Generation 2 .25 caliber Benjamin Marauder: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Marauder air rifle Gen 2
Second-generation Benjamin Marauder in a synthetic stock.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • Not the normal test
  • Trigger adjusted again
  • The goal
  • Velocity test — JSB Exact Kings
  • Early hiccup!
  • Striker adjustment 1
  • Striker adjustment 2
  • Change of plans
  • The rifle’s performance with this adjustment

This is a continuation of the test I’m running on the .25-caliber gen 2 Benjamin Marauder. So far I have evaluated the rifle as it came from the box, adjusted the trigger, installed the exciting new UTG 2-16X44AO Accushot scope and UTG rubber armored folding metal bipod, sighted the rifle in at 25 yards and installed the RAI modular stock and folding butt extension. Then I went to the 50-yard range — twice — and shot the rifle for accuracy. That was where I discovered that the .25-caliber JSB Exact Kings are the best pellets for this rifle. And the .25-caliber Benjamin domes that have no brand name are a close second.

read more


Aeon 8-32 AO scope with trajectory reticle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Aeon 8-32X50 scope
Aeon 8-32X50 AO scope with trajectory reticle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • A long story
    One little problem
    At the range
    Good testbed
    The test
    The results
    Comments on the scope
    Next time

This report on the Aeon 8-32 AO scope with trajectory reticle was a long time coming. So long many of you won’t remember why I’m even writing it. The answer begins with a long story.

A long story

In the first part of this report I mentioned a shift in the point of impact that might have been caused by me changing the magnification while I shot the string, or it may have been caused by a Bullseye ZR 1-piece scope mount that I was testing. We never got that sorted out in that report and I said I would come back to it.

My plan was always to use my Talon SS at 50 yards for both tests –

read more


Air Venturi hand pump: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Venturi hand pump
Air Venturi G6 hand pump.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • The great challenge
  • History
  • An experiment reveals a lot
  • The trick
  • The dawn of modern high-pressure hand pumps
  • The Air Venturi G6 pump
  • Today’s test
  • My physiology
  • The test plug

The great challenge

Writing about the Air Venturi G6 hand pump is one of the most difficult reports I’ve ever attempted, because most airgunners know so little about hand pumps in general, and a lot of it is wrong. Also, because the audience for this subject spans the gamut from rank beginners to people who have owned other hand pumps for years, the spectrum of comprehension is infinite. Some people feel this is nothing more than an expensive bicycle pump, so I have to explain how it is different.

I read online discussions of hand pumps among airgunners, and I can tell that only a few of them have any actual experience. It goes beyond the blind leading the blind — it’s more like the blind writing detailed travel instructions to places they’ve never been.

read more


Air Venturi G6 hand pump: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Venturi hand pump
Air Venturi G6 hand pump.

This report covers:

  • Basic questions
  • Easy airguns to fill from a hand pump
  • Moderately easy airguns
  • PCPs that are harder to fill with hand pumps
  • PCPs you don’t want to fill with a hand pump!
  • Maintenance
  • Difficult to accept
  • Air Venturi G6
  • Test plug
  • Feel of the pump
  • Give me your thoughts

You want to come over to the dark side of airgunning (those who use precharged pneumatics), and you’re considering getting a hand pump to fill your airgun. This review will look at the Air Venturi G6 hand pump specifically; but before I dive into the description of this one pump, let me address some basic issues about hand pumps and precharged airguns in general.

Basic questions

The first question nearly everyone asks is how hard is it to fill an airgun with a hand pump, and should they consider going that route? My answer has always been another question. How much work are you prepared to do? If you have a riding lawnmower for a suburban yard of less than a half acre, maybe a pump is not for