Crosman 1377 – Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

I’ll test accuracy today. I want you to remember the price of this pistol – that it is less than half the cost of a Benjamin HB17. I’ve heard from shooters who love their 1377s and from a few who think the HB17 is far superior. In fairness, the 1377 lovers outnumber the Benjamin fans several times, as the price would seem to dictate. So one of my big questions was, “Is the 1377 a credible air pistol, all things considered?”

Sight adjustments
The pistol shot high at 21 yards, as several readers said it would. When I adjusted it as low as it would go, it shot below the point of aim, which is also good. I fiddled with the sights for a while until I got them where they needed to be, which turned out to be where I started! You see, I had started shooting with my glasses on, but when I tool them off, the front sight became sharp and in-focus, and it was easy to align with the rear. Until I did that, I got lots of vertical stringing.


Initial groups were high, but not due to the sights. I was unable to see the sights clearly through my glasses. Once I took them off, the problem went away.


Many of my early groups were strung out vertically, like this group of 5 RWS Superdomes.

I started shooting RWS Superdomes, then switched to Beeman Kodiaks and finally tried Crosman Premier 7.9-grain pellets. After I switched to Premiers, I started settling down. After discarding my glasses, I adjusted the sights a bit and got them pretty well centered for 21 yards on 6 pumps. Then, the groups tightened up!

The average group of Premiers was just larger than six tenths of an inch and there really was no “best group. They seemed to shoot where expected once the sights were fully seen and understood.


An average group of five Premiers at 21 yards is 0.622″ center-to-center. That’s not bad for open sights on a $55 air pistol!


The best group of five Premiers measures 0.591″. Not much different than the average.

After trying a great many groups of Premiers, I shot a single group of Superdomes, and bested the best of the Premiers by a couple of thousandths. Too close to call, really.


The best group of 5 RWS Superdomes measures 0.584″. They beat the Premiers by a thin margin, though it’s really too close to call.

At the end of testing, I shot a final group of RWS Superdomes, and darned if I didn’t beat the best group of Premiers! This is one of those airguns that simply shoots a wide selection of pellets, so leave nothing untried.

The 1377 shoots!
The point is that the Crosman 1377 really shoots! For not much money, you get both power and accuracy in a simple package. People are always asking about guns like that, so I have to tell them this is a world-beater. I don’t know where you can find this kind of value in an air pistol anymore.

The downside
The 1377 isn’t perfect. It has two obvious flaws that most people will notice – the trigger and the grips. The single-stage trigger is stiff and slightly creepy – breaking fairly consistently at 5 lbs. 2 oz. The grips are loose on the gun and no amount of screw-tightening can help them. One reader told us he installed shims under the plastic panels, but many simply swap them for a custom pair of wood panels from Ralph Brown. Either way will fix the problem, which is more annoying than functional.

With both of those problems I still managed to shoot some nice groups, so the problems aren’t insurmountable. And, given the strength of the aftermarket for this pistol, they can be resolved in a number of different ways.

I’m very pleased with the performance of the 1377. It makes me wish Crosman would bring back the 1322, because it upholds more than a half-century of air pistol-making.

56 thoughts on “Crosman 1377 – Part 3

  1. Morning B.B. Yes I dearly love my old 1377 and would buy a new 1372 if only one was made. Talked with the folks at Airhog about the bloop tube for the TalonSS and a 24″ barrel, but they recommended the standard SS with their bloop tube something to do with having to maybe change the valving because of the longer barrel. Good idea/bad idea?? help please and thanks Mr B


  2. Bring back the 1322!

    You are correct. Crosman is missing the boat by not producing a 1322. Instead of featuring both a CO2 pistol and a COs carbine in the "Build Your Own Airguns" in the Custom Shop,

    http://www.crosman.com/site/custom_store

    it should offer a 1377 as the base model for customization. After all, the CO2 pistol is essentially the same as the carbine – so I never really understood the point of the two offerings. Both of these can be customized with a .22 barrel. How difficult would it be to offer a 1377 with a .22 barrel?

