Ruger Model 3 32-40 schuetzen rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Background
  • What is schuetzen shooting?
  • Ruger Number 3 schuetzen
  • Breech seater
  • Hand rest
  • Scope fixed
  • Range time
  • What this means

I’m writing this report for German blog reader Stephan and for all of the readers who don’t know what schuetzen rifles are. Today our superstars come from film, music or team sports. In 1900, they were all shooters — schuetzen shooters, to be precise. The sport of offhand target shooting took off worldwide when breechloading rifles came onto the scene around the 1870s, and offhand target shooting became the sport of kings. Names like Pope, Hudson, Neidner and Farrow were on every kid’s lips in those days, and prizes that totaled $25,000 were awarded at matches at a time when the average annual family income was under $500.

read more


Gen 2 .25-caliber Benjamin Marauder: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Marauder air rifle Gen 2
Second-generation Benjamin Marauder in a synthetic stock.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Farewell Marv Freund
  • Some updates and corrections
  • Shooting the gun
  • Stabilizing the bipod
  • First group is the best
  • Baracuda Hunter Extreme pellets
  • Diana domed pellets
  • Possible change in comments

Farewell Marv Freund

Before I start today’s report, I must sadly announce that Marv Freund passed away last Friday evening. Marv was in his mid-80s and, in the words of Dennis Quackenbush, has been an “old lion” of airgunning for as long as I’ve been involved. Anyone who attended the airgun shows at Roanoke probably saw and spoke to him.

Marv was retired from the National Bureau of Standards before it became the National Institute for Standards and Technology. He was well-known for fixing and rebuilding music boxes and other complicated mechanical things. Marv is the man from whom I purchased my Nelson Lewis combination gun, the cased FWB 124 and my Falke 90.

read more


BSF S54 underlever: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

BSF S54
BSF S54 Match air rifle

This report covers:

  • Rear sight adjustment
  • Accuracy testing
  • First group
  • Group two
  • Group three
  • Conclusion and a shocker

Today, we start examining the accuracy of the BSF S54 Match rifle I’ve been testing for you. As you’ll remember, this rifle has already surprised me by being a lot more powerful than I expected. Many years ago, I owned a .22-caliber S54 that had target sights. I don’t think it was the Match model, but the action was the same as this one, except for the caliber. That gun wasn’t nearly as powerful as this one, which is what lead me to underestimate what this one would do. Apparently, I have an almost-new rifle whose action hasn’t even been broken-in yet.

read more


Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 2
Part 3

Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver
The new Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver comes in both silver and black. I’m testing a silver gun.

This report covers:

  • Description
  • Cartridges
  • Loading
  • Sights
  • Grip

When I recently tested the Gletcher Nagant BB revolver, several readers asked me to also test the pellet revolver. I had to wait for them to come in, but they have. So, today I’m starting my report on the Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver. There was a lot of interest in the Gamo PR-776 pellet revolver pellet revolver that I just finished testing, so I expect interest will be high for this one, as well.

Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver right
The right side of the gun looks very much like the BB revolver, and also the firearm.

read more


Testing the .177 Pelletgage: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Pelletgage
The Pelletgage comes in .177 caliber at the present. The holes are in a steel plate. A plastic plate above the gage plate helps guide the pellet head to the gage hole.

This report covers:

  • Description
  • The difference is obvious!
  • Head sizes
  • Every shot was perfect

The last test I ran on the .177-caliber Pelletgage (reported in part 3) was unintentionally flawed. I wasn’t sure at the time, but when my results were muddled and I examined the test plan, it was easy to see.

Description

The Pelletgage is a device that measures the diameter of pellet heads, so they can be sorted into groups of similar sizes. Pellets that come in the same package often have a range of different head sizes.

read more


Shooting the Rocket Shot target

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Rocket Shot target
  • Wind is bad
  • Emplacing the target
  • Loading the can
  • Crosman Super Match pellets
  • Shooting the target
  • Afterward
  • Overall impression

This report took me some time to schedule. I needed to find a safe place to shoot aerial targets with a pellet gun, and I needed good weather. We have had a lot of foul weather in Texas this year, so everything took time to line up. But last Saturday, it did.

Rocket Shot target

You first saw the Rocket Shot target in the Part 1 report on this year’s Malvern airgun show. I bought one with the intention of testing it for you and also putting it into my column in Shotgun News.

Rocket Shot is a spring-loaded soda-can-launcher that throws an empty can about 10-12 feet in the air when the paddle is hit. It sets up easily, loads easily and is more fun to shoot than I imagined. When I watched the company owners shooting the target on their website, it looked easy; but I’m the world’s worst instinct shooter, so I knew it wouldn’t be easy for me.

read more


Gamo PR-776 pellet revolver: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gamo PR-776 revolver
Gamo PR-776 pellet revolver.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Sights okay
  • First target
  • Shooting fast
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • Observations

This is the report people have been waiting for. How accurate is the Gamo PR-776 pellet revolver? If it proves accurate, the price is certainly in the right place for a revolver that has a real crane and swing out cylinder.

The day before performing this test, I had the revolver out on a test of the Rocket Shot target. I found the revolver doesn’t point naturally for me, and I was unsuccessful on the moving target. But I had a lot more confidence in this test.

Sights okay

I had thought I’d need to paint over the white dot sight on the front post to get real aiming precision; but when I lit the target brightly and shot from a darkened room, the dot became invisible. Dot sights are okay for pointing at a large mass, but they destroy any precision the sights may offer. Fortunately, the PR 776 sights have very rectangular angles; so, when they’re dark, they’re also pretty crisp.

read more