SAM 10-meter target pistol – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


I’ve begun familiarizing myself with the SAM 10.

Before I begin, thank you for all your suggestions about my failure with the Massimo yesterday. I think Kevin came closest when he said I was too rushed. I’m sure it sounded like that in my writing. And I felt rushed. But I also was stumped about the results I got, and you guys have given me plenty of things to think about. Now, on to today’s report.

In the time since the last report, I’ve been adjusting and shooting my new SAM 10. I loaded most of the mandatory 500-gram trigger-pull weight into the first stage of the trigger, so stage two breaks with about an additional 50 grams or so. The rear sight notch had to be widened a bit, so I could see some daylight on either side of the front post. That helped me pick up exactly where the front sight is against the bull. And I’ve dry-fired the gun several hundred times. I also shot 20 pellets at an actual 10-meter target, and the results weren’t too pretty, I can tell you.

I’m currently testing pellets to discover the most accurate style and size. But that’s not what today is about. Today, we’ll see what kind of velocity the pistol has.

Filling the gun
The SAM 10 came with two air tanks that screw into the front of the receiver. They had to be filled, so I attached the adapter to a Hill pump and started pumping. The SAM can take a fill of 300 bar, but the first fill was only to 200 bar (2900 psi). That should be good for around 100 shots because 300 bar gets you about 220 shots.

Funny story about filling 10-meter tanks–and this also applies to target rifle tanks. The tanks do not contain the firing valve. All they have is a retention valve, so they can be removed from the gun at any time. When they’re screwed into the gun or into the fill adapter, a valve stem at the end of the tank is opened mechanically and the tank can be filled. That’s important to know, because it determines how you connect to the scuba tank or pump. When connecting, the bleed screw MUST be closed; as the tank is screwed home, the valve opens and the tank exhausts air. That air will be contained in the hose and base of the pump unless you leave the bleed screw open–which I did, the first time I filled a tank. Before I could react, the tank emptied itself. Because I was using the pump to fill the tank, the lesson was ingrained in my consciousness on the first try.

Vogel target pellets
Vogel pellets have an interesting history. They used to be made in Germany, but Scott Pilkington brought the brand to the United States and now makes the pellets in Monteagle, Tennessee. Vogels have won top honors in World Cup competition in the past, and I took the opportunity of Scott being at the Roanoke airgun show this year to buy a tin for evaluation. I bought the pellets with a 4.50mm diameter head. They weigh 8.1 grains.

Vogels averaged 450 f.p.s. with a spread from 444 to 460. Fourteen feet per second seems a bit high for a regulated gun, but that may not have any affect on accuracy.

RWS R10 pellets
RWS R10 8.2-grain pellets averaged 453 f.p.s., with a spread from 442 to 462. Now, 20 f.p.s. is a very large velocity spread for a regulated gun. It won’t affect accuracy at 10 meters, but I’d still like to see a lower number. The head size is 4.50mm.

JSB Match S100
JSB Match S100 pellets were next. This is a JSB pellet that Pyramyd Air used to stock and may still do so, but they’re out as of this time. They weigh 8.2 grains and averaged 462 f.p.s., with a spread from 457 to 470. That’s a little tighter, but still not what I expected from this gun. This pellet has a 4.52mm head size and may perform differently in the gun.

H&N Finale Match
The next pellet I shot was an H&N Finale Match. This was the light one, at 7.6 grains weight. they averaged 484 f.p.s. with a tight spread from 479 to 487. These are a 4.50mm head size.

Adjustable power
You may recall that one of the many adjustments this pistol has is for velocity. To access the adjustment you must first remove the grips. The adjustment screw is located at the rear of the receiver. Screw in for more velocity and out for less. For this evaluation, I decided to use the H&N Match pellets, because at present they are shooting fastest in the pistol.


The adjustment screw for power/velocity is at the back of the receiver. The grips must come off to get to it.

With one complete turn in on the power screw, the velocity increased to 505 f.p.s. Another full turn did not advance it at all. That was also the limit the screw could be turned in. So, 505 is the top speed with this particular pellet. Two complete turns in the other direction took me back to the start, and the speed was 482 f.p.s. That’s close enough to the average to be right on. One turn to the negative, and the speed dropped to 469. One more turn, and the speed dropped to 411. The gun didn’t sound as though it liked that speed very much. It just sounded hollow and a bit flat. Hard to describe, but if you had been in the room you would have heard it. Two turns back to the start, and the speed was 486 f.p.s. So, once again, right on.

