore, the valve I will discuss applies equally to both types of pneumatics.

First, let’s look at a closed valve (graphic below). The reservoir is filled with compressed air that wants to get out, but the valve is blocking its way. Air pressure on the valve (red) presses it against the valve seat, which is a part of the valve body (black). The walls of the reservoir tube are also shown in black. A valve return spring inside the valve body also holds the valve shut, but with far less pressure than the air itself. The purpose of the return spring will be obvious in a moment.

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Leapers base for RWS Diana rifles – Part 3 More testing

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Today, I’ll tell you how the new Leapers scope base for RWS Diana rifles installs, and give you some insight into what it was like to test this thing. The first thing you need to remember is that every RWS Diana air rifle has a different amount of droop. In general, the breakbarrels have more than the fixed barrels. I was fortunate to have on loan from Pyramyd Air an RWS Diana 34 Panther with a huge amount of droop. So much, in fact, that it was impossible to get on target at 20 yards by using just the scope’s internal adjustments. That was exactly the kind of rifle I needed to test this new base, because that was the worst problem of all…not a gun with a few inches of droop, but one with almost 21 inches at the most useful airgun range of 20 yards. If a base could compensate for a rifle like this one, it would work for most of the others that have less droop!

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Webley Raider 10 – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

This test is for DH and for all of you who like to hear about fine PCPs. Pyramyd Air sent me a .22-caliber Webley Raider 10 some time back and it was working its way to the front of the queue when DH asked about it. This is the 10-shot model, not the 2-shot rifle.

Like a carbine
The Raider 10 is light weight at 6.6 lbs. and short, at just 38 inches. It’s really more of a carbine than a full-sized rifle, but that should make the hunters happy. The metal is evenly finished in most places, with a few tool marks showing through on the receiver and some dull patches on the reservoir. The finish is a medium shine that’s brighter than matte, but not the deep black of some other airguns.

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HW 55SF – Part 3 Shooting behavior and velocity

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Let’s look at how the HW 55 SF performs, in terms of firing behavior and power. I told you about the rifle in the first two reports, but I didn’t dwell on how it shoots. First, the 55 is delightfully easy to cock. An effort of only 20 lbs. cocks the gun, due in great part to the length of the 18.5″ barrel. Because this is the rare SF model, there’s no barrel latch to contend with, but the flip side of that is, of course, a stronger breech detent holding the barrel shut. Years of fooling with Beeman Crow Magnums and Webley Patriots makes me slap the muzzle of every breakbarrel now to open it, so this is not a problem.

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Discovery barrel – to glue or not to glue

Introduction by B.B. Pelletier

Guest blogger
Wayne Burns is a new reader of this blog, though he’s been an airgunner most of his life. But he’s learning about new kinds of airguns here, and sharing those experiences with us. Today, he tells us about a modification he made to his Benjamin Discovery rifle.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me at blogger@pyramydair.com.

Bloggers must be proficient in the simple html that Blogger software uses, know how to take clear photos and size them for the internet (if their post requires them) and they must use proper English. We will edit each submission, but we won’t work on any submission that contains gross misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

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