Two firearms made by airgun manufacturers: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Got a lot to cover today, so let’s get to it.

First up is the Daisy Manufacturing Company, now called Daisy Outdoor Products. Daisy is best-known for the BB guns they make, but did you know they also made firearms? That’s correct. In fact, Daisy made 3 different lines of .22 rimfire rifles — though one of them is only a rimfire by common categorization. That would be the Daisy V/L. V/L stands for Van Langenhoven, the last name of the man who invented the caseless cartridge technology Daisy used to make this gun. I’ve covered this before when I wrote about the new Daisy book published in 2012.

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The way this blog works

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Today I want to talk about this blog — what it is and how it operates. Two days ago, several readers got into a flaming war over politics. Each party wanted to have the last word, so the comments kept flying back and forth, getting pettier and pettier as they went. When I booted my computer Wednesday morning, I had 177 emails to read and deal with.

This blog is one of the most popular blogs that deals with the shooting sports. We have many tens of thousands of regular readers. Most of the time, this is a pretty fun place to be. But not yesterday.

Yesterday, a few people ruined the experience for everyone. They got into a political argument, and no party was willing to shut up. Back and forth, they kept zinging their comments, ruining the experience for everyone else.

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.22-caliber Lightweight Disco Double: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Disco Double new stock
The Lightweight Disco Double in its new stock looks striking!

Today, we’ll look at the Disco Double out at 50 yards. I used the best pellets from the 25-yard test to speed up this test. No sense going over the same ground twice.

The first pellet I tried was the JSB Exact Jumbo RS. It did the best at 25 yards, plus it’s so light, at 13.43 grains, that it gives the rifle a little extra zing.

The rifle arrived at the range filled to 2,000 psi, so I went right to work. I clicked the scope up 5 clicks in elevation to account for the greater distance and began shooting. The day was surprisingly cold — about 28 degrees F. My trigger finger had very little feeling, yet I was able to feel when stage 2 engaged on the trigger every time. That’s important on this rifle because the trigger is very light on stage 2.

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AirForce EscapeUL: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

AirForce Escape: Part 1
AirForce Escape: Part 2
AirForce Escape: Part 3

I’m testing 3 AirForce guns together — the Escape, the EscapeUL and the EscapeSS. All 3 are based on the same powerplant that is derived from the TalonP pistol. That’s why I am grouping them together like this. But each rifle has its own unique characteristics, too. And this is our look at the EscapeUL, which is the ultralight version of the rifle. It’s the lightest of the 3 air rifles and comes in either .22 or .25 caliber. I’m testing a .25.

Escape Escape SS Escape Ultralight
Escape on top, then Escape SS and finally Escape Ultralight on the bottom.

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Building the $100 precharged pneumatic air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

$100 PCP
The $100 PCP is built on a Crosman 2100B chassis.

This test was very interesting! It began last week at my outdoor rifle range. Blog reader GunFun1 asked me to try shooting steel BBs in this gun because it was originally built to handle them (when it was in its Crosman 2100B form). I didn’t want to do it because this rifle launches the first couple shots at over 900 f.p.s., and steel BBs rebound like crazy (You’ll shoot your eye out), but I did relent. Last week, I took this rifle to my outdoor range and stuck a 12-inch Shoot-N-C target on the plywood target backer. I then paced off 10 meters and fired 10 BBs at this target.

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The invisible airgunner

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

You always think the rest of the world thinks like you, until something shocks you awake. I’ve experienced this repeated times when it comes to airguns. I guess the first time was at the NRA Airgun Breakfast at a SHOT Show about 10-12 years ago. I was standing in the room talking to the late Bill Saunders of Air Arms when I noticed that a couple other gentlemen had silently walked up and were listening to us. Then, Ken asked me the question I have since come to recognize as a serious plea. He asked me where all the airgunners were in America.

He said his company had only been able to connect with about 30,000 serious airgunners, and he wondered where all the rest of them were. The look in his eye, and in the eyes of those around us, told me this was a very serious question. I told him that I knew of only about 15,000-30,000 serious airgunners (at that time), but that probably half of all firearms owners also owned at least one airgun. There are over 10 million firearms owners in this country, but most of them don’t think of themselves as airgunners. After a few more polite questions, the breakfast began and I thought that was it.

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R.A.I. adjustable AR stock adapter: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Today, I’ll begin testing the R.A.I. AR adjustable stock adapter from rarmsinnovations.com with the UTG Pro 6-position adjustable stock attached to the Benjamin Marauder pistol.

Length of pull
Before we begin, I want to say a word about the length of pull you get with this adapter. I gave the range of lengths in Part 1 as 14-1/8 inches to 17-1/8 inches, and that turned off many readers. In terms of conventional stocks, that pull range is very long! But Dave Rensing, who invented this adapter, made it for his 8-year-old son and his 7-year-old daughter. The son uses it conventionally, but the daughter collapses the stock past the first detent so it’s even shorter. Fully collapsed, the pull length measures exactly 14 inches but feels like 11 inches.

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