Crosman MK-177 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Crosman MK 177 multi pump pneumatic
Crosman MK-177 is a multi-pump version of FN’s SCAR.

Today, we’ll begin testing the accuracy of the Crosman MK-177 multi-pump pneumatic. Because this rifle shoots both pellets and BBs, I’ll test both, but not at the same time and not in the same way. Today’s test of lead pellets was done at 10 meters, using the iron sights provided with the rifle.

I decided to use 5 pumps per shot for the entire test. That was both easy to do and was also pretty quick. According to the velocity test we did last time, Crosman Premier lites were averaging just over 500 f.p.s. on 5 pumps.

It took five shots to sight in the rifle. The first shot was 3 inches high and 2-1/2 inches to the right. Crosman supplies a sight adjustment tool with the MK-177, and I had to use both ends of it. One end is a flat-bladed screw driver that moved the rear sight to the left. The directions are printed on the sight, so there’s no confusion.

The front sight had to be raised because the rifle was shooting too high, so I unscrewed the front sight post several turns. Shot 2 was about three-eighths of an inch too high and three-eighths of an inch too far to the right. The hole was in the black bull, but it wasn’t centered. So, I made small adjustments to both the front and rear sights and fired again. This shot cut the 9-ring, which was close enough for me. I fired the other 2 shots, and they landed near the third shot. Sight-in was finished.

Crosman Premier lites
This is a Crosman rifle, so the first pellet I chose to test was the Crosman Premier lite. The first pellet hit the 10-ring of the bull, so I stopped looking through the spotting scope and just shot the gun. After the 10th shot, I looked at the target and saw a disappointing horizontal group that measured 1.173 inches between centers. None of the shots had been called as pulls (meaning the sights were off target when the gun fired), so this group surprised me.

Crosman MK 177 multi pump pneumatic 10 meters Premier lites
Ten Crosman Premier lites made this 1.173-inch group at 10 meters with the Crosman MK-177 pneumatic. It is surprisingly wide for 10 meters.

Air Arms Falcons
Next to be tried were the Falcons from Air Arms. They’re domed pellets made by JSB and weigh 7.33 grains. Once, again, the first shot cut the 10-ring, and I never looked after that. This time, the group was much better, measuring 0.839 inches between centers. It’s also much rounder than the Premier lite group, leading me to think the rifle likes this pellet better.

Crosman MK 177 multi pump pneumatic 10 meters Falcons
Ten Air Arms Falcons made this 0.839-inch group at 10 meters. This group is rounder than the first, which is a good sign.

The rifle’s behavior
At this point, I’ll comment on how the rifle performs. Shooting for accuracy I found the left-mounted cocking handle to be less of a problem than it had been when I tested the velocity. My procedure was to cock the bolt, advance the magazine, close the bolt, then pump the gun. This became a routine after a few shots, and it went surprisingly fast.

I rested the rifle on a sandbag for the shooting. Though it’s very light, the rifle was dead calm on the bag. The sights did not move one bit. And the MK-177′s trigger is so light and smooth that I found it very easy to shoot this way.

Pump effort identical to the 760
A reader asked me last time how this rifle compares to the 760 Pumpmaster in pumping effort. Silly me! I should have realized that the MK-177 is a 760 in another skin, but I tested my 40th Anniversary 760 just to make sure. The pumping effort is identical; or if there’s a small difference, the 760 is slightly harder because the MK-177 pump arm is a little longer.

RWS Hobbys
The next pellet I tried was the RWS Hobby. These fit the clip a little tighter, and I could feel some resistance when the bolt pushed them into the breech. Again, I checked the target after the first shot then never again until I was through. I noted that this pellet moved over to the left side of the bull with no change to the sights. There’s a lesson to remember!

Hobbys grouped very close to Falcons, with the difference being due to measuring error more than any real practical difference. Ten Hobbys went into 0.858 inche…again, the group is fairly round.

Crosman MK 177 multi pump pneumatic 10 meters Hobby
Ten RWS Hobbys made this 0.858-inch group at 10 meters. This is so close to the Falcon group that it’s too close to call. Hobbys are wadcutters which cut cleaner holes, and may have lead to their group measuring slightly larger.

