Diana’s model 5 air pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana model 5
This Diana model 5 air pistol is marked as a Winchester model 353.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Hobbys
  • A couple observations
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day for the Diana model 5 air pistol I’m testing, which is labeled a Winchester 353. We heard from several owners who like their pistols, so let’s see what this one can do.

The test

To get right into it, I didn’t know where the sights were adjusted. You may remember I mentioned that the rear sight was adjusted all the way over to the right. I decided to shoot the first group as the gun was set up. After that I could adjust the sights. All shooting was done from 10 meters with a 2-hand hold and my arms rested on a sandbag. I used a 6 o’clock hold.

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A light report — the UTG Compact Defense LED light

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

UTG Compact Defense light
UTG Compact Defense light.

This report covers:

  • 2017 SHOT Show
  • Let’s get real
  • Description
  • Main power
  • Lower power
  • L.I.B.R.E.
  • Runtime
  • Defense
  • Come on, BB — a light?
  • Side clip
  • Where to get one

The power went out in my neighborhood last evening, about 11:30 p.m. This time it was serious, because it’s now 7:10 a.m. the next morning and there is still no sign of restoration. [Note: the power was restored at 7:50 a.m.]

Power here in Texas is pretty reliable because this state is off the national power grid, but when I lived in Maryland that wasn’t the case. Power on the Eastern seaboard is iffy at best. So the Pelletier household was always well-stocked with alternative sources of illumination. I became a flashlight fanatic and now own more than 50 sources of portable light, including the Victorinox Midnight Manager pocket knife that is my constant companion.

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Benjamin Wildfire PCP repeater: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Wildfire
Benjamin Wildfire.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Fill problem
  • Air Venturi G6 pump
  • Sight alignment problems
  • Accuracy
  • Summary

I had some operational issues today and learned some things that may be useful to new owners of the Benjamin Wildfire. Today’s test was ostensibly to mount a dot sight and test the rifle for accuracy at 10 meters. This is in preparation for moving back to 25 yards.

Fill problem

First up is a problem I had when filling the rifle. I filled from two different large Carbon fiber tanks and both have this problem. When I try to bleed the line to disconnect the rifle from the tank, the pressure in the line holds the inlet valve of the rifle open and all the air in the reservoir leaks out.

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Colt Peacemaker BB pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Colt Peacemaker
The new Colt Peacemaker is also available with ivory grips.

This report covers:

  • 300-yard shots with an SAA?
  • The revolver
  • Hidden from view
  • What’s different about this one?
  • Hammer doesn’t go all the way down
  • A licensed Colt
  • The gun
  • Sights
  • Safety
  • Evaluation so far

When Umarex started making the Colt Single Action Army BB pistols a couple years ago, we all knew they had a large number of variations to go through. The most popular of these was the very first Colt SAA — the revolver with the 7.5-inch barrel that was also called the Peacemaker, The Frontier Six-Shooter and the Colt Army .45. This is the revolver so many western stars like Paladin and Marshal Dillon carried. It’s not the fastest in a gunfight, but for 300-yard shots, it’s the one to have.

300-yard shots with a handgun?

Yes. When I was a gunfighter at Frontier Village in San Jose, California, I used to shoot live ammo on my days off. I was reading Elmer Keith at the time and didn’t know that a handgun could not shoot accurately to 300 yards, so of course I tried it and found that it worked just as Keith described. Too bad Keith was a liar, because so much of what he wrote is still true today!

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BSF S70 air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSF S70
BSF S70 rifle is the father of several famous Weirauch models.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Today’s the day
  • Oiled the piston seal
  • RWS Hobby
  • Crosman Premier 7.9-grain
  • What’s up?
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Today’s the day

Today we find out how honest that Freimark is on my BSF S70 rifle. If you don’t know what Freimark is, read Part 1.

The Freimark is a German airgun mark that denotes a gun that does not exceed 7.5 joules power at the muzzle. That’s 5.53 foot-pounds. That would be a 7-grain RWS Hobby pellet moving 596 f.p.s. That will be our line in the sand.

From my experience with the BSF line, the S55/60/70/80 rifles (same powerplant in all of them) are above 7.5 joules all the time. That doesn’t mean there can’t be some that were made below that level, if German law allows. UK law states that if a model of an airgun can produce over 12 foot-pounds, then ievery one of them must be accompanied by a Firearms Certificate (FAC). They do not allow lower-powered versions of the same model gun to avoid that requirement. In other words, once a certain model needs an FAC, all of that same model need an FAC, regardless of what power they generate. But like I said, I don’t know how the German law reads.

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Diana’s model 5 air pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana model 5
This Diana model 5 air pistol is marked as a Winchester model 353.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • A valuable report!
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Oil
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • The oiling
  • Experience pays off
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • Back to Hobbys
  • How is it doing?
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Evaluation so far

Today’s the day I discover how healthy my new/old Diana model 5 (Winchester 353) air pistol is. This is best done with a chronograph, which is the Nth time I have told you that.

A valuable report!

Today’s test will be a valuable lesson in spring gun dynamics. Because of how I conducted it, this test shows things that are not often seen this clearly. Let’s begin.

RWS Hobby pellets

I wanted to know up front whether this pistol is in good condition or not. So I used the RWS Hobby pellet first. In my research for this report I found stated velocities for the Diana model 5 pistol between 375 f.p.s. and 450 f.p.s. Those numbers were no doubt obtained with a light pellet, and in the days that the model 5 was selling, lead pellets were the norm. I thought a lightweight lead pellet would have to give me the fastest average velocity. I was wrong, but let me tell you how the test went.

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ASG X9 Classic BB pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

ASG X9 Classic
ASG X9 Classic.

This report covers:

  • Strange things
  • Patterned after the M9
  • BB pistol
  • Action
  • Power
  • Not from Pyramyd Air
  • Summary

Strange things

Today I begin looking at the X9 Classic BB pistol from ASG. This CO2-powered pistol is unique in many ways. First, it was shipped with a box of plastic BBs that are called rubber on the box lid. Yes, this is a real steel BB pistol in every sense of the word, but it evolved from airsoft, and in this case it may not have left airsoft behind.

X9 Classic BBs
These are the first BB-sized airsoft balls I have seen. That’s a real steel BB and two 6mm airsoft BBs for comparison.

The next strange thing I noticed was a warning sticker on the bottom of the magazine that tells you to release the CO2 when you are finished shooting. The warning says this is to protect the o-ring seals, but I’ve not seen an o-ring that could not withstand constant pressurization. It will make the gun safer, though. They obviously mean this, so I will take them at their word — making this the first CO2 gun I’ve ever depressurized after shooting.

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