    I have written Crosman with this request too many times. Maybe Crosman will listen to you?

    Thanks for a great article BB>


  3. Mr. B.,

    I have no idea what Airhog told you. The Talon SS with a 24-inch barrel is a wonderful rifle and nothing but the barrel has to be changed.

    The Condor bloop tube will work perfectly.

    Now a Standard 12-inch SS will be quieter, and also half as powerful.

    B.B.



  4. Thanks for trying BB. Maybe if we all join in, Crosman will get the idea.

    Here is the link for the on-line contact form:

    http://www.airguns.com/contact

    Tell Crosman to list the 1377 on the Custom Shop. That way, we can order it in various configurations right from the factory. 1322, carbine, steel breach, upgraded sights, scope, etc.


  5. I also love my 1377. It is at the perfect power point for me: at 10 pumps, it’s enough to cleanly kill a mouse or rat, but also weak enough that misses bounce off the baseboards instead of destroying them.

    Mine shoots best with RWS Hobbys, but the Premiers are a very close second.

    Like the reviewed airgun, mine came from the factory bone-dry (Both of them, actually: my first one shot too far left to correct, but Pyramyd Air replaced it with no hassle). And the trigger pull was atrocious, bruising my index finger. After oiling and about 200 rounds, the trigger settled down to about 8 pounds.

    The front sight was hard to locate when shooting at any dark-colored target, so I added a “JohnO DIY High Visibility Front Sight” with red tape, and that made it a breeze to shoot, as numerous small rodents can attest.

    I also found that used earplugs can make great reactive targets, as long as you don’t mind missing a lot. At least they help reinforce “aim small”.


  6. I would rather they invest the time and energy in a multi-shot steel breech, that would fit recent model 22xx/13xx guns,…but thats just my humble opinion…


  7. All,
    BB’s test result track perfectly with miine. It was like he was shooting my 1377.

    About the only difference is mine is now scoped and at 21-yards the group shrinks to 1/2″ or better. Better when my son shoots it.

    The trigger is so easy to fix with just a little research.

    I wish BB had touched on and photographed the little screw in the breech that must be tighted on just about every new 1377.

    DB



  8. BB, I’m guessing the 1377 is rifled… but was that always the case? I had one from my Dad that was also supposed to be god for BB’s, and I’m virtually certain that this one was a smoothbore.


  9. B.B.

    Sounds like one on the low cusp of the legitimate….

    Thanks for the answer about the Winchesters yesterday (you too, Sam). So the blackpowder/airgun analogy appears again. The increased power of the rifles sort of restores my faith in the Old West. Speaking of which, I’ve finished up the Elmer Keith book. Quite a read. I believe that he lived out most of his life in the 20th century, but his descriptions of gunfighting sound like the Wild West was going strong up to WWII. As surprising as anything was the habit for people to shoot each other for trivial reasons or no reason at all. Then at the end of the book, he talked about the rising crime rates of the modern era????

    I also see that he was an airgun enthusiast in spirit. He keeps admonishing readers to use cheap .22 ammo to practice for the heavy calibers (buying in lots of 10,000). I’ll go him one better with .177 pellets. On to the crossbow book.

    Wayne, how’s it going with the IZH 61? I hope to hear your opinion after trying such a huge range of airguns.

    Matt61

    Matt61




  10. BB,
    Yes the very small screw in the breech. I purchase two last fall and both were loose. That plus all the questions about it on the prior 1377 blog add up to make one believe this is a common problem.

    Anyway the fix is so easy to perform yet so difficult to describe without a photo. Maybe I’m just slow but I didn’t even think the screw was a screw because it was so small.

    BTW… if you pop a scope on the barrel the lack of tightness is amplified.

    DB



  11. BB,

    It looks like a great pistol for small change. Looking at the groups, I can’t help but think that a minor lap of the crown could put it over the top. I’m going by the fact that velocity was pretty consistent, so the fact that you get what looks like two very nice groups with some separation might be a bit of roughness in the crown.



