Daisy 888 Medalist 10-meter rifle

by B.B. Pelletier

Update on Tom/B.B.: Tom has moved out of ICU to a regular room, is able to get out of bed and walk unaided for several steps, have visitors other than family and is eating real food. It’s the simple things in life that bring us joy!

Let’s move on to today’s blog, which is about the Daisy Avanti 888 Medalist. Today’s blog originally appeared in the November 2000 issue of The Airgun Letter.


The 888 Medalist’s laminated stock is in sharp contrast to what Daisy usually turns out.

I was pleased to receive one of the first production model 888 Daisy 10-meter rifles from the Avanti line.

Is the Daisy better than the new Crosman Challenger? I won’t answer that directly, because I don’t believe there’s a single correct answer. Both guns have features never before seen in youth-market target guns. I’ll try to point out the Daisy’s features for coaches and parents, so they can make a reasonable choice between two fine target rifles.

The first technical feature is perhaps the biggest difference between the two. Where the Crosman uses either high-pressure air or bulk-fill CO2, the Avanti 888 is a bulk-fill CO2 gun only, operating from a screw-in 2.5-oz. tank. The Crosman gets approximately 70 shots per tank on air (at 530 fps), and the Daisy gets hundreds of shots per CO2 tank (at 560 fps). That’s pretty incredible when you consider the power source.

Daisy Avanti 888 Medalist
.177 10-meter rifle
Muzzle 1′ from start screen, 10 shots, 66 deg. F

Chinese light wadcutters, 7.6 grains
High…..581 f.p.s.
Low …..573 f.p.s.
Average…..578 f.p.s.
Extreme spread….. 8 f.p.s.
Standard deviation…..2 f.p.s.
Muzzle energy…..5.64 ft.-lbs.

H&N Finale Match, 8.1 grains
High…..587 f.p.s.
Low….. 582 f.p.s.
Average…..584 f.p.s.
Extreme spread …..5 f.p.s.
Standard deviation…..1 f.p.s.
Muzzle energy…..6.14 ft.-lbs.


Five shots with Chinese lightweight wadcutters (left) were okay; but in the 888, H&N Finale Match pellets stole the show!

Not only is the velocity high, the shot-to-shot consistency is quite remarkable. It’s as good as a top precharged target rifle with a good regulator. These shots were chronographed well into the charge, so there’s no special effect being derived from the first few shots after the fill. This, plus the pinpoint accuracy with H&N pellets, was quite a surprise.

Daisy’s web site says the gun shoots 500 f.p.s., so perhaps ours was a bit hot. Still, I liked the extra speed and would hope it was there on any gun I owned.

The 888 is built on the 853 action. A long, skinny gas reservoir fits where the 853 pump lever and compression tube would be; and it unscrews for filling, so Daisy sent a wrench to loosen it.


You’ll need a fill device to pressurize the Medalist’s bulk-fill CO2 tank. This one is made by Kingman.

Because of the narrow diameter of the separate CO2 reservoir, an hour’s pre-chill in the freezer helped introduce more liquid CO2 into the tank, though I never got close to the rated 2.5 oz. Even so, the 1.6 oz. that did go in were enough for hundreds of shots.


The 853 receiver is used, but cocking is easier and the trigger seems crisper.

Daisy sells the rifle with the same aperture rear sight that comes standard on the 853, but I would assume most buyers will upgrade to the better unit made by Gamo. The Daisy sight requires three adjustment clicks in the direction you want to move to take out the slack. Of course, if you have to move it more in the same direction, there’s no more slack.

The stock is laminated wood and has a solid feel. Together with a most functional muzzle weight, the rifle balances well, with a slight but noticeable muzzle-heaviness. The laminate stock does add some weight. The 888 weighs about 6.9 lbs., so coaches and parents should consider that. By comparison, the 853 pneumatic is about 1.5 lbs. less.

Along the bottom of the stock is a functional accessory rail for a sling mount. It’s indexed so the rifle can be quickly returned to any setting–always a plus when many shooters have to share equipment.

The trigger will be a welcome change to those who now compete with an 853. It’s lighter and crisper than the pneumatic. No doubt there will be some popular mods for it in a short time, because it is not adjustable, as far as I can tell.

Another happy point is the cocking effort. The 853 is a real bear in this department, but the 888 is a dream. That will keep young shooters fresher during a match–to say nothing of the huge advantage of not having to pump the gun for every shot. Heavy or not, the 888 is better-suited than the 853 for young shooters.

The pellet trough is still a bit small for adult fingers because this is an 853 action. It helps place the pellet on the right side of the receiver, where it’s flat, and roll the pellet into the trough. Once there, the bolt pushes it smoothly into the breech.

The bottom line is that Daisy has built a winning rifle.

73 Responses to “Daisy 888 Medalist 10-meter rifle”

  • Mr B. Says:

    Good morning Edith and B.B.,

    Starting the day with good news about Tom is a wonderful way to start my day.

    Mr B.

  • rikib Says:

    Edith
    Glad to hear about Tom's progress! Getting up and about is a really good for your ego in the hospital. Prays still heading your way!

