RWS 92 – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Before I begin, don’t forget that on April 8 at 8 p.m., Eastern, I’ll have a special Q&A session on Pyramyd Air’s Facebook page just for you. Please join me then. You must have a free Facebook account and be a friend of Pyramyd Air to participate.

Part 1

Before we begin, I have an airgun-related story for you. Edith and I own a Select Comfort bed–the kind that is called a Sleep-by-Number bed today, but 15 years ago it was just Select Comfort. The air compressor that inflates both mattresses finally went belly-up this past weekend, so we ordered another. But while trying to fix this one, air was let out of both mattresses, and the bed was unusable until the new compressor arrives.

I used a CO2 bottle to inflate one mattress, but I ran out of CO2 before the job was finished. So, I used a scuba tank to finish the job. It did the job in less than a minute, and although I have to admit that it was not convenient to do, I was sure glad we were able to do it, because I love that bed. I would not have enjoyed sleeping on a lesser mattress for even a few nights. In the past I have also used a bulk tank of CO2 to extinguish a car fire, and now this. It’s just one more reason I’m glad to be an airgunner.

Today, we’ll take a look at the power of this RWS 92. Several readers were familiar with this airgun, so this should be a revealing day for them.


RWS model 92 by Cometa.

Getting right to it
Crosman Premier 7.9-grain pellets averaged 618 f.p.s. The spread was from a low of 596 f.p.s. to a high of 638 f.p.s. That’s 42 f.p.s., which is pretty high for a spring gun. That computes to an energy of 6.7 foot-pounds.

Next, I tried JSB Exact 8.4-grain pellets. Being heavier, they should be slower; but being made from softer lead, they may be close in velocity. It came as only a small surprise that they averaged 635 f.p.s. The spread went from a low of 626 to a high of 647, so just 21 f.p.s. separation. The rifle’s more at ease with this pellet, though we’ll have to await the accuracy results to know for sure. The energy is a more lively 7.52 foot-pounds.

Then, I tested some RWS Hobbys. As a lightweight lead pellet, they should be pretty good in a gun like this. They averaged 693 f.ps. The spread went from 675 to 707, so 22 f.p.s. The energy worked out to 7.47 foot-pounds.

The power fits in with my observation that the 92 is 7/8 of an FWB 124. It’s a great place for a plinking rifle to be. A little less than advertised but still very useful.

Firing behavior
The rifle is fairly calm when it fires, but there’s a jolt. The barrel was too loose when I tested because it would not remain in any position after being cocked. I took the action out of the stock and found the locking screw for the pivot bolt that Vince told us about. I tightened the pivot bolt, but then it didn’t align with the locking screw with or even without the spacer he put in, so I removed the pivot bolt and reshimmed it to torque the bolt a little more. It doesn’t change the velocity, but it may help the accuracy when the time comes. I see what Vince means about those notches being hard to align when doing this job, so I was glad for his fix.


Here you can see the barrel pivot bolt locking screw clearly, and how it must fit into one of the scallops cut into the periphery of the pivot bolt head. If it’s off, the locking screw won’t fit. A small shim under the pivot bolt head causes it to end its rotation earlier than normal. You can also see that the next notch is very far from this one, so the shim must be much thicker.

I did slice my finger while working on the action outside of the stock, which is a reminder that the metal parts on many spring rifles have razor-sharp edges unless you take the time to dull them. Normally, that’s part of a tuneup. It’s not the sexy part nor does it add anything to the bottom line, but it’s the thing to do for your own peace of mind whenever you work on the action again.

The two-stage trigger-pull breaks at between 3 lb.., 2 ozs. and 3 lb.., 14 ozs. I attribute the large difference to the second-stage creep, as you would expect on a rifle in this price range.

When out of the stock, the 92 also resembles the FWB 124 more than a little. I would expect disassembly would be similar to the German gun. Looking through the cocking slot, I noticed that the mainspring was coated with moly paste, which confirms that this rifle was lubed after it came from the factory.


Moly grease on the mainspring is a giveaway that the rifle was tuned after the factory lubed it.

So far, so good. It looks like the RWS 92 is a fine plinking pellet rifle that was a great value when it last sold at $100. Next time, I’ll check the accuracy, which will be interesting with these all-plastic sight parts.