Performance with the spare tank
What the heck…I decided to install the spare tank–the one without the manometer– and see if the velocity was still in the same range. I couldn’t, though, because there was no air in the tank. It had bled down entirely from a 200-bar fill the week before. The tank should hold a full charge indefinitely, so this one has to go in for repairs. In the U.S., Scott Pilkington at pilkguns.com is the best 10-meter repair station around. Scott travels with the U.S. Olympic team and services their airguns at every Olympics. I would trust him to do anything on my gun.

Where are we?
Well, I now know a lot more about the pistol than I did. And I’ve adjusted it pretty close to how I want it, though there’s still some grip work to be done. Now, I have to learn how to shoot 10-meter all over again. Fortunately, there are a couple of instructional tutorials on the internet that I can follow :-)

41 thoughts on “SAM 10-meter target pistol – Part 2

  1. The temporary arrival of American Airgunner to the Versus network means I got to watch my first show this morning. Great stuff! I'd love to see this as a regular Versus feature.

    The fly-on-the-target sequence was a lot of fun. Keep up the great work!


  2. Phil,

    What a surprise and opportunity that shot fly shot was! That fly just kept landing on the target paper and Paul knew how far off he had to aim. People don't believe stories of shots like that, but I was sitting right next to Paul when he did it. No editing involved.

    There have been other even more fabulous shots that I hope make it to the air. The most amazing was a 102-yard hit on a field target with a 1.5-inch kill zone. First Hans Apelles did it twice with a 16 foot-pound Crosman Marauder, then is son Ray did it twice with a 12 foot-pound Marauder. I have never witnessed a better shot than that in my life.

    B.B.


  3. B.B.

    Read your blog on cold bluing and the thing that got me the most was the marks left by the foam inserts from the gun safe. I just purchased a safe with the same kind of foam inserts and have had my rifles in them for less than 30 days. I already noticed that there was some discoloration on the barrels. Any advice on what to replace the foam with so I won't have a rust or bluing problem ? I really like the safe and want to keep the rifles secure but don't want rust.
    David



  4. All,
    Wayne's free use TF97 is up for grabs again. I've had it quite long enough. The link below will give you a remind of the history of this air rifle.

    http://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2009/03/testing-tuned-tech-force-97.html

    About shipping… the original shipping box is a pile of pulp. So we'll have to work out a shipping box. I'll make one or you can spring for a gun case. This will be your call. Though I think I'll seperate the stock and action for shipping to protect it better.

    Just post here. As before first I'll take it gets it. You pay shipping.


  5. BB – In past blogs, most of your problems like this have been some sort of mechanical problem – loose scope, loose stock, etc. Maybe this time there's a loose nut on the trigger (LOL)




  6. Kevin,

    This is in response to your comment yesterday on the R-8 and the scope it came with. I haven't the foggiest idea. BB and perhaps a lurker or two who are avid collectors, might know. I'll check my Blue Book tonight to see if the R-8 came with a scope in some iterations.

    By the way, Auto Electric is about 2 hours away from me in PA (Pennsylvania) and I'm in Jersey. The correct name of the owner is John Tripier. He told me he was the past PA Champion at one point and produced a beautiful FT (field target) rifle for me to look at (which wasn't for sale and for the life of me, I can't remember the make and model).

    I know I won't be the only one to ask but what is the scatt system for 10M air pistol?


  7. Fred,

    Thanks for the reply. I looked in the blue book and there's no mention of the R-8 scope combo package deal. I think the original owner just bought a scope (the RWS?) at the time he purchased the new R-8.

    Wish the blue book of airguns had a section on vintage scopes. Many of the vintage scopes (beeman blue ribbon, tasco custom shop, discontinued leupold's, etc.) values should be tracked as well.

    kevin


  8. I really shouldn't be reading about air pistols. Thought I was immune to getting interested in a pcp pistol but this one has sparked some interest.

    It seems that I could spend a year playing with all the adjustments on that pistol.