    Kevin
    Either I missed it or you were enough of a gentlemen to drop the somewhat aggressive statements made against you (concerning your collecting) without response. Reminds me of a tidbit post I made earlier "Don't argue with an idiot; people watching may not be able to tell the difference." Well that was just the way I felt reading the post going back and forth.
    rikib

  • Anonymous Says:

    Superb news….he is making good progress….try and give hime something to eat that he loves, if the docs okay it that is ….
    He'll be very happy.

    Great news towards the end of great day here …….

    Manish
    Mumbai
    India

  • woguph Says:

    Hi Edith,
    Please tell Tom we are praying for him to recover soon. I hope he will be well enough to go to the airgun show but I am afraid that it now sounds like a long shot. Maybe I can drive him up in an ambulance and prop him up in a hospital bed at the show. It's funny how unimportant things like airguns or the show become when you are faced with serious illness. It does put things into proper perspective.

    David Enoch

  • FRED Says:

    AlanL,

    there are plenty of articles on the internet on building your own spring compressor. I built mine using a 1"x8", a couple of pieces off a 2"x4"
    some 3/8" bolts and wing nuts, regular nuts and a cheap chinese C clamp with the top of the clamp sawed off just at the top bend, leaving only the screw and part of the frame (so I could attach to the 1"x8" board. Cost was under $10 (C clamp and wing nuts) Worked fine for disassembly of the RWS 350.

    But, since none of your rifles need any work, don't bother – yet. Just shoot the heck out of them!

    Fred PRoNJ

  • DaveUK Says:

    Fred:
    I do need to build one of those myself and soon.
    My former workshop assistant(Wife)has resigned in disgust at the hole I made in the living room ceiling when the spring shot out my springer.
    I said to her,
    "Well if you had kept your head in the way we wouldn't have the hole in the ceiling problem.lol"
    Seriously though it would be nice to be able to experiment on my Springer virtualy whenever I wanted.

    Out of ICU.Brilliant news.Onwards an upwards BB.

  • Volvo Says:

    AlanL,
    Yes, your HW30S will have the same trigger as all HW’s as along as it is an “S”, without the “ S” it would get the Perfect trigger which is not nearly as nice. The Rekord has been available for decades and is one of the fine features of the HW’s. The Rekord is silver with two large adjustment screws, unmistakable in appearance.

    Please don’t adjust your HW30S’s trigger for a heavier pull. You have simply accustomed yourself to the equivalent of tasting of 99 cent frozen pizza and now are overwhelmed by a real pizza pie from the hands of an Italian Nonna.

    I was able to go from shooting my R1 to the HW97K to the HW50S to the R7 without the need to adjust for a different pull. The downside was I became so use to the feel of those Rekords after PW’s polished them that when I acquired another rifle, even a legend like the FWB124, I was usually very disappointed in the trigger.

  • AlanL Says:

    Edith,

    Nice! Keep him walking! Nothing speeds recovery so much as activity. My wife swears by it and she has five surgery's worth of experience to back it up. Hopefully he can get his gall bladder removed any day now, and be back home to the comfort of his CO2-filled sleep number bed.

    It'll be great to see B.B.'s first blog back. He will have had a long time to think about it.

    Fred,

    Thanks. I was just looking for an excuse to take Volvo up on his $19.95 offer. ;-)

    Kevin, Volvo,

    Astonishing how apropos the remark about not arguing with an idiot is, huh?!

    -AlanL

  • rikib Says:

    Slinging Lead
    Looks like your black truck maybe black again and my red wrangler change back to red, weather permitting. How is it up there so far? Got one to send you from my mum.
    rikib

  • Volvo Says:

    Confused? They saying goes perception is reality. But is it really? Perhaps.

    My attempt to shame Kevin into sending me his just received R8 could be misconstrued as some sort of verbal assault, instead of the obvious humor it is meant to convey. Reflecting inward, I am left to decide if I should only post with comments that are sure to be understood by the masses. Anyone care to venture a guess on my choice?

  • Wayne Says:

    How wonderful to check the blog and see Tom is up and walking about!

    I'm with you David… Airguns loose their luster real quick when our loving master or one of the flock is not well.

    I practice, but my heart is heavy…. little prayers with each shot:-)

    Wacky Wayne

  • FRED Says:

    DaveUK,

    I can also show you how to repair large holes in wallboard like a pro :).

    Seriously, my compressor is quick and dirty piece of work. There are some works of art to be found on the internet. BB posted plans for a spring compressor here:

    http://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2006/07/spring-gun-tuning-part-2building.html

    While his is a super sturdy one, mine is a lot more flimsy but I thought would do the trick since we aren't dealing with garage door springs. The only holes in my sheetrock are from errant pellets from my Gamo Compact

    Fred PRoNJ

  • Wayne Says:

    Volvo,

    I got your wry humor.. I love it.. don't stop..

    I tried last night to add to it.. but alas… your un topable:-)

    and I only get on top of my wife;-)

    Wacky Wayne

  • Volvo Says:

    Wayne,

    Thank you for your support, but perhaps you shared a tad too much? :0)

    I imagine the raised bed business is booming right now, which reminds me I need to get to work.
    Take care.

  • BG_Farmer Says:

    Edith,
    Happy to hear Tom is on the upswing.