68 Responses to “RWS 92 – Part 2”

  • Anonymous Says:

    Hi B.B.
    Back in June of 2007 you did a report on the RWS 34 Panther. While you where cleaning the barrel you felt a restriction toward the muzzle, you thought it was choked. My question is are there other RWS choked models.

  • B.B. Pelletier Says:

    No RWS Diana spring gun has an intentionally choked barrel. Sometimes the addition of the front sight displaces metal which can feel like a choke, but it isn't there on purpose.

    Only PCP barrels and some target spring and CO2 gun barrels are choked intentionally.

    B.B.

  • twotalon Says:

    B.B.
    The pivot bolt lock screw on that rifle looks just like the same setup as there is on one of my rifles. The Turkish made Powerline I think. That gun is a P.O.S.
    twotalon

  • Eric Says:

    You'll have to let us other long-time users of Select Comfort beds in on your emergency fill procedure!! Now let me see, does that gizmo under the bed have a foster fitting? LOL

  • twotalon Says:

    B.B.
    I use my shop air compressor for blowing up air mattresses and beach balls . Works real good.
    Shove the end of the cleaning attatchment into the fill valve, and push the button.

    twotalon

  • B.B. Pelletier Says:

    twotalon,

    Yeah, I'm one of those guys who doesn't have a shop compressor, so I have to improvise..

    B.B.

  • twotalon Says:

    B.B.
    I could not live without a shop compressor…or my multimeter.

    My first compressor was a cheap one that ran continuously, had no air tank, and was only adjustable for output pressure.
    It was OK for a low tire, but that was about all.

    Now I have a twin cylinder, auto shut off, adjustable regulator, and a 20 gal tank.
    I use it for a lot of things.

    twotalon

  • CJr Says:

    To the guy looking for a Marauder scope,

    My personal observation is that it is extremely difficult to look through a scope and at the same time hold onto the gun and adjust the bell for parallax. All the scopes I have have a lot of resistance in the adjustment.

    A side parallax adjustment is a must for me, and even that is hard to fine tune adjust without a wheel added because if its resistance. I consider the resistance a good thing but annoying.

    I do not have a side wheel on my Marauder or any other gun yet because I shoot 100% 10m and don't have to adjust again after initial sighting in. Most of the time I just need to turn the knob all the way to the minimum and leave it there. I have a side wheel waiting to be installed when necessary.

    If you get a side wheel just remember it will probably not fit all your scopes that have side knobs. The scope I like to use the most has a side knob that is too large to fit – bummer.

    -Chuck

  • Anonymous Says:

    B.B.
    I have rws 34 panther and when cleaning the barrel I can feel a restriction at the muzzle end. It dose not seem to efect the accuratse.

  • B.B. Pelletier Says:

    RWS 34 Panther,

    Thank you.

    B.B.

  • Vince Says:

    Anonymous, if you push a pellet through from the breech do you feel a restricion? If you do – how far back from the muzzle exit does the restriction start?

  • Anonymous Says:

    Vince
    The restriction starts 58 in from the end of the muzzle.

  • Mr B. Says:

    CJr,

    Yes, I have the same problem with a scope of mine, perhaps the same kind as the one you use the most–helps prevent canting-thanks again. My solution was to cover the adjustment "turret" with a small, fat rubber band which works almost as good as the wheel on the Leapers Mini Swatt scope that's on my Talon SS.

    Mr B.

  • CJr Says:

    Mr B,
    Thanks for that tip on the scope turret.
    -Chuck

  • AlanL Says:

    B.B.,

    Filling an entire mattress with CO2 sounds dangerous. If it leaks during the night you may be left without enough oxygen in the room and quietly pass away in your sleep. Not that that's such a bad way to go…

    -AlanL

  • AlanL Says:

    I forgot to mention that the danger is made greater by the fact that CO2 is heavier than air and will therefore displace the air at the lower levels of your room where you sleep. If you poke your bed with something hard during the night… goodbye Tom & Edith.

    -AlanL

  • KidAgain Says:

    twotalon,

    Double piston, 20gal? Nice combo. fast recovery, small tank, quiet operation.