    I need professional counseling.

    kevin



  9. Kevin,

    Congrats on your new R8, she's quite a beauty and your excitement is palpable. You are much too modest about your photography, you caught some great detail in those photos. Except for that last one. Where was that one taken from, outer space?;^)

    The same thing nearly happened to me with a mountain bike. Had it over a year. Finally I made up some wacky reason I had to have it back for such and such a weekend.
    Maybe one fine day you will be reunited.


  10. Kevin,

    Then it's time for you to check into Gentle Edith's Pneumatic Rest Home and Sanatorium, located in Breakwynd Indiana, on the sloping banks of the Alimentary canal. There is a noisy neighbor who performs experiments in his chicken coop, but given the nature of your disorder, they shouldn't bother you.

    B.B.


  11. B.B.,

    When you get a chance would you please let us Know what a SCATT system is? The only one I know about is used to identify animals.

    Just had a thought about the Norico Massio and was wondering if the crown is bad?

    Mr B.



  12. Mr. B.,

    SCATT is one of many companies that have perfected computer-based training systems for target shooters. Russians and European shooters use these systems a lot more than Americans, though perhaps when you get up to the national level that changes.

    Google it

    SCATT and pistol

    B.B.


  13. kevin,

    Perhaps Gentle Edith's place will set a ward aside for all of us. Just think: indoor and outdoor ranges, the more guns you bring the lower your monthly charges.

    For those of you who like to fish we've got the canal that flows through the property–just don't eat the fish. Do you think your fish biologist can help us clean up the canal?

    Mr B.


  14. Mr B.,

    Gentle Edith's place sounds wonderful.

    Think I'll pass on fishing the canal. I've spent alot of time in my youth doing that.

    Truth be told, my fishing haven is my sanitarium. Works wonders at recharging the soul.

    kevin



  15. Fred,

    No, we have not sold our rest home for airgunners. We do, however, have an agreement with Wacky Wayne that our members can visit his facility at no charge & vice versa.

    Edith



  16. Well, I can't find a definition for scattological, but there is such a word "scatological". You ready for this? Read it quick before the powers that be delete it:

    1. the study of or preoccupation with excrement or obscenity.
    2. obscenity, esp. words or humor referring to excrement.
    3. the study of fossil excrement.

    How old is Wayne?

    Fred







  17. Hay FRED,

    I'm about 2 hours from Media (I'm up near the first exit of the NE Extension). I didn't know there were any Air Rifle shops in the Northeast! (although JM is about 3 hours from me). Tell me more about this shop!


  18. JC,

    Auto Electric airguns is a very small hole in the wall shop run by this gentleman, John Tropier. John used to run a NAPA shot (hence the Auto part of the name) but sold the shop and toured Europe, mainly the UK, visiting different manufacturers. He watched the rifles and guns being made and learned how to repair them and probably a bunch of other tricks. He'll joke about Wembleys, calling them Wobblies. He's very good on English and Scandinavian and Crosman guns and repairs. He's also the center for paintballers in the immediate area.

    Typically you have to call ahead and tell him what you'd like to buy as his in-store stock is very small. I like dealing with John. He lets you try out whatever you're interested in first before you buy. He also sets up the rifle or gun, does the "BB" routine by cleaning out the barrel and sighting the rifle in for you – with or without a scope, however you've ordered it.

    He's definitely no where as big or varied as PA but for repairs and just dropping by and talking, he's a very nice guy.

    John's address is 206 South Orange Street – behind the buildings that border South Orange Street (I told you it's a hole in the wall). His number is 610 565-9498. Call to make sure he'll be in as he's been battling prostate cancer and the treatments have left him very fatigued.

    Fred


  19. In a less scatalogical (but more precise) vein, I just invoiced a big Web site development job, and was thinking of rewarding myself with a new sporter-class 10 meter gun.

    The Crosman Challenger has been extensively reviewed here (now that Crosman's made good on my defective Marauder, I feel better about the platform), but is the Air Force Edge available yet?

    Has anyone played with one?

    Any reason to prefer one over the other (e.g. – will I be able to dry fire the Challenger)?

    Feelings, opinions, feature-mongering and drug-induced hallucinations all appreciated…


  20. The Trout Underground,

    Congradulations on your invoice and the "problem" that it has given you. Have fun researching and making your choice. I cann't help you with it except to say that you should repost it on today's blog so more folks will see it.