    Volvo,
    Been raining:); I've been thinking about the spring compressor, and have some pretty good ideas. I don't think I'll use a C-clamp, just some all thread or a big bolt (with handle/crank) on T-nut bearings in a block on one end, similar to one I saw online. Instead of the round surfaces many compressors have on the support block(s), I'm thinking V-notches are better, because they will better accommodate a wider range of tube sizes; for the nominal size, the round would be optimal in terms of contact, otherwise V-notches should be similar. 24" capacity between ends seems to be adequate?

  • BG_Farmer Says:

    Wayne,
    You and my jack appear to be suffering the same seasonal affliction. I thought it was: In spring when young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love… Apparently its more the cantakerous old things that turn, and not so lightly! By the way, this is intended to be humorous and not a personal insult.

  • Vince Says:

    DaveUK, I was working (without a compressor!) on, I think, an old Diana 45. All the spring retaining pins were out but the spring wasn't releasing (too much friction between the modular trigger and the tube).

    I put a screwdriver in place of one of the pins and draped a T-shirt over the end of the tube. I pulled out the driver and tapped the tube – the spring shot out oh, about 1-2' or so. Not nearly as dramatic!

    A large old rag is always a good safeguard against unexpected spring release…

  • Wayne Says:

    Volvo,

    Yes, gardening with raised beds is a growing market.. and we be growing with it!

    Ain't it nice to say, "I've got to get to work"??

    BG_Farmer,

    My affliction is not seasonal.. I'm addicted to loving my wife year round.

    ..and I have no problem being likened to a stubborn mule:-) .. many of our LLC members would agree:-)… as well as my wife!

    Wacky Wayne

  • AlanL Says:

    B.B., Volvo, anyone:
    If you had to choose between a Weihrauch HW80 and HW85, which would it be?
    Thanks!
    -AlanL

  • DaveUK Says:

    Fred:
    I did a fairly decent job on the ceiling repair but I do catch my wife looking up at it on the odd occasion.
    That's when I quote from 'Naked Gun'.
    "Nothing to see here.move along".

    Vince:
    What actualy happened was,that I had added a quarter inch Nut behind the spring(don't ask me why)on an earlier experiment.
    With me taking the strain my wife knocked out the retaining pin and to my suprise nothing happened,no strain.
    That is, till I took my hands away and then POW.
    It was I think,the rear of the tube or the quarter inch nut that did the damage.
    In all the confusion it was hard to tell.

  • BG_Farmer Says:

    DaveUK,
    Few things spice up a marriage like a husband doing accidental property damage. My wife loves to point out how forgiving she is:).

  • rikib Says:

    Edith, thanks for all you have done since Tom has been out of commission. You've done a great job.

    Maybe just me but seems as if some bloggers are becoming overly sarcastic (maybe they miss Tom too much!). What was that saying "Can't we all just get along", we all love airgunning that's why we're here.

    Joking around is okay, but we should not put each other down (even in jest).

    I'm new to this so you can put me in my place. This is just my opinion, and we all know that opinions are like —- everyone has one and they all stink! Mine included.

  • rikib Says:

    BG_Farmer
    accidental property damage! I've done more of that than I'll ever admit!
    rikib

  • pete zimmerman Says:

    There has been some recent discussion of the Daisy match/sporter rifles on targettalk.org. A fair amount has been on the 888.

    -pz

  • DaveUK Says:

    Sorry guys if I am coming across as bit of a joker.
    I wish I could add to the wealth of knowledge you fellas have,but you will have forgoten more than I will ever know about Airgunning and firearms.
    I can only tell you about the incidents and accidents of a small time airgunner with aspirations. Who lives in an anti gun country and refuses to crawl to the state for a firearms licence and be subjected to the terms they impose.
    Someone get me a green card for heavans sake.Lol

  • Mike Says:

    Good for BB!

    Would like to take a moment to dispel any myths regarding presumed values for the force of thrust due to rapidly expanding gas expelled through a hole in a co2 cartridge. I haven't measured it, but I have felt it and it feels like about 8-10 lbs. It goes by so quick, that it's hard to say. Even though most people would agree that 8-10 lbs is not a lot of force, remember this: force = mass x acceleration and an 8-10 lb force applied to an object of small mass like a powerlet (a few grams – maybe an ounce or two at best, I would guess) can produce some pretty rapid acceleration. But most any 8-year old kid can hold on to 8-10 lbs with no problem. Here's a video showing that it is not difficult to restrain a powerlet as it blows. Here's a video that shows that a kid cannot hold onto one squeezing between his thumb and the tips of three fingers.

    Mike.

  • Anonymous Says:

    Edith,

    Glad to hear that Tom is walking but beware. He musn't take a bad fall. That has really hurt some friends and acquaintances. He should keep a cane or walker handy until he feels steady and never mind the appearances.

    AlanL, for your razor sharp rails, you may want to apply a ceramic sharpening rod of the kind that Frank B. gave me to dull them down. I thought of using the rod to remove some metal burrs that have appeared on the scope base of my Savage rifle. How's your 54 doing? What is the cure for being as strong as the Incredible Hulk?