    My shop compressor is single piston, 15 gal horizontal tank. Used it as my shop AND portable for years, until manufacturers started making reasonable small units.

    Went through several small, high rpm, loud "buzzing" oiless units for portable use. Don't like 'em.

    Just bought a Husky portable dual tank unit last year from Home Depot for $250 that seems to be making the grade for the portable use. No more hernias lifting that 15 gal unit around.

  • KidAgain Says:

    BB,

    This rifle is comparable to the Bronco, no?

  • Slinging Lead Says:

    CO2 is heavier than O2. Unless Tom and Edith were on the floor, the air quality would remain unaffected.

    Even if on the floor, CO2 gas is not poisonous in the sense that Chlorine gas or H2S gas is. True, it will kill you in high concentrations, but we also breath it with every breath of air. Unless it was a very small room with no ventilation, Tom and Edith would be fine.

    Sleep easy Tom and Edith.

  • AlanL Says:

    Or sleep in high high bunk beds, both on top!
    -AlanL

  • Edith Gaylord Says:

    We survived the use of the CO2 in our Select Comfort bed. The mattresses will suffer no punctures because they're well hidden inside the framework of the rest of the bed. The cats sleep on the bed all the time, and nary a puncture has been made.

    Edith

  • KidAgain Says:

    BB,

    I spent a couple nights on one of those matteresses while visiting my folks a couple years back. Worst nights of sleep ever! they kept asking me how I slept and I didn't want to be rude so I said "not bad.

    They kept on for days about how wonderful these beds are and I couldn't hold back any longer. I told them that I was having the worst sleep of my life and that I was being engulfed in the mattress. That's when I learned that there's a control button to pump up the bladders!

    I had slept on a sleep by number bed for a week in their guest bedroom without hardly any air in it!

  • B.B. Pelletier Says:

    KigAgain,

    Not comparable except power. The Bronco is smoother in all ways.

    B.B.

  • B.B. Pelletier Says:

    KidAgain,

    I like 90 or higher. I know that from the motels I've stayed at where they have the numbers.

    Edith likes 35, so the two sides are way different.

    When we first got the mattress we inflated it and laid down to test it out. We woke up 45 minutes later.

    Adjusted right they will give you the best sleep of your life, though those memory foam mattresses look pretty good, too.

    B.B.

  • AlanL Says:

    My wife and I had one of those Swedish memory foam mattresses for a long time. They are comfortable, and your wife won't notice when you toss and turn (they really do absorb vibration very well), BUT, they are VERY HOT. If you live in an igloo I guess that's good, but in a normal environment, even if you run your A/C at 60 you'll parboil your backside on a memory foam mattress. No good airflow. I hated every minute I spent on it. And they weigh twice what a normal mattress does. Now I'm unhappy with my traditional spring mattress that replaced the foam one, so I might try that Sleep Number mattress if I can convince my wife to switch. And I'll have a compressor for those pool toys!

    -AlanL

  • Alan in MI Says:

    BB,

    Looks like we get to ask your advice about a different use for of air power in this blog today!

    We have the Select Comfort as well, and similarily set it very different from each other (I at 45, my wife all the way up at 100). It is about 12 years old, so I guess you just provided me with some useful data!

    When you hit 90, are you on the bed or off it? I ask because that affects the pressure reading quite a bit, and we set ours with nobody on the bed.

    I've always worried about the longevity of the bed with my wife's side being so full, but it sounds similar to yours. I guess the good news to me is that your pumps is what failed – I've been worried about the mattresses themselves.

    AlanL – take her to a hotel with one to try out. And you can't really use the pumps for anything else . . . .

    Alan in MI

  • Slinging Lead Says:

    BB

    Hmmm, >90 vs 35. Good thing they have the dual comfort zones on those things huh? Is there much difference in elevation;^)

    As for me, they would have to configure one that had a 80/20 split on it. I am 6'2", when I am not all swelled up from being angry. She is not quite 5'. Guess who takes up the 80%? She!

    I admire your ingenuity Tom.

    As someone who has to (try to) sleep during the day, I have an acute sense of how important sleep is. Without it, you will go quite crazy.