H&N Match Pistol
At this point, I was ready to declare the MK-177 to be an accurate multi-pump, but I had one more pellet on the table to test. And that one was the H&N Match Pistol pellet — another wadcutter. I’ve had remarkable results with H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets in some target rifles, but the straight Match Pistol pellet has never done better than average. Until this test!

Ten pellets went into a group that measures 1.239 inches between centers. No record there! But look at the tiny group that 9 of those 10 pellets made! It measures just 0.399 inches and is very round! Ladies and gentlemen, I think we have a winner!

Crosman MK 177 multi pump pneumatic H&N Match Pistol
Ten H&N Match Pistol pellets went into a 1.239-inch group, but 9 of them went into 0.399 inches! I think this pellet might be the best one for this rifle.

From the results seen here, I think the MK-177 is a very accurate air rifle. It’s worthy of a 25-yard test with an optical sight. I’m thinking the red dot sight I’m using on the TX200 Mark III would be good for that. Before I do that, though, I’ll test the rifle with BBs at 25 feet.

So far, the MK-177 is a real winner! I enjoy the ease of use and the accuracy. If I didn’t already own a 760 and an M4-177, I would, perhaps, buy this one.

28 thoughts on “Crosman MK-177 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 3

  1. Don’t pay too much attention to me here because I am splitting hairs, but since this rifle has a rifled barrel, it is more likely based on the 664. Of course that is based on the 760, so I guess either guess would likely be correct.



    • RidgeRunner,

      The Crosman 760 is around 50 years old (I seem to recall seeing something about how it came out in 1964 somewhere but for the life of me I can’t remember exactly where) and has gone through something like 9-10 different iterations/design revisions. While the last couple iterations have had a smooth-bore (and crappy fiber-optic sights) the older iterations apparently had rifled barrels (and better iron sights).

      Also for what its worth… I like the Crosman 664 as much as anyone (especially since I have such fond memories of my old 664 from the 1990s), but the current version is kinda disappointing. They redesigned the Crosman 664′s receiver to use the same 5-shot magazine and crappy fiber-optic sights as the last couple iterations of the Crosman 760. Heck I’m surprised Crosman’s gone back to giving the 664 a rifled barrel. (I remember checking PA on the Crosman 664 a couple years ago and seeing it listed as a smooth-bore.)





        • There is a new CO2 version of the M-4 rifle sold as a Daisy Winchester MP4. It uses two 12gm CO2 cylinders and has a 16 pellet or BB magazine. I hope that BB will review it in the future. It is offered for sale by PA.



          • Thanks…I like the Bull Pup design and the light weight of the featured air rifle. For another idea, how about the Winchester M14 at $80 ! This is a huge reduction in price. Just be careful where we shoot these air guns, they may bring attenton to people thinking you are packing the real thing ! I would love to shoot indoors, but these air gun deserve a drive to an approved area.
            Pete


            • Ooops ! Not a BullPup design…did not pause to look at it..a faux BullPup design…another goof !
              Oh, and thank you Tom for the 3 part Blog on the AirSoft UTG Sniper Rifle. Very interesting, indeed.
              Wonder how those 6mm BBs feel under bare feet on a hardword floor…Yep, I found out at Wal-Mart that they are OK to use outdoors in Santa Barbara County, California, on private property. Even with the Blaze colored muzzle would never let it been seen anywhere but on the proerty
              Thanks, Again !
              Pete Hallock
              Orcutt, California


              • …More…Indoors, I think the Daisy 499 Avanti package is the answer. First, I do not like scopes. Second, very Accurate. Third, I love Aperture sights, fourth, Target capture systems means no BB’s underfoot and last, very inexpensive.
                There, now I’ll shut up.
                Pete


  2. Those groups are interesting.

    Almost seems like the gun is shooting two separate groups per target. I’m reminded of the extensive testing B.B. did with the airforce edge rifle. I’d clean the barrel on that MK-177.

    kevin


  3. My old 760 has a rifled barrel and wood stock and pump handle. (but the newer one is smooth bore and plastic stock and pump handle)
    It has a red dot on it. I also used some of Crosman’s barrel clamp style scope mounts and put a laser hanging under the barrel. (the newer one has a scope and laser on it)

    Both of the guns I used to teach my daughters to shoot with.