    Volvo, I don't have a TV so have not been able to watch the Pacific series as it comes out. I watch all the tidbits they show on the official website, and I'll find a way to view the whole thing when it comes out in DVD. So far, my impressions are as follows. In a lot of ways it seems like Band of Brothers transferred to the Pacific. In other words, the personalities are like a frat house gone to war. Along with that go some painfully melodramatic speeches. However, I have it on good authority that high-spirited characters like these make for the best fighting men. Anyway after what they did, they can act however they want.

    I'm not particularly interested in their girl friends or personal hang-ups. I must be of a violent cast of mind….

    The battles are suggestively presented but they really cannot give the full flavor or detail of what happened. The presentation of the Battle on the Tenaru River on Guadalcanal was very truncated. And I am certain that they did not give all of the details of Basilone's heroics of rolling around in the dark to fix broken machine guns during a banzai charge and recapturing one of his guns by sailing into seven enemy soldiers with a machete and a .45.

    I will say that the equipment and uniforms are done very nicely and are a pleasure to watch. It makes me want to break out my M1 and Ka Bar.

    On the general subject of offending people, I think we are fouling afoul of a concept from literary theory that I read about called "the Antinomy of Aesthetic Distance." :-) The basic idea is that humor is funnier the more (closer) it is to seriousness and less funny the further away it gets–that is when you are obviously joking. For example, gross slapstick is supposed to cruder and generally less amusing than dry and understated humor.

    This being the case, there is always a tension between having some fun and being misunderstood. If you are always advertising jokes in advance, it is less fun. I don't know of any way to legislate this. I guess everyone should be sensitive on the one hand, tolerant on the other, and quick to clear up any apparent misunderstandings. So far so good, I think.

    Matt61

  • CJr Says:

    Edith,
    So very glad to hear about Tom's progress. Thanks for keeping us updated. I think we are all breathing much easier, now.

    This gun has piqued my interest. Some questions:

    1. PA add says to purchase fill device from Daisy yet I found it on the PA site. Something need updated? I'd much prefer to order from PA.

    2. What's the difference between the 888 and the 887? Stock only?

    3. Sounds like 100's of shots off a 2.4 oz bottle. Then I can fill it from a 12oz bottle and get approx 5 times 100's of shots? Sounds too good to be true.

    WV: comedai – plural for comedian? and plenty of those on this blog, me included :-)

    -C

  • rikib Says:

    DaveUK
    While I served in the USN I spent two tours in Wales. That was over 20 years ago. Things seemed so peaceful there (near ST. Brides Bay). Never really thought about guns. Weekends in or around London were a little different though, but somehow I felt safe there. I guess things have changed a lot. My wife is from Oxford and we talk with her mum every week, doesn't sound at all like the peaceful place I once knew.

  • rikib Says:

    Gotta go Tornado Watch!
    rikib

  • Slinging Lead Says:

    rikib

    Kevin and Volvo are old chums. They enjoy taking friendly jabs at each other out of mutual respect. Its all in fun.

    It can be difficult to properly analyze sarcasm, understatement, overstatement, meanness and good natured kidding around when you are reading something (like this blog) and don't know the author or have the author's voice, facial expressions or body language as cues or a frame of reference. Sometimes even a post that is merely short in length comes off as short in tone.

    I try and assume someone has the best of intentions when I can't figure out what exactly is meant by the vibe I am getting. I am usually right when I do this.

    If they ARE genuine jerks, I ignore them. There are few things so pathetic as a one-person pissing contest. (please forgive my language Edith)

    WV: belityp. belittle & type. Profound gibberish indeed.

  • AlanL Says:

    Matt61,

    I like only raw spinach, so Slinging Lead has maligned me with an undeserved rep for Popeye arms. Just because I break a pullrod or three… jeesh! The 54 is on its way to Glenn at Umarex with a scheduled arrival of Saturday, which means Monday. As soon as I hear from him I will let you all know.

    I have a ceramic rod. Hope I can dull those edges without scratching the tube while I'm at it. A precision tool in the hands of a klutz may as well be a sledgehammer in the hands of King Kong. No wait, ole K.K. had quite a delicate touch, didn't he? Oh well, like a sledge in the hands of… never mind!

    -AlanL

  • Slinging Lead Says:

    AlanL

    Thanks for your mini-review of the HW30s. I actually ordered one of these myself from PA not long ago on a whim, then I had a rare moment of clarity where I realized my gun closet was full, and my bank account was empty! A very rude realization. I had to cancel the order, much to my dismay.

    I am very surprised to hear about the crudeness of the dovetail. (stick to the apples, raw potatoes are disgusting)

    I am with Volvo on the trigger, leave it alone for now. Your Rekord is everything other triggers want to be. My TX200 has a copy, er… refinement of the Rekord trigger. When I first got it, I felt it was scary light. You will get used to it, then learn to love it, then DEPEND on it. It will become the trigger you judge all your other triggers against.

    Since your rifle has the globe front sight with all the inserts, and you don't like the rear sight (neither do I) may I suggest an aperature rear sight? They suck for hunting, but are just the ticket for target shooting.

    Awesome groups by the way, with your open sights. I could never do as well. They will only tighten up from here. Luckily, I am not from Missouri, and will not insist that you "show me!";^)

    Do not think you are off the hook, I expect further updates!

    PS: No Popeye arms huh? OK, who moves that enormous quiet pellet trap around? The crane operator?
    HA!