  • KidAgain Says:

    6'2",

    I can relate to having to sleep on 25% of the bed. I wonder if our wives are related.

    With the option of dual adjusting sides it will be interesting what comes up on the sleep #'s for us, as my wife just let me know a couple days ago that she wishes we had our old bed back. We recently changed the top mattress.

    Alan in MI,

    Thanks for the suggestion on the hotels. That's a good idea.

  • KidAgain Says:

    Oops! Correction:

    That's SlingingLead, and 20%! Laughing @ myself!

  • Slinging Lead Says:

    DSW

    Sometimes, I have to share my 20% with a cat. That might get me down to 15% at times.

    I used to live in Huntington Beach. You ever been thataway?

  • Edith Gaylord Says:

    Tom takes up 60%. I always sleep near the edge of my side of the bed. Even when Tom's out of town, I sleep that way. I've slipped off the side of the bed more than once.

    We share our bed with 1-3 cats, depending on who's interested in being there at any one time. Two of them take turns snuggling under the covers in my arms, so whatever space I have is shared with at least one cat.

    When we lived in Maryland, all of our cats (up to 7 at one time) slept with us. I had one under each arm, one above my head on the pillow, 2 between my legs and 2 tucked in the space between Tom & me. They used us for warmth, rather than the reverse! My world & welcome to it.

    Edith

  • JP Says:

    BB, anyone ever done in-depth tests to see what a bad or spiraling pellet does during flight? also, you know of any testing done on a pellet to guess it's flight dynamics before test firing?
    JP

  • ajvenom Says:

    As for my wife, add a kid, a nephew, two nieces and a dog and I just end up sleeping on the couch.

    Co2 Mattress, well at least it won't catch fire….a bonus for any smokers out there.

    I almost choked my camera, I tried to make a video shooting the 853. It wouldn't load the end of the file becasue I accidently turned off the camera before I hit the stop record button…dolt!

    I shot a 4mm ctc in the second group of 5 shots. I got excited when the 1st 7 shots were dead on. So 4 groups of 5 read: 1mm-4mm-2mm-1mm ctc or .039"-.157"-.078"-.039". It would be cool to see what a real 10M shooter could actually do if they took the time to sort out their pellets, have more patience and shoot correctly.

    There's been a lot disturbing news in our neighborhood. Perhaps it's time to think more about home security. Now we make sure all the lights are on outside and all adults carry their cell phones at all times, even at home. Anytime the dog barks, we pay close attention. A gun should be the last resort. But, if needed, I wouldn't hesitate to use one.

  • Anonymous Says:

    BB, are the 397/392/Sheridan SS/SBS combos with the scope and case just the rifle with the air venturi intermount for the Benji/Sheridan rifles and a scope (plus the case, of course)?

    HK

  • Randy-in-VA Says:

    AJV (cont'd from Friday) – The 766 is kaput. It sat in a box for decades. It came in the original box with all of the paperwork, including the little tube of Pellgunoil and the receipt. It was purchased in 1979. I bought it at Roanoke from a guy who bought it and several other airguns at an estate sale. It has been shot more than a little based the wear. Fixing it is about 20th on the money list.

    The 1088 is a lot of fun. The only negative is having to wait between shots. You really want to empty the magazine. The G1 is worth about what it would cost to ship it back and forth to a repairer. I'll hang on to it to try to fix it myself. If I end up with a box of parts, it will be a cheap lesson learned. As best as I can tell, I shortened its life with heavy pellets.

    BB – Tell us more about using the SCUBA tank to inflate the mattress. Did you regulate the pressure down? I've heard dire warnings about exploding bike and car tires trying to inflate them with HPA.

    I went through most of a tin of Crosman .177 Destroyer EX's last night with mixed results. In the 1088, many of them fell out while loading the the magazine, and some fell out while the magazine was in the gun causing it to jam. in the Maurauder and the 490, for a five-shot group, I typically got one hole plus a flier or two 3/4" away. Not good considering that I was only shooting at 17' in my garage. A pleasant surprise was that I shot five or six one-hole groups with no fliers with the 717, again with five shots. It might be the low velocity, or it could be some statistical anomaly. I'll be in the mountains for spring break next week, so I'll be able to try longer ranges.