  12. Afternoon B.B. thanks again for your advice concerning the TalonSS. I’m going to order the SS, 24″ barrel, and Condor bloop tube today. I’ll run the chronny numbers and let you know how the 2 configurations compair. Folks, the 1377 is less than a tank of gas–a real deal for a good shooter. If you don’t have one why not? Mr B



  13. Good evening B.B. I think the figures you quoted are for .177, I was thinking of getting it in .22 for the small game hunting capabilities. Your thoughts please Mr B


  14. Matt61,

    I gave the IZH 61 to Josh, one of our members in both LLCs.. He, Nate and Lowell are testing the smaller, low noise ones. They all have kids… He reports that the magazine transfer issue I was having got worked out with about another 100 shots of having to help it feed.. But now it's fine and lot's of fun in his trailer park backyard shooting range.. He said the accuracy compares to the Dasisy Avanti Champion 499, both very good..

    Kevin,

    Thank you, I am going to keep it to a well thought out minimum…

    Thanks also for the S410 stock link very cool, but I'm duly impressed with the walnut one it came with, at least enough to not spend for an upgrade… but, thanks for the thought..

    B.B.

    I just ordered the Talon SS also.
    Are saying that by just adding a longer 24" barrel it gets twice as powerful?
    How much louder over the standard SS, without adding the bloop tube?

    Wayne
    AARR&R


  15. Wayne,

    Thanks for letting me know. Try it yourself when you have a chance. I noticed just last night that this gun will tell you when you’re not following through. I was getting large, messy holes. Then, when I remembered to look through the shot and stay on target, the hole shrank dramatically. Not ideal for a competition gun but great for a trainer.

    Matt61


  16. Matt61,

    If I can get it back from him and the kids, they’re having too much fun with it.. I may have to wait until we get the “fun range” part set up here to get that part of the inventory back again…if ever.. I may have to write it up as a draw for them…

    Josh would agree with you, it is a great trainer, like the dasiy 499

    Wayne


  17. BB,
    Yes tightening that little screw makes a world of difference. The barrel still floats a small amount but not enough for concern.

    On mine I also shimmed the barrel in the breech to further tighten it. It is very solid now… even with a scope on it.

    BG_Farmer,
    Yes a recrown does improve accuracy. Found it did more than smoothing out the trigger. Though that helps too. Mine shoots like a $150 gun and all I’ve done is clean, polish, and oil parts.

    I’d really like a barrel that is a bit longer. Maybe I’ll upgrade it some day.

    DB




  18. Wayne,

    A standard Talon SS produces a max energy of about 25 foot-pounds. Put a 24-inch barrel on the same gun and the max energy climbs to about 45 foot-pounds. So the answer is yes – that is all it takes to almost double the energy.

    The rifle becomes noisier with the muzzle out in the open, but a bloop tube from Airhog takes it back down to SS levels.

    B.B.






  19. B.B.,
    I’m sure a steel breech would be a very effective at creating a solid barrel. However it would still rely on that same small screw. The screw actually holds the breech solid and in turn the breech holds the barrel solid.

    In fact is was my plan to make that upgrade until I finally figured out what people were attempting to tell us new owners. Like I said the screw is so small some, like me, find it difficult to believe it is even a screw. That and it takes a really small allen head wrench. I had to go out and buy one.

    DB


  20. 1377c:

    BREECH: I have a crosman long steel breech. I like it for mounting scopes. If I didn't mount a scope, I would just leave the original sights on that I painted the tips with bright yellow paint. I think crooked barn has a super breach that allows you to float the barrel.

    TRIGGER: I had no luck in finding an adjustable two stage seers so I used a lighter shorter trigger spring and sanded a faucet washer down to fine tune the trigger pull to 3 LBS. Light, but still safe.

    Witt posted that with the following crosman parts you can make your own adjustable trigger spring.

    NS1200-016 Spring
    2300-038 Spring spacer
    2300-039 Spring spacer nut

    GRIPS: You can find a lot of grip for them online. I shimmed my original left synthetic grip by wedging part of a toockpick up from the bottom and painting it black. The original one was a little loose. I do have some RB SuperPump Grips on order now.