  • ajvenom Says:

    and on the 10th day he rose again…..too his feet of course.

    Go BB Go…

    -AJ

  • Slinging Lead Says:

    DaveUK

    I am glad to see you are a frequent contributor. Our gun rights are under constant attack in this country, yet I think Americans take our blessed rights for granted. One day, we will not have them. And this will make ME into a criminal, in the eyes of our government.

    Hitler enforced a disarmed German populace, all the while preaching their supposed genetic superiority. Strange.

    You provide a viewpoint that is enlightening to us spoiled yanks. It is basically a warning, and much like dunking my head in cold water.

    As for PM Brown. Don't get your hopes up. The capacity for outrage among the masses is boundless. Unfortunately, most of the masses are too short-sighted to understand the source of their outrage. They will merely elect the Devil they don't know to replace the Devil they know. The illusion of security that the nanny-state promises is much too difficult to pass up, when you lack the imagination to think you can take care of yourself.

    If you ever find yourself in Powder Springs, GA, USA look me up. I will buy you a pint or two!

    Cheers, mate.

  • Slinging Lead Says:

    AlanL

    Popeye ate his spinach straight from the can. Uncooked. I hope you understand the implications of this. Your cover is blown.
    No, I will not arm-wrestle you for money!

    Try not to rip the barrel right off your new HW30S.

    Only kidding Alan. Please don't drive up to Powder Springs and beat me up;^)

  • AlanL Says:

    Slinging Lead,

    Crudeness? Are you kidding? That dovetail puts Matt's knife blades to shame. You can literally peel potatoes and apples with it. Or shave lime skins for key lime pie. I'm hesitant to stone those edges, but if I bleed I will.

    My "helper" helped me hoist that trap up and from thence it shall never move again!

    My eyesight's too poor for an aperture sight. I've got to stick with wide open notches and a fair-sized post so I can lay on my fuzzy target.

    Powder Springs, hah? No, I think I'll join you for that pint or two instead!

    DaveUK,

    Don't knock the mother country too hard– those cool foggy forests and bonny British lasses are hard to beat!

    -AlanL

  • DB Says:

    This looks like a good place to drop my follow-up on the Daisy 953 that I was prepping for last Christmas.

    The bad news is the intended boy didn't get it. Mom & Dad decided he was not mature enough yet and asked me to hold off another year.

    The good news is while I'm holding on to it it is being shot quite a bit and just keeps shooting better and better. The darn thing is deadly accurate out to 20-yards.

    With the power upgrade 20-yards only has a 1/2 or so drop. And the trigger mod smoothed out and is now quite crisp and light.

    Darn thing is a bear to cock though. Meaning the bolt requires a lot of effort to pull back. I think it related to the trigger mod. Though the reason is not apparent to my.

    Anyway having kept the 953 for a while longer gave me a new appreciation for it. This really is a very nice shooter.

    Bet the 888 is a dream.

    I put a Leapers BugBuster on it but it spoiled the ballance. So is now sporting a Daisy peep sight. The peep is perfect for the 953 short range shooting. Did have to add a rubber eye cup to avoid sun glare.

    DB

  • DB Says:

    Very glad to hear BB (Tom) is doing so much better.

  • Slinging Lead Says:

    Matt61

    Have you read Flags Of Our Fathers by James Bradley? Clint Eastwood produced a movie based on the book, but I haven't seen it, mostly because I didn't want to be disappointed. It is an unbelievable insight into the horrible godless Japanese war machine of the time. I thought I knew something about WW II at the time I read it. It showed me how little I knew. The Japanese (almost) made Hitler's SS look like amateurs as far as what brutality could be indulged and encouraged. I find it very peculiar that only one of the axis powers is so pilloried.

    What I find most fascinating about the period is the very little mention of Benito Mussolini, whom Hitler once looked up to. He is known in Italia as Il Duce, or as I prefer to call him, Il Douche Bag. He was the 'coward of the county' so to speak, yet his official title was "His Excellency Benito Mussolini, head of the government, Duce of fascism, and 'FOUNDER OF THE EMPIRE'". HA! Take that Julius Caesar. Anyone who needs so many titles obviously has very tiny genitalia.

    I do take solace in the fact that he died a death befitting of such a craven piece of $H1+. I suppose fascists will want to flame me now…

    This from Wikipedia, which is frequently wrong, but I hope not in this case…

    "After being shot, kicked, and spat upon, the bodies (Mussolini, Petacci, et al.)were hung upside down on meathooks from the roof of a gas station, the bodies were then stoned by civilians from below"

    How befitting. I only regret that his rotten carcass was not ingested by stray dogs.

  • DaveUK Says:

    All you good folk on here thank you for being understanding.
    Us British and a Londoner like me particulaly have a very odd sense of humour compared to our American cousins and also we are a bit undiplomatic.
    I now live in Lincolnshire not far from Boston and Lincoln(the originals)and the locals here also find me a bit…different.
    I try to just read and learn on BBs site but being a cockney I can't help it, I have to open my big gob(Mouth)lol.
    I'm also quite new to the whole internet thing and it was BBs misfortune:)that I found his excellent site first while I was researching Brocock Air cartridges.
    When you've found the best forget the rest goes the saying.
    A pint or two in Powder Springs GA sounds mighty good to me Slinging Lead.
    All the best,
    Dave,
    Louth,Lincolnshire.