    And my 760 always has seemed to like the wadcutter pellets better for some reason than the other type of pellets. So I guess if the Mk-77 is based on the rifled barrel version maybe that’s what pellet it likes also?

    What do they do different to a barrel when it is a dual purpose barrel that shoots both bb or pellets? And maybe that affects the type of pellet that needs to be used in the gun?


    • “What do they do different to a barrel when it is a dual purpose barrel that shoots both bb or pellets”

      Should say (rifled) dual purpose barrel.


    • GF1,

      The lands of the barrel are shaped differently in barrels designed for BBs, so they don’t damage as easily from the steel passing through.

      My 40th Anniversary 760 also has a wood stock and pump handle. I told readers to buy one when they were available, because I knew the day would come when they weren’t. That day is here and they are now growing in value.

      B.B.


      • Do you think that kind of rifling design would like the flat nosed style pellet better? Maybe the head diameter of a waddcutter is a smaller diameter. And it would free the pellet up in the barrel a little more than if you had a domed type pellet.

        And I could never sell my old 760. But I have wondered how much it is worth. I got it in I think about 1970.


  4. I would think this rifle would not shoot BB’s as good as the 760 due to the 760 having a smooth bore barrel and the MK-177 is rifled. That same, if they were the same power plant and same length barrel, I would think pellets would shoot faster in the 760 due to less friction.


    • My old 760 barrel is rifled and it has the magazine above the bolt that holds bb’s that you transfer from the bb reservoir. My 760 shoots bb’s about as good as dome pellets. But not as good as the wadcutters.


      • GunFun1, I don’t have my old 760. It was the first “pump up” gun I owned as a kid. If I recall, mine had a rifled barrel, or so I think it did. It also had a “brass” bolt and metal receiver, not plastic. It was a very good gun back then. If I remember correctly, wasn’t Crosman owned by Coleman back then? Either way, my Dad bought a new one for critter control. He couldn’t shoot it near as well as my old one. So I went over with some pellets to sight it in. It didn’t shoot like my old one. When did they drop the rifled barrel? Thanks, Bradly



          • And both of my guns are good enough to hit starlings, sparrows and field mice if I keep inside of 20 yards. Works out real nice if you pest control in a barn with flat top wadcutters.
            So I could see the MK-177 to be equal to the 760 you would think.


        • Bradly,

          I could be wrong since this info came from comments in another airgun blog I sometimes read, but I think they dropped the rifled barrel in the standard version of the Crosman 760 about 2-3 iterations ago (maybe 15 years ago). I know the standard version I bought back around 2003/2004 at a major big box retailer’s Black Friday sale (which was the first and last time I’ve gone shopping on Black Friday at a major big box retailer) had a smooth-bore. However I also vaguely recall seeing on PA that some of the pink versions of the 760 were listed as having a rifled barrel around 2008/2009 so I guess when Crosman dropped the rifled barrel depends on which version of the 760 you’re talking about.


  5. That is some fair shooting from this gun. I won’t deny it. I still think they could have made this a much better gun than what it is though. I’m waiting for shot show now to see if gun makers will razzle and dazzle us this year. I admit 2013 was rather disappointing to me.


  6. “The pumping effort is identical; or if there’s a small difference, the 760 is slightly harder because the MK-177 pump arm is a little longer.”

    I guess that means I wouldn’t like pumping this gun then. I find pumping the Crosman 760 (and my Crosman 2100 for that matter) to be jarring and much less pleasant than my Daisy 880. The pump mechanisms usually are better built than on Daisy’s multi-pumps, which is good, but Daisy’s multi-pumps seem easier to pump and to have a smoother pump cycle.


  7. B.B.
    Please ask Crosman to make some 5 shot pellet clips for the MK-177 that feed from the LEFT side.
    This will allow the shooter to operate both the bolt and the clip with their left hand instead of having to switch hands when loading. The shooter can then pump the rifle, pull the bolt back, move the clip and push the bolt forward all with the left hand.
    The only change to the clip would be putting the finger grip on the LEFT side of the clip.
    Crosman could even put finger grips on both sides of the clip which would allow the shooter to choose wich hand to operate the clip with.


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