Scope dope — I hope! Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This series was started for blog reader David Enoch; but after reading the comments many of you have written, I have to think it’s for most of you. Today, we’ll look at optically centering a scope — what’s involved and why you’d want to do it.

What is optical centering?
Optical centering means adjusting the scope until the center of the crosshairs is actually in the center of the field of view. This is difficult to understand; because when you look though a scope, the crosshairs always look like they’re centered. That’s because they’re permanently fixed in the center of a tube called the erector tube. It’s this tube that gets moved when the scope knobs are adjusted.

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Why powerful mainsprings don’t always increase velocity

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is the one I mentioned forgetting in last Friday’s blog! Blog reader Errol reminded me about it yesterday.

I hear this so often from airgunners — how they think they’re going to add a more powerful mainspring to their airguns and increase the power. It sounds logical, but it often doesn’t work; and it nearly always doesn’t work as well as you think it should. Today, I want to discuss why that is.

Fact 1
The Weihrauch HW 35 was always considered to be one of the most powerful airguns in its day — which was the 1950s. They delivered over 700 f.p.s. when new in the 1950s; and over time, this rose to 750 f.p.s. Careful tuning could get close to 800 f.p.s. from certain guns. This model is still being made today, but now it sells because it’s so pleasant to shoot and doesn’t produce excessive power. How times change!

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Crosman M1 Carbine BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Crosman M1 Carbine and U.S. Carbine
M1 Carbine on top and Crosman M1 Carbine below. A realistic copy!

When I attended San Jose State College in the 1960s, I was in ROTC. My first 3 years as a cadet were in the enlisted ranks, and we all drilled with the M1 Garand. Today, people feel the Garand is a cool historical military weapon (and it is!); but in the late 1960s when it was all we had, it wasn’t nearly so cool. It was, in fact, heavy, clumsy and dangerous when you performed Inspection Arms. We learned to live with it and eventually became adept at not smashing our thumbs when we closed the bolt, but the fact was that the Garand was a 10.5-lb. clunk that always seemed to weigh too much.

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Range tools

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is a placeholder for one I promised earlier this week and forgot what it was. If you were looking for a particular report today and didn’t get it, please tell me what it is and I will reschedule it.

I was at the range yesterday, shooting off my rifle rest, when I discovered the rest was wobbling. That’s not good because one of the most important things a rest should be is stable. Normally, I would have been unable to fix the problem, which was loose bolts on the rest; but every tool I needed to make the repairs was in my range bag. So, I thought we could take a look at what I carry with me to the range. What you are about to read comes from years of shooting and thousands of hours on the range, where you sometimes need a tool.

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Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Evanix Rainstorm 3D Bullpup
Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup

Well, the opinions of this rifle are sharply divided. People either love it or hate it, and nothing in between. A few haven’t made up their minds yet; but when they do, it’ll be one extreme or the other. The Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup is as far from a Diana model 27 as an air rifle can get.

Blog reader Rob is the only owner who has commented, thus far, and he says he loves his .25-caliber bullpup. He reports getting 25 good shots per fill and wants one in .177 for the greater shot count and 9mm for the additional power.

Some things I missed last time
I forgot to mention that there’s also a Picatinny rail under the forward part of the gun. This would be for a laser, flashlight or bipod.

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How does rifling twist rate affect velocity and/or accuracy? Part 13

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10
Part 11
Part 12

This is the summary report in this series. I’ll give you my thoughts on how this test went, and I expect you to comment, as well.

The barrels
Three barrels were used in this test. One was the factory barrel that comes with the .22-caliber AirForce Talon SS. It’s a 12-inch Lothar Walther barrel that has a choke of about a half-thousandth inch reduction in the bore diameter for the final 2 inches of length. That makes all the pellets of uniform size as they leave the muzzle, and it may potentially stop any in-bore wobble. This barrel has the standard airgun twist rate of 1-turn-in-16-inches of bore travel, written as 1:16″.

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UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 AO rifle scope: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 right
The 3-9x Bug Buster packs a lot of performance into a small package.

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 left
Bug Buster left side.

Today, we’ll start looking at Leapers’ new 3-9X32 UTG Bug Buster rifle scope. As you know from yesterday’s blog, I’ve mounted this scope on the Evanix Rainstorm 3D Bullpup for testing. I feel the small scope compliments the compact size of the bullpup.

UTG Bug Buster 3-9X32 on Rainstorm
The Bug Buster looks good on the Rainstorm 3D bullpup.

Boy, has Leapers come a long way with the Bug Buster since it first came out! First of all, let’s get the introductions out of the way. Leapers is the manufacturer. UTG, short for Under The Gun, is one of their product lines. Bug Buster is a name that airgunners gave to this scope when it first came out. Because it held (and still holds) the world record for close parallax adjustment, which in practical terms is the same as focusing, the compact scope was touted for shooting insects as soon as it hit the market. Someone coined the name Bug Buster, and Leapers adopted it as their own.

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