  • rikib Says:

    Don't really know how to apologize for posting that I felt things were becoming a little to sarcastic. All I can say is sorry, I'll try not to take things so literally in the future (especially when they don't involve me). I humbly apologize.
    rikib

  • rikib Says:

    Slinging Lead
    How's the weather? Your truck black again? Still under thunderstorm watch here, but my wrangler is red again. This rain has knocked a lot of pollen down at least.
    rikib

  • Vince Says:

    Slinging Lead, read (if you haven't already) 'Baa Baa Black Sheep' by Gregory Boyington. Very down-to-earth first-hand account of both fighting the Japanese and living under them as a POW. He relates the vast gap he saw between the best and the worst of the military, and between the military and the civilians.

    Near the end he relates how he and other prisoners submitted sworn depositions on behalf of some guards (frequently Christian) who, at great personal risk, went
    out of their way to help them. But these documents didn't do any good during war crimes trials, since the attorneys ignored them. Why? They were too busy at that Geisha houses, and hey – 'they were all Japs, and got what they had coming to them'

  • Mr B. Says:

    Volvo,

    When you were talking with Wayne earlier today that his business must be booming this time of the year, didn't you really mean to say, that it must be blooming this time of year?

    Mr B.

    Mr B.

  • Volvo Says:

    Bg farmer,
    I sent you an e-mail earlier today, not sure if you received it yet. Let me know when you can.

  • Volvo Says:

    Mr. B,
    You are officially the master.

    Matt61,
    I enjoyed your take on the forum and the series.

    AlanL,

    HW80 or HW85 is a
    tough call. I would go HW80 however. Carbine in .22 if you can find it. "K"

  • BG_Farmer Says:

    Volvo,
    Got it and responded just now, sorry I didn't see it earlier. Just reply to the e-mail, and I'll know you got it, too:).

  • DaveUK Says:

    rikib:
    I am the one who is sorry mate and apologise to you and everyone else for being over familiar and jumping in with both feet on here.
    I do hope BB and Edith believe I am sincere about my concern and best wishes at this tough moment in time for them.
    BB has always been good to me and always answers my questions,however odd those questions may be.
    And I can say the same for all of you on this site as well,who are always willing to help someone else with good advice.

    'Tornado Watch' as well as 50cal air rifles and Dennys Diners.
    I was born on the wrong side of the Atlantic I reckon.
    rikib I am jealous ;)
    Cheers,
    Dave.

  • Desertdweller Says:

    Vince,

    I have not read "Baa, Baa, Black Sheep". But the best account of that type I have read is titled "Flyboys". The book is back at my Nebraska house, I can't recall the author.

    It is the true story of American POW's held by the Japanese on Chichi-Jima. Some of the Japanese developed close friendships with the Americans. Others literally ate the Americans. Pretty tough to read.

    Les

  • rikib Says:

    DaveUK
    I loved the 6 1/2yrs I spent in Wales. I miss the Wimpy's (no Denny's around here). As I mentioned earlier my wife is from Oxford, but we met over here in Georgia after I had retired. It's sorta strange but while I was stationed in Wales I used to drive thru Oxford to get to Upper Heyford almost every fortnight then we meet here. There's a lot more to the story, maybe I'll write a short story someday.
    rikib

  • rikib Says:

    DaveUK
    Also I really miss the Pubs, so much different than a bar here in the USA. Oh, and the fish and chips. My wife still places orders to Sainsbury's over the internet. Mainly for crisp, mushy peas, spotted dick (no joke Dave knows what I'm talking about). But is mainly Walkers crisp she orders them by the case.
    rikib

  • Edith Gaylord Says:

    I read the comments and haven't seen anything that's sarcastic or that requires an apology. Sometimes, it's not so easy to communicate in writing.

    Edith

  • rikib Says:

    Edith
    I guess I can agree with that, sometimes my fingers overrun my brain/mouth.

    I've been looking through the net about recycling co2 cartridges, best I can come up with is to dispose of them as you would a soup or soda can. Does this sound right to all you co2 users out there?
    rikib

  • DaveUK Says:

    rikib:
    Even though I moved only about 150 miles from London I do miss the odd thing from there.
    Your wifes move to the USA was an even bigger step.
    I am sure though, that as I have no wish to live back in London your Wife would have no wish to move back to the UK.
    Ok for a visit,but to live…no.