  • KidAgain Says:

    Edith,

    Cats; wife has 4, I like 1, tollerate 2 and hate her favorite!

    Only one will sleep on bed when I'm home. He chases the others off and sleeps on the other side of wife.

    Three sleep with her when I'm not home. The one I hate sleeps on MY PILLOW. I walk in the room and he runs under the bed. And why the one I like tolerates the other two when I'm not home and chases them away when I am is a mystery. and probably one of the reasons I like him.

    AJ,

    when I do sleep on the couch, it's with the cat #4

    SL,

    HB, not much. Spent some time in Oceanside and San Clemente. Grew up in the riptides of Marina Del Rey (Grandparents place every chance I got)just north of the runway. I can still here the whine of the then new Boeing 747 engines!!

  • KidAgain Says:

    This comment has been removed by the author.

  • Orin Says:

    I finally got my XL-1100 tuned the way I want it, and I was experimenting with some of the pellets that had previously tested well, including CP's and JSB 15.8's. Thankfully, the gun didn't lose any velocity, and while it didn't pick up any, it shoots much smoother now (even with less than 100 rounds through it and a new piston seal).

    I messed around with deep seating, and velocities went down 40-50 FPS pretty much across the board. Then I used a pen to flare the skirts before loading some JSB's and was astounded to see the velocities jump 50 FPS (previously low 790's, now mid 840's)! Not only that, extreme spread dropped from 12 to around 5 for the next 10-shot group.

    I was like, "Sweet, now I can get those Premiers to do low-mid 900's like I wanted all along!" Well, not quite. Flaring the CP's skirts didn't do anything, probably because they're already so snug in the breach. It did absolutely murder accuracy though, whereas with the JSB's, accuracy remained the same or was maybe even slightly improved. I'm not heartbroken – JSB's grouped tighter to begin with.

    Now I need to go back and flare some JSB's in my TX and see if I can get them to outshoot the Baracuda's/Kodiaks…

    - Orin

  • Anonymous Says:

    AlanL, LASER = Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation.

  • KidAgain Says:

    Oops!

    "…chases them away when I am HOME is a mystery."

    Guess I should use the proof read button sometime, huh?

    (wait, is this all good before I post?)

  • KidAgain Says:

    Orin,

    I used to flair skirts in High School. I'm afraid to now! :)

  • ajvenom Says:

    Randy – the 717 is right at home at target shooting. Also, pellets can make a big difference with any airgun. It took me about a year to learn how to get any good results with a springer.

    I do have a small compressor. It's just a 2 hp direct drive with cast iron oiled compressor on a 4 gallon pancake style tank. Mainly used for nailing, filling tires and cleaning dust out of office equipment. 50 foot hoses are handy.

    Multimeter….I can't leave home with out it.

  • Orin Says:

    A 20 gal compressor was my first large power tool. You don't know how much you need one until you have one. But then you start to realize how many tools can run off compressed air, and buying them becomes another expensive hobby.

    I loaned my compressor and a finish nailer to a friend a few weeks ago, and I have felt naked ever since. For the first time in over 10 years, I had to pay $.50 at the gas station to air up a tire.

    - Orin

  • CJr Says:

    I don't know how big Edith's & BB's bedroom is but I think that even if the entire mattress were to leak out there wouldn't be more than an inch of CO2 floating on the floor. However, it would be like a spooky movie, no? Like walking across the
    English Moors.

    -Chuck

  • AlanL Says:

    Anon,

    Yeah, I dated myself. The acronym as I presented it dates from a variant of the 1970's used for pulsed lasers. But I can't remember the source. Your acronym is the 'correct' one.

    -AlanL

  • derrick38 Says:

    Did you guys see that Ford sold Volvo to the Chinese today? I hope he's gonna be OK…

  • AlanL Says:

    Chuck,

    Right, but every time Edith kicks Tom out of bed to make room for more cats and he ends up on the floor…

    Geez, I really started something here– you know, I really didn't think there was all that much danger of Tom poking a hole in the mattress when he turned over!

