.22-caliber Lightweight Disco Double: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Disco Double new stock
The Lightweight Disco Double in its new stock looks striking!

I’d planned to report on the velocity of the Lightweight Disco Double today and, as good fortune would have it, the new stock arrived yesterday! So, I installed it and took a photo for you to see. I think it looks fabulous!

This stock was made by Normand Morin who has a website at Discos R Us. The wood grain is a very striking brown tone that’s finished shiny. The inletting is perfect for my rifle, and it dropped in with a tight fit. I like it even better than the walnut stock the rifle was shipped with. If you want to dress up your Disco, take a look at what this man can do for you.

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Building the $100 precharged pneumatic air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

$100 PCP
The PCP built on a Crosman 2100B chassis.

Today, we’ll start looking at the accuracy of the $100 PCP. This is the test that has concerned me most since we began this experiment. I knew that a Crosman barrel could be very accurate because of the success of the Benjamin Discovery. But the $100 PCP is a job we threw together quickly just to test the concept. And when I say “we,” I mean Dennis Quackenbush, of course. It isn’t fully developed. Will it shoot well or fail miserably? Today, we’ll find out.

Loose barrel
Since this is a lash-up job, there’s nothing connecting the barrel to the reservoir. This is a real free-floated barrel, but that’s not a good thing in this case.

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See All Open Sight: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

See All Open Sight
The See All Open Sight is revolutionary!

I mentioned this sight in my last SHOT Show update last week and started a firestorm of discussion! Apparently, many of our blog readers see the same potential that I do! Let’s start a long, detailed look at the See All Open Sight.

What can it do?
I see several uses for a sight like this. First, there are a number of airguns that come without open sights, and I get asked repeatedly what can be done about it. Let me take one of the more common ones, which also happens to be one that is extremely difficult to deal with — the TX200 Mark III underlever spring-piston rifle. If you’ve read this blog for any time at all, you know that I’m a huge fan of the TX200. I’ve written dozens of reports about it — the most recent batch being a 12-part series that just finished. Or I thought it was finished. Now, there’s a good reason to test that rifle once more with this new sight!

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Legends C96 CO2 BB pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

C96 BB pistol
Umarex Legends C96 BB pistol.

Today, we’ll look at the accuracy of the Legends C96 CO2 BB pistol, and I can sum it up in a single word: Spectacular! Those who like accurate BB pistols will want to put this one on their list.

I shoot all BB guns at 5 meters, which is about 16 feet, 5 inches. While that sounds incredibly close, it is the distance at which the Daisy National BB Gun Championship is shot; and if it’s good enough for the champions, it’s good enough for me. Besides, testing all BB guns at the same distance gives consistent results that can be compared across many tests.

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AirForce Escape: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Tarzan! This weekend, a number of readers conducted a discussion of the fictional character Tarzan and the author who created him, Edgar Rice Burroughs. I thought you should all know an interesting connection of Tarzan to airguns. His grandson, J.R. Burroughs, was a big-time airgun importer in the 1990s. In fact, he imported many of the Korean brands that are still coming in today.

When I started writing about airguns in 1994, I got to know J.R. through my writing, and I eventually met him at one of the SHOT Shows. We continued to communicate about airguns and many other things well into the 21st century. I haven’t heard from him since I got sick back in 2010, so he may no longer be involved with airguns like he once was, but he was certainly a mover and shaker in the U.S. airgun scene during the time he was active.

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.22-caliber Lightweight Disco Double: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

You tell me that you enjoy the longer reports that pick apart certain guns and analyze them in great depth. You insist that I explain the technical terms and sometimes also the terms that are specific to shooting. We have a wide spectrum of reader experience in the shooting sports on this blog; so when I write about something, I have to keep that foremost in mind. I try not to jargonize or use insider language, although I’m sure that I do from time to time.

Today we begin what will undoubtedly become a huge report. I think you will enjoy it, but I am asking for your help in managing the questions and comments that will undoubtedly result. So, sit back and pour a fresh cup of coffee or tea, for I think this trip is going to be fun for all of us!

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Falke model 70: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Falke model 70
Falke model 70 is a quality breakbarrel spring-piston rifle from the 1950s.

Today is accuracy day for our Falke model 70 breakbarrel. I tested this one at the same time I tested the BSA Meteor Mark IV; and after that horrible test, I was praying that this rifle wouldn’t let me down. When I bought the rifle at last year’s Roanoke airgun show, the seller told me it shot pretty well. I was hoping to see that — especially after what happened with the Meteor! It did okay in the velocity test, so there was no reason to suspect it wouldn’t also be accurate.

The Falke did not disappoint, though it’s important to bear in mind that this is a vintage spring rifle made by a company that went out of business a half century ago and not some tackdriver made by a target gun manufacturer. When you shoot one of these air rifles, think in terms of a vintage Diana model 27 rather than a Walther model 55.

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