    Funny you being ex USN and marrying an English lass rikib.
    I have a tale about a family friend.Rest his soul.
    An ex USN WWII veteran,who asked my Dad,who was an ex London cop, to find the English girl he was engaged to marry back during the war.
    Through circumstance beyond their control they never did marry and neither knew the real reason why till they met again many years later.
    Suffice it to say that against all odds my dad tracked the girl down and our friend was able to tie up a loose end in his, and her life.
    The second world war has a lot to answer for, not just the big events but the small personal ones as well.
    It is 4.20 am in the UK.best off to bed I think.
    Take care mate.
    Dave.
    Ps.
    Edith: the written word is often harder to interpret than the verbal one and I also find a beer in one hand and a cigar in the other also aids conversation :)

  • rikib Says:

    DaveUK
    I knew it was early a.m. there surprised you were still up.
    Actually the wife and I have talked a few times about moving to the UK, but mainly to Wales (her ancestry). But cost of living is so high. I loved Pembroke, Haverfordwest, St. David's (where I lived). Last time I left there summer '95 even flats where so expensive. Could really use a pint of bitter right now. Ta matey!
    rikib

  • Slinging Lead Says:

    rikib

    I got home from work today around noon. It had just begun to rain, and my truck was nearly Black. Then the clouds opened up and we had a real gully washer. When I left for work this evening around 10:30 my truck was yellow once again. These danged pines are unbelievable.

    I had the spotted dick once. Penicillin cleared it right up. HA!
    Sorry couldn't resist.

  • rikib Says:

    It rained till almost dark down here so I'll have to wait till tomorrow to see what color my jeep is. They were even showing on the news the other day how car detailers are raking in the money. I guess people would rather hand over cash than take out their hose.
    Yeah, that spotted dick was an open invitation.

  • Slinging Lead Says:

    Vince

    Thanks for the suggestion, I will be reading that one.

    Hope I didn't come off as anti-Japanese. It is a beautiful country and they are an amazing populace. Much like the Germans, when such hard-working industrious citizenry are harnessed by evil leadership, all hell breaks loose, literally.

    The weather has allowed me to finally shoot my TX200 a bit. My troubles are mostly sorted out, but I am convinced it is not as smooth as it once was, and I must try a little harder to get the accuracy. (different sides of the same coin I suppose) As soon as I can find a suitable box, I will be sending it to you, if you are still willing to have a look at it.
    Thanks again.

  • rikib Says:

    Slinging Lead
    Now that I think about it, we've had the rain so not only will I have the pollen to contend with but the lovely Georgia red clay mud roads down here. It can be fun but makes one hellva mess.

  • rikib Says:

    Sure wish the show "Leverage" was on earlier than 2am. Get caught up in that then "Cold Case", then 2 episodes of "Numb3rs" next thing I know I've been up all night.
    rikib

  • FRED Says:

    Dessertdweller,

    "Flyboys" was written by Bradley, same author who wrote "Flags of our Fathers".

    It detales the cannibalism the Japanese officers and many of the NCO's and even some of the enlisted men engaged in as there was no food on Chichi Jima.

    Fred PRoNJ

  • Anonymous Says:

    ANY HELP ON TRIGGER FIX/ADJUSTMENT FOR WALTHER TALON MAGNUM?

  • FRED Says:

    Anonymous,

    I'm going to re-post your request for help on the current blog. This one was written last week and only a handful of volunteers, I being one of them, monitor the older blogs.

    The current blog can always be found at:

    http://www.pyramydair.com/blog

    The blog is written 5 days a week and o.ff-topic comments or questions are welcome.

    Fred PRoNJ

  • Bobby Nations Says:

    Talon trigger pull,

    Unfortunately, there doesn't appear to be any remedy for the trigger pull except for letting it break in. B.B. reviewed both the Talon and it's .25 caliber brother, the Falcon, and covered the trigger in both instances. In fact, here's what he had to say in the Falcon review:

    The trigger-pull is 4 lbs., 12 ozs. It feels like it's breaking-in very quickly; at first it seemed much heavier than it is now. It's not a standard design and probably can't be easily changed, in the same way that many Gamo triggers can.

    Over the break-in period, the trigger did improve but here's the final result:

    Trigger
    The trigger is holding steady with a crisp but deliberate pull. I doubt there will be any advance in that area.

    Sorry,

    Bobby

  • darvy hearts paulie perrette Says:

    Hey howdy
    I just got this Air rifle Don't know who made it Except it was made in Shanghai
    the serial number is…1922100
    there is a diamond shape on the receiver with an I or an H in the center of it
    it's an under lever with wood stock all metal parts the screw is missing to hold the stock to the rest of it
    it still has the Caution sticker on the butt stock
    there is no safety on it
    has sort of a loop ring mounted on the side for a strap sort of rusty due to the former owner had it in north Florida in a leaky trailer
    I am not sure what kind of seals are in this so i put about 5 drops of RWS Silicone chamber oil in it
    let it set over night
    the sights are all metal the rear sight is painted green think it came like that
    i also have a youth break barrel looks like it was made by the same company but its so rusted i cant see any id marks nor can i cock it
    If any one can help me with this new Adventure I would be for ever grateful
    Jerry D. Kittle

  • Bobby Nations Says:

    Jerry,

    The underlever sounds like a B3, but it's hard to be certain without a picture to go on. The Kermit Airgun club in Texas once ran a contest for B3 refinishers. Does yours happen to look like the gun at the top of their winning entries page?

    If so, then you have about a $20 gun that has been produced for many years in a number of factories in China though primarily by Industry Brand. Though not worth much in pure monetary sense, they have a certain appeal because they're so much fun to tune and adapt. The respond well to home tuning and are cheap enough that if you mess something up, then you aren't out a bunch of money. For that reason, many airgunners have used them as their first tuning experiment.

    They all seem to have leather seals, so oiling them is proper.