    PELLETS (My Favorites):

    Flatheads – Gamo Super Match

    Points – RWS Super Points

    Domed – H&N Field Target Trophy

    Hollow Points – Beeman Coated Hollow Points

    CUSTOMIZE: There are many forums and sights on how to customize the 1377. For power I think the 2250 (14.6" .22 barrel) with a pistol grip or a 2300 with a Lothar Walther match 10.1" .177 barrel would be fun to customize.


  21. i love my 1377. i shoot it more than any other pistol. I sell ultra light trigger sprinds for them and the 2240. Use gamo match pellets for incredible groups! gamo match diablo pellets are very inexpensive and shoot like a high end match pellet. lotusofasia@hotmail.com



  22. The 1377 is fun little airgun. I forgot to order the trigger shoe, but next time I place an order at crosman I will.

    The Ralph Brown Super-Pumper is great. Really helps you from pinching your hands or fingers. The Target Grip is comfortable.

    I tried a pellet today which really worked out well for me, the Air Arms Diabolo Field 4.52 cal. 8.44 gr (.547 grams). Probably the best pellet I’ve used so far.


  23. Part 3 link is not on part 1 or 2 except when noted by BB in a comment. Also, part 3 doesn’t seem to show up when you do a search anymore.

    Big Ed’s Making adjustable two stage seers again. He was gone for a few weeks for medical reasons. I ordered one and kept my original spring to compare to my single stage set-up I have now.

    I did have to shim my wooden grips. I used a piece of a cotton swab shaft and permanant black marker. If you look on the bottom of your pistol frame it makes a T shape. The upper right corner of the T is where I added the shim(same place as the original shim I used).

    _____
    ..|s
    ..|
    ..|

    There may be a better way of dealing with this. This one was quick and easy so I quit there. It held for two years until I change grips.


  24. I have had my model 1377 since 1992 and recently it has quit holding air. When I try to pump it there is no longer any resistance against the pump handle. I received a parts list from Crossman so I could try to repair it, but they refuse to give me instructions on how to break down the gun. Does anyone have any instructions on how to repair this problem or break the gun down? Any help would be much appreciated.



  25. Adding a pellet holder to your 1377 is easy! Check this out. I bought STATICO Black Conductive High Density PU Foam, its used for hold Integrated Circuits in storage. You can buy it at Fry’s Electronics and similar.

    Cut out a small strip to fit on the breech block, on the left hand side. Next, use a 1/8 or slightly smaller drill bit and hand drill four holes.

    Finally, grab some 3M double sided sticky squares, the foam type with some depth to them. Cut a couple of strips to the size of the PU Foam and then setup the entire rig on the breech block.

    And you’re done. Cheap and simple. You can carry 4 + 1 rounds with your 1377. Great for follow up shots!


  26. I've owned my 1377C now for 3 yrs.If I could only have one airgun this would be it. I've slowly modified it into what I want and it's all you need. I ended up with a 1389 in .177 but could have went .22 instead. Everyone should own one of these. I get groups inside a dime at 10M-5pumps. It's a real vermin viper


  27. I want to add a longer barrel to my 1377, but it looks like the stock front site also plugs the air chamber. If I put on an 18 inch barrel, what do I need to cap the air chamber, and what supplemental brackets to support the barrel might I need?



  28. Here's how to make the pumping action quieter, i.e. no 'clacking' when the pump handle hits the barrel, just a gentle thud.

    Get some bicycle inner tube from MegloMart, preferably the large/wide 2"+ type. Clean the pump handle of excess oil with cleaning alcohol. Add some friction tape to the underside of the pump handle to help maintain the position of the rubber inner when pumping.

    Cut the inner tube to length and place on the pump handle. You will need to cut a trigger guard notch to allow the handle to close fully. Be careful and progressive with your cuts as too much and the handle starts to 'clack' again. You may find a small slit at the opposite end helps reduce tension near the fulcrum. Don't let the rubber interfere with the pump linkage.

