A blast from the past: Balderdash, March 1994

by B.B. Pelletier

Before we begin, I’m heading to Ohio today to be at the Pyramyd Air moving sale tomorrow. Please stop by if you can, and please introduce yourselves, so I know who I have met.

The early issues of The Airgun Letter had a “Balderdash” column, where I would quote a widely held/believed myth and present evidence to either prove or refute it–a sort of early Mythbusters. Here’s the first one I wrote in March 1994.

MYTH #1:
The .22 pellet is inherently less accurate than the other calibers.

I love this one. “Why is it less accurate?” you ask.

“Well,” they say, “it just is. That’s how things go, sometimes; you know how it is. Bigger calibers are less accurate.”

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The airguns of my youth

by B.B. Pelletier

Before we start, I wanted to tell you about a huge price reduction on the Gamo Viper Express Air Shotgun & Rifle. Pyramyd Air has dropped the price by $60. Get yours while supplies last. If you’ve got carpenter bees, this might do the trick!

Guest blogger
This is Alan’s first guest blog for us. He’s been a lover of air power from an early age. He’ll take us down memory lane today, and I’m sure this will bring up fresh childhood memories for many of you. Enjoy!

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

Bloggers must be proficient in the simple html that Blogger software uses, know how to take clear photos and size them for the internet (if their post requires them) and they must use proper English. We will edit each submission, but we won’t work on any submission that contains gross misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

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You know you’re an airgunner if…

by B.B. Pelletier

Guest blogger
In the same vein as Jeff Foxworthy’s “you might be a redneck if…,” my wife, Edith, would like to share her observations of how to identify a dyed-in-the-wool airgunner.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

Bloggers must be proficient in the simple html that Blogger software uses, know how to take clear photos and size them for the internet (if their post requires them) and they must use proper English. We will edit each submission, but we won’t work on any submission that contains gross misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

by Edith (Mrs. B.B.)

When we were publishing the Airgun Letter, I noticed that airgunners are often drawn to the same things. While going to airgun shows, my husband would find lots of common ground with airgunners on things unrelated to airgunning. It was uncanny how many guys liked the same things.

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Carpenter bees

by B.B. Pelletier

One of the most obnoxious pests of warm weather is the carpenter bee. They are a large insect, somewhat larger than a bumblebee, with a hard, shiny beetle-like body. The ones in Maryland that I used to do battle with had white spots around their eyes, but I’ve seen others without them. [Males have white or yellow faces. Females do not.]

They are called carpenter bees because they bore round holes in raw wood. Painted wood controls them to a great extent. We had a rail fence between us and one neighbor that was the perfect place for them to build homes. Wikipedia says they don’t destroy structures, but I had to replace several rails from their constant boring, so I think whoever wrote that never saw an infestation like ours.

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Airguns – I’ll never test ‘em all!

by B.B. Pelletier

I’m writing this report at 3:30 a.m., because today and tomorrow I have a television show to tape. There is no more time left to test guns and to report on them, plus do all the other things I have to do! Hopefully this schedule will stabilize within a few months, but right now I am in the eyewall of the storm, and things are pretty busy.

I just answered a question from a new reader that sounds exactly like a hundred other questions I get every month. Have I tested such-and-such an air rifle? My answer was no, I haven’t tested that one (yet), but then it hit me–I PROBABLY NEVER WILL! Looking at my blog schedule and the guns I have waiting in the wings to test plus the other tests and experiments we are running, there’s no way I can ever test them all.

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2009 NRA Annual Meetings and Exhibits

by B.B. Pelletier

Every year the NRA holds its general membership meeting in a different major U.S. city to allow a portion of their 4 million members to attend. A trade-show exhibit is held in conjunction with these meetings to allow manufacturers of guns and related products to showcase their wares to the public. Admission is free to NRA members, and non-members can attend for a small fee. This year’s show was held in Phoenix.

While the space in the exhibit hall is only about one-fifth the size of the SHOT Show, the attendance is almost triple. I’m sure the NRA set a new record for attendance this year. The Phoenix Fire Marshall actually stopped people from entering the exhibit hall on Friday, the first day, because he felt the hall was over-crowded. They held things up for 45 minutes, all the while more people were walking in the front door to register. When they saw the situation was going to get worse, they opened the hall once more. And Friday wasn’t the busy day! On Saturday, a significantly larger crowd attended.

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A Steroid Streak

by B.B. Pelletier


Our Steroid Silver Steak had a prototype scope mount that held a Beeman SS-2 short scope.

I’m doing this report for Mr. B, but I suppose many of you multi-pump shooters will be interested. In the world of Sheridan Blue Streaks and Silver Streaks there are two modifications that make the gun different. One is the pump-assist gun, and that modification is really applied to a Benjamin 392 instead of a Streak. The two guns are very similar except for the caliber. A Sheridan Streak is always .20 caliber.

The pump-assist gun develops the same power as the stock rifle, but the pump strokes are easier–especially the last few. There haven’t been very many of them produced, and they’re no longer being sold by Pyramyd Air, so that version is now in the collectible realm.

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