    Enjoy,

    Bobby

  • Vince Says:

    Jerry, Bobby was right. Industry Brand B3. It has no anti-beartrap, so keep a hand on the lever while loading. If the sear lets go while you're loading it (as they are sometimes known to do), the sliding cylinder will come slamming forward.

    There used to be a 'cleaning and spare parts kit' sold for the B3/B4 series that had an extra sear, a replacement spring, and a replacement seal (among other stuff). It's part# QF-2, and shouldn't be that hard to find.

    The main seal might be leather or synthetic.

  • darvy hearts paulie perrette Says:

    Tnaks Boby Thats Exactly what it is
    Its a shanhia B-3-2
    And the mods listed on the website you sent me my god the potential this thing has!
    So first things first
    How do i go about removing the RUST?
    inside the receaver the bit where you load the pellet is rusted there is spot rust all over it
    the clip holding the under lever is broken
    and last where can i find the screws to hold the "works" onto the stock? oh and one more thing if i have to replace the main seal will a synthetic seal work on it?
    Thanks guys you and Mr.& Mrs. Gaylord are God Sends!
    Jerry D. Kittle

  • Bobby Nations Says:

    Jerry,

    On rust. Just about any lightweight oil plus a rag will remove surface rust. If the rag doesn't do it, then try moving up to bronze wool and oil. I have had good luck with Ballistol in the past. B.B. wrote a post about removing rust with pictures. He also wrote a post about preserving a blued finish once you get the rust off of it.

    Stock screws can be had at any Home Depot, Lowes, Ace Hardware, or in my case the local h/w store on my town square. Look for the appropriate sized hex head screw. Since you won't be able to drag the gun along for test fitting, be prepared to buy a couple until you find the correct size. That shouldn't run you more than $3 or $4 depending upon how good you guess ;-)

    It is possible to replace the leather seal with the synthetic one in the QF-2 kit, but I've never done it. There are some posts somewhere on the gatewaytoairguns website detailing various ways to build the 'button' that holds the synthetic seal on the piston. The leather seals are more forgiving, so I just left mine in after soaking it in neatsfoot oil to condition it.

    I believe one of the folks on the Kermit Airgun Club used a rawhide thong to keep his lever in the up position. He also cut off the pistol grip to give a more western style stock and liked the 'authentic' frontier thong loop. You might try the same thing.

    The Kermit Airgun club has a number of documents regarding the B3 (also known as the B4-2) in their tips page and their projects page. They also have plans for a good spring compressor, which you'll need to do a tune.

    One of these days, I'm going to chop about four inches from the barrel on my B3-F and give it a real crown, but for now, it's accurate enough. And a very smooth shooter after I tuned it.

    Best of luck,

    Bobby

    BTW, if you do restore this gun, keep us all abreast of your results on the current blog postings. Heck, you might even be asked to write up what you do as a guest blog!

  • Vince Says:

    Bobby, the B4-2 is NOT the same gun as the B3. They are both cheap Chinese underlevers, but they are different mechanically. I believe the piston stroke is different, and I know the trigger parts aren't the same.

    The seals do interchange, and if I recall the original B3 spring is weaker than the B4-2, but the spring in the QF2 kit is identical to the B4-2 spring and works in the B3. Oh, and BTW – the 'B4' application listing for the QF2 kit does NOT refer to the B4-2. It refers to the B4-1 sidelever (descendant of the old TS45) that uses the same trigger parts as the B3.

    Oddly enough the very first springer I bought was a Cummins Tools 'B3', which turned out to be a B4-2 with a dovetail mounted rear sight instead of the AK47-style of the B4-2, and no safety in the triggerguard area. The front sights were identical.

  • Bobby Nations Says:

    Jerry,

    Vince is right about the triggers being different on the B3 and the B4-2 guns. They also have different rear sights. On the whole, though, they are remarkably similar in almost every other way.

    Frankly, you should probably stay away from any trigger-work on either rifle. And definitely keep a good grip on the underlever at all times. I've had the sear on mine let go when I was pushing the lever back up to the barrel. Fortunately, I was using the flat of my hand, so no knuckles were in the way, but it still smarted a bit. Another lesson in keeping the barrel pointed downrange at all times.

    Good shooting,

    Bobby

  • darvy hearts paulie perrette Says:

    Thanks for all the advice the rust removing tips are real great and taken to heart
    to get where it was made i took a little wd 40 and a paper towel i used an ultra fine emery board to take off some of the rust
    i don't think I'll blue the metal i have an air brush and plan to camo it
    I saw that on the web site bobby sent me (if you scroll up and follow the links?)when it was brought hom last night it didnt have the powere to pop a pellet out
    so i gave her 5 to 6 drops of good old RWS chamber oil
    let it set up over night and tried a B.B tight fit and popped out ok then gave her a few more drops then let her sit till about 8 or 9 this evening
    then put a pellet in it
    the crosman destroyer and it fired on but the plastic bucket didn't have any hole where the destroyer hit
    we have a digital camera so i probably would like to post photos of the step by step
    the clip for the under lever i probably can make or find
    but what about the trigger guard?
    oh by the way if i decide to change the trigger? i would probably have some one with some salt on their feet( Navy Term) put the GTR3 in it IF that would work

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