    Now you have non-slip pump handle that absorbs most of the noise when you bring the handle fully home. If the handle releases by itself you will need to cut a little more rubber from the trigger guard end. Experiment as you have plenty of left over tube!

    Enjoy!

    And don't forget to add Pellgun Oil to enhance velocity.


  29. After reading this report, I was amazed by the goodnees of the pistol; and speaking of really affordable, working, and accurate guns, I have found one of them, thanks to all of you..but the next question is, can anyone recommend me other guns like this? inexpensive, yet very remarkable. thanks very much – JD



  30. JD,

    I shoot both the 1377 and the P17. The 1377 is my choice when I've got a little critter problem. The P17 looks cool and fits my hand like they were made for each other. The P17 has the better trigger and sights, but is harder for me to load. If you can swing both go for it.

    By the way JD, B.B. writes a daily blog where alot of folks ask and answer questions, trade info about what does and doesn't work, and generally help each other out. Your post was on a blog written in 2008, not many peple are checking the old blogs. Come join us at http://www.pyramydair.com/blog/. Looking fwd to hearing from you. Let us know what you think about the P17.

    Mr B.


  31. Have heard some folks say the standard peep sight for the 1377c is not usable. Finally got around to looking at using the peep feature.

    Found the hole is too small for my old eyes. Drilled it out and now it works very will.

    DB


  32. Yes, I know that this is an old blog. But I saw the blog on the 1377 and just had to comment on the trigger. It is the easiest mod in the world to do on an airgun. All you have to do is remove the grip panel, remove the triger spring, and slightly compress a few coils. I did this and my gun now has a trigger pull of about 2 lbs. All you have to do if you decide that you want to change it again is to compress or streach the spring.


  33. I am just getting into airguns again. I have a custom shop 2240 and love it. I do wish Crosman would put the 13xx in their custom shop. I would have one with a 14 inch 22cal barrel and a shoulder stock (plus the regular pistol grip). Perfect for backpacking in the Northwest.

    As to the 1377 pump slap. I just put two half inch diameter cork buttons on the handle, they are the kind you get to keep things from scratching your furniture.

    I have an old 1377 with the sliding hood. Rust(not bad rust, more like oily water sludge) has destroyed the plastic and broken the plastic breach. Can I put a new steel breach on it and keep the back pull cocking piece?


  34. Hungtinguy,

    welcome back. Unfortunately, you've posted your question onto a blog written a year and a half ago. Only a core of volunteers monitor these older blogs so you won't get much exposure here. First, I suggest you go to this url:

    www.http://airgun-academy.pyramydair.com/blog

    This is the most current blog which is published 5 days a week. Post your question there (just scroll down to the end of the FIRST blog and click on "comments"). Off topic questions and comments are always welcome and you'll get thousands of people looking at your comment. Second, I suggest going to the Crosman website (www.crosman.com) and click on their custom shop link to see what's available. They have developed into a very customer oriented company. I personally can't answer your question, not being familiar with the 1377.

    Fred PRoNJ


  35. huntingguy

    Follow FRED's advice and post further questions on the current day's blog.

    Many people including myself have implored Crosman to add the 1377/1322 to the custom shop. They will not listen so far. It is much to their detriment.

    I am sorry to inform you that you cannot upgrade your older style 1377 to the steel breech with bolt handle. This is a frequently asked question on the Crosman forum.

    http://www.network54.com/Index/12861

    In spite of this setback, you have decided to get back to airguns at a very good time. The choices and quality available now are unprecedented.


  36. B.B.,
    I got a 1377c and love it-it's a great, fun little shooter. However, the rivet/bolt that keeps the pumping lever attached to the air reservoir near the muzzle worked its way out of place on the first gun I had (after about 800 pellets), so I returned it for a replacement gun.

    Unfortunately I'm seeing the same thing is happening to the new gun. Have you (or anyone else reading this) heard about this? I hope this issue can be resolved as I really enjoy shooting this gun!





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