    Mr B.


  21. Trout Underground,

    I have a production Edge that I will soon be blogging. Soon should mean this month, though it may be December before they start shipping. I don't want to start blogging long before the product is available.

    There is a lot to recommend the Edge. Some innovation, as well. The trigger is wonderful, much like the Challenger 2009.

    Of course you have read my report on the Challenger, so you know what you are getting there.

    I can't go into specifics yet, as I don't want to give anything away before the blog, and because I haven't done all the testing yet.

    B.B.


  22. Hell, I thought this *was* today's blog post. A mistake of this magnitude could damage the illusion of online omnipotence I've built up with my clients, so I'm afraid I'll have to kill anyone who reads this.

    Sorry. Just has to be this way.

    I'll repost right away…


  23. "I have a production Edge that I will soon be blogging. Soon should mean this month, though it may be December before they start shipping. I don't want to start blogging long before the product is available."

    God, you're a tease. I knew a girl like you in college. Just saying is all.

    Can you tell me how the two compare in size & weight? I'm an adult (well, sometimes), so a bigger, heavier gun would be better…

    Thanks for the update!


  24. The Trout Underground,

    It wasn't Mr B. who read and pointed out the way your question was posted to the wrong blog.

    Have you considered the possibility that your competition snuck in and rewired your key board?

    Mr oops Anonymous


  25. Trout Underground,

    This is how you readers get me to write a blog report without writing it.

    The Edge weighs about 6 lbs. and has a very unique optional weight system that allows you to add weight almost anywhere n the gun. There is no limit to the weight that can be added, but 7.5 lbs. is the limit for the sporter class.

    No more questions!

    B.B.



  26. Thanks for reviewing this beauty and bringing GDR made airguns to the US.

    I'm a proud owner of two Haenel 310.
    One in original stock as seen in the review but with a windage adjustment on the rear sight ( they're exchangeable ) and the second one in a Mauser K98 carbine stock ( makes it look like real meanie :D ).

    The velocity tests must have been the result of a worn out spring b/c the average v0 of the 310 should range between 130-140 meters/s. There is the possibility to exchange the standard spring for a more powerfull w/o harming the piston seal giving you v0 of about 155 meters/s – that's 500-odd fps.

    Like the mentioned Diana 30 or the Anschütz 275 the Haenel 310 was a very common rifle for shooting galleries.
    In fact I saw them recently in some shooting galleries at a funfair in my hometown :)
    Also it was a training rifle for the para-military GST – Gesellschaft für Sport & Technik ( Society for Sports & Technics )
    during the GDR. It was manufactured between 1960 – 1989 in different qualities:

    Q1: export quality (best)
    S in triangle: standard (solid)
    1 in triangle: very good
    2 in triangle: below standard

    I can recall shooting either this model or the legendary Schmeisser patented model 33-junior in the summer camps when I was age 11-13.
    The springs in the shooting gallery versions were of course "castrated" so that a li'l boy could cock the thing.

    Hugo Schmeisser once was the main engineer and co-owner of the company C.G. Haenel founded in 1840 in Suhl/Thuringia Germany.
    So the Haenel-arrow trademark bears quite some history.

    Some links regarding Haenel air-rifles…

    spare parts and restorations:

    http://www.waffencenter-gotha.de/shop/HAENEL-what-else/HAENEL:::168_169.html

    …a shop by a young gunsmith who is specialised on Haenel rifles and got hold of truckloads of spare parts. He also takes care of your rifle and restores old and worn out rifles (like those from a shooting gallery)

    http://gunmaker.org/index.html
    …these are actually gunsmiths that built the Haenel airguns.

    Greetings from Haenel-county,
    Thuringia in the heartland of Germany

    Michael


  27. Michael,

    Wow! What a load of information you have on the 310! You just taught me so much I didn't know. I knew about the Schmeisser 33, but not that the 310 was ever used in galleries or that there were (are?) mainsprings of differing power levels.

    More, please. How can we get you to be a guest blogger? Our readers will eat your words like cake, I mean kuchen.

    B.B.


  28. Michael,

    What a great comment. The links are terrific. I'd never heard of waffencenter-gotha.de/shop and they have over 800 parts for a haenel!!

    Great job.

    kevin


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