Gamo Compact target pistol: part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gamo Compact
Gamo’s Compact single stroke target pistol is back.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The sights
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • Gamo Match pellets
  • H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • The rest of the test
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day. We get to see what the Gamo Compact target pistol can do to a target at 10 meters. Let’s get right to it.

I shot the pistol at 10 meters with the gun rested on a sandbag. Since a single stroke pneumatic has no recoil, this is the best way to check the accuracy. I know there are some who believe the gun has to be held in a vise to check accuracy, but in the European factories they test the guns hand-held.

The sights

Remember that I adjusted the width of the rear sight notch in Part 2. It turned out that I got the width just about right for my eyes, so it was very easy to hold on-target. I pulled just one shot out of 40, and I will tell you which one when we get there.

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Beeman R1 supertune: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman R1
Beeman R1 Supermagnum air rifle.

This report covers:

  • 13-part tuning series
  • Honest talk
  • The ultimate tune
  • Malvern 2015
  • Bryan’s tune
  • Buttoning the piston
  • ARH mainspring and piston seal
  • Bronze spring guides
  • Smoother cocking arm
  • New cocking shoe
  • Stock screw escutcheons
  • Finish

Today we start looking at a rifle many of you already know. It is the Beeman R1 that was featured in my R1 book. While the R1 has changed since mine was purchased in 1994, the essence of the rifle remains the same as always. And the tuneups I’ve done over the years have pretty much obliterated what was originally in the rifle anyhow.

13-part tuning series

If you don’t know the rifle from my book, then perhaps you read about it in the 13-part report I did back in 2006. Not only did I use the rifle to show you the insides of a spring gun for the first time in this blog, I also tuned the rifle for you in that series.

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Pneumatic arrow shooters

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Everything old is new again
  • Feet per second (f.p.s.)
  • FX offers many arrow launchers
  • Missing the boat
  • What I would do
  • Advantages of a pneumatic arrow launcher
  • The downside
  • Summary

Everything old is new again

This will be a different kind of history report, because today the past is also the future. Today’s topic is one that has been touched on ever-so-lightly over the years, yet is also one of incredible significance today, when hunting with airguns is at the forefront of the hobby. I’m talking about airguns that launch arrows.

I’m not talking about crossbows, though they do serve as both the inspiration and the performance baseline for this subject. The airgun that launches arrows is very similar to the crossbow, except that it exceeds it in many important ways.

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The invention of rifling: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

The history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Fine rifling
  • The Trapdoor barrel
  • Bullet deformation is bad
  • Pope’s muzzleloading breech loaders
  • Dr. Hudson
  • Airguns and rifling
  • Twist rate
  • Diabolos and twist rate
  • One last question answered
  • Summary

I am running this report immediately after the Part 1 because of the questions several readers asked. I can see that the subject of rifling is not understood that well. I stopped the first report with the invention of Ballard rifling, which I said was shallow thin lands and wide grooves. Today I will start at that point.

Fine rifling

Ballard rifling was great because of what it did — or rather what it didn’t do. Ballard rifling did not deform the bullet as much as the other kinds of rifling I mentioned last time. You will recall that I said the development of the Trapdoor Springfield rifle marked a major advance in the development of ammunition. It did not do the same for rifled barrels.

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Gamo Compact target pistol: part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gamo Compact
Gamo’s Compact single stroke target pistol is back.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Trigger pull
  • On to velocity
  • Gamo Match pellets
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • On to the other velocity tests
  • Warming the pump head
  • Summary

Today is velocity day for the Gamo Compact target pistol, and you readers have given me several additional things you want tested. Let’s begin with a look at the trigger.

Trigger pull

I mentioned in Part 1 that the trigger on the test pistol feels heavier than mine did 19 years ago. It’s advertised to break at 3 lbs. and the one on the test pistol breaks at 3 lbs. 4 oz. out of the box. There is also some light creep (discernible movement and stopping in the second-stage pull). I told you I would see what I could do about this, so I removed the grips and looked at the trigger unit.

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The advantages of hunting with an airgun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is a guest blog about the advantages of airgun hunting by Pyramyd Air employee Derek Goins.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Now, over to you, Derek.

This report covers:

  • Introduction
  • Space
  • Noise level
  • Cost
  • Versatility
  • Some things to consider…

Introduction

Like a Carhartt-clad stone I sat motionless against a large oak tree, a rifle braced on my knees. The reluctant morning sun was just peeking into the horizon, bringing relief from the swirling fall winds biting at the back of my neck. A rain the night before left the ground soggy, the moist air heavy with the smell of earthworms and rotting leaves. Earwigs and tiny beetles fled through the humid dirt as I shifted my feet in an attempt to thaw my toes.

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POI shift when changing the scope’s power

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • The last test
  • TX200
  • First group at 14X
  • Second group at 6X
  • Third group at 14 X
  • The final group at 6X
  • Conclusions
  • Summary

This report is an unprecedented final look at how the point of impact (POI) changes when the power of a variable-power scope is changed. I linked to the 3 earlier reports in which this phenomenon was tested (it wasn’t tested in the first report of the Aeon scope, but I included it for continuity). The scope used in today’s report is different, so we will see whether that makes a difference to the results.

I had no intention of conducting this test, but then reader Silver Eagle asked this:

Can we try this same test with a airgun that does not have the variable pressure that a PCP has?
An accurate springer such as a TX200 or similar would help narrow it down if it is the scope or the rifle.

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