    -AlanL

  • AlanL Says:

    Good one Derrick! Poor Volvo will have to call himself Geely from now on… Really, geely!

    -AlanL

  • BG_Farmer Says:

    Derrick,
    The real Volvo could sell a Chinese Volvo, but I don't know if he would or not:).

  • ajvenom Says:

    On Volvo: That may not be a bad thing…perhaps all new Chinese built cars will come with high pressure compressors to fill airguns with etc…..or self filling Co2 bottle set up that will run off an optional CO2 seperator in the catalytic converter. Perhaps there will be a lead melting pot option built into the exhaust manifold with an automatic pellet caster. Of course, the engine oil will have to be made to run off of pellgun oil…so there will always be an ample supply of this miracle lube. Also, the auto bodies should be blued so all one would need is a can of Ballistol to protects it.

    So there you go, you can have any color car you want….so long as it's black and you are an avid airgunner.

    Volvo – Remeber to get your ideas patented and get a contract on paper. If you like any of those ideas I mentioned, I will except airguns as payment.

    good luck Volvo,

    we'll miss you!!!!!

    -AJ

  • AlanL Says:

    AJ,

    I think you mean you will "accept" airguns as payment. I will take those that you "except"!

    -AlanL

  • Orin Says:

    …or maybe "expect" :)

    - Orin

  • ajvenom Says:

    I guess hooked on phonics doesn't work for me….

    of course accept, but I like expect too….

  • Slinging Lead Says:

    As far as Volvo being sold to a Chinese company goes, it is irrelevant.

    Lamborghini was once owned by Chrysler. They used to be manufactured in Mexico. Do people scoff at Lamborghini now? Yes, people who can't afford Lamborghinis.

    Harley Davidson was once owned by a bowling pin maker (AMF). Anyone wanna front on Harley?

    Beeman is now owned by the Chinese.

    Our own government at this very moment, is passing bills, that are being paid for, with money borrowed from the Chinese.

    Since I have a TX200, I have been wanting a BAM B40 out of morbid curiosity. I noticed this CHINESE made rifle went for sale at 1:12AM this morning and sold in less than an hour.

    Apparently Chinese-made goods are getting pretty damn good in some areas. People had better wake up.

    Hey! Just my opinion. Don't worry, be happy.

  • ajvenom Says:

    My feeling on chinese airguns….most likely worth the money, but don't expect more than what you pay for. Probably good advise for anything you buy.

  • Mike Says:

    You never know what people will buy. About 12 years ago, I had the bright idea that if I bought a pack of 5 Chinese airguns, made 20 bucks on each one, then the one I kept would be free (to Me).

    Well, it did work. After they were gone, friends of friends started asking me if I could get more of them. I said "Sure". By the time it wound down I had sold 68 of them. You never know.

    Mike

  • Orin Says:

    S.L. / AJV,

    I happen to agree with both of you. Most Chinese products that I've bought have been lower quality than other similar offerings. But just think… "made in Japan" used to mean lower quality too, and now look at them. Where else would you look to buy top-end electronics?

    - Orin

  • Anonymous Says:

    BB,

    Off topic, can the leapers 3-9×32 bugbuster scope withstand the punishment of RWS48? What about the 3-12×44 AO mini? Thanks.

  • Herb Says:

    JP,

    Not sure exactly what kind of in-flight analysis you had in mind. I think the answer is – not really…

    The flight dynamics seem to be a very complex interaction between gun and pellet, not either alone.

    Something as simple as recrowning the barrel can have a dramatic effect because it makes the airflow around the pellet more symmetric as the pellet leaves the muzzle.

    BB and a number of other trustworthy members on this blog have reported seeing a pellet spiral. I've never seen it, but I absolutely believe them. I'm fairly convinced that all pellets spiral, it is just whether or not the spiral is a significant source of error in aiming.

    There was some footage of ultra-high speed cameras, but much more for bullets than pellets.

    So far as I know there hasn't been any purely mathematical aerodynamic analysis of pellets, but if it can be done for bullets and rockets, it should be possible for pellets. Just not much money in pellet analysis.

    If you ask some specific questions about flight, I'm sure there are some folks on this forum who can answer them.

    Herb

  • /Dave Says:

    At the risk of getting run off, I think if you "cat people" would get a dog or 2, your cat troubles would be over….. ;-)

    /Dave

    WV: domorro…. I'll do more domorro.

    Try again. "fredins" That's what fredins are for.

    And again….. "lition" Those coal thingys.

  • rikib Says:

    Well haven't posted in awhile now. Got my first snake kill of the year today. No big deal, didn't get to use a gun. Couple of my cats had it cornered in the hallway so I just got a hammer and popped it in the head. Brought it to an old man down the road, said it was an Oak snake. Don't know how it got in, but he said they don't come alone.

    Read a lot of post about sleeping situations. They are really good. I've been married to my current wife for just over 7 years. We have a great relationship, but haven't slept in a bed together in almost 6 years. 4 dogs and 11 cats that all want to sleep together and with us. So in our family room we have 2 sofas and a loveseat. I allow 1 or 2 cats with me, don't know how the wife can sleep with a great dane, pitbull and 1 or 2 cats all on the same sofa with her and still sleep. But don't get me wrong I'm not complaining, and we have home alert system. Other 2 dogs, dingo and husky are always on floor or loveseat. It's a strange life but we enjoy it (most of the time).

    Well guess that's about it. Hadn't posted in awhile so my fingers were a little itchy.

  • Volvo Says:

    If a time traveler would have shown me a list in 2004 of all the upcoming events I never would have believed them. The Dow at 6300, the financial institutions that crumbled, the businesses that would disappear, my 401K, that I would try airguns that were less than $200, and on and on. I guess the only constant is change, as they say.

    But looking at the whole crazy list, I think the least raised eyebrow would have been the sale of Volvo.

    Looks like I need to start packing. I guess being sold to the Chinese is not all bad; I do enjoy the number 54 dinner at Lucky Star. Plus I will feel much taller over there.

    I wonder how the new Volvoru will handle?

  • rikib Says:

    Times they are a changing but please don't let everything change, let the Jeep Wrangler remain in the USA.

  • AlanL Says:

    JP,

    B.B. did some interesting studies on pellet energy by firing them into bars of clear Neutrogena soap. He is also a superb photographer, so together you have an excellent read. Search this blog. I don't know what this has to do with spirals, but whatever Herb says goes. Unfortunately he doesn't say enough on this blog.

    Another great source for pellet flight info with some amazing photography is to be found in Martin Cardew's book, "From Trigger to Target" for which you can find ordering info here. He will take a check in US$.

    I hope you come back and tell us what interesting things are going through your mind with these pellet flight questions- said topic is always fascinating.

    -AlanL

  • KidAgain Says:

    Volvo,

    laughing at the #54 joke!

    Don't be too sure about the height difference. Many Chinese are tall. Not sure which region, or 'sect' (for lack of better term).

    /Dave,

    "Cat people", ouch! now I am depressed. I will say though, that the only cat I like is more dog like that cat. His mannerisms are the amazement of my neighbors. Guy next door calls him Spot.

  • Anonymous Says:

    Hello, I have what I believe is to be a RWS 92 Y Rifle, or Daina 92 Y. This rifle was given to me by a person I knew and have had it for about 7 years. Until now I find great interest to know about this product! I do use it, but rarely, and now that I have more knowledge on airguns I plan on using it more frequent. I am interested in adding a scope, but not sure what, or how much it would take to properly add a scoop to this kind of rifle? I have watched some of the videos on Airgun Academy on scopes, but still not sure where I should start? All I believe to know is that this gun has a Y in its name for Youth, that it's possible max velocity is 720 fps, and that it could give about a max energy of 9ft/lb? I am interested to know more about this product, and where I should start on adding a scope?

    Thank you, and I hope to receive some feedback or information.

    Alex Prado

  • B.B. Pelletier Says:

    Alex,

    What kind of scope would you like to mount on your 92!

    Diana is an airgun maker. RWS is an airgun exporter. They don't make airguns. So that's the relationship between the two.

    B.B.

  • Vince Says:

    As far as I know the only RWS model 92 wasn't made by Diana – it was made by Cometa of Spain (along with the models 93 and 94).

    Are you sure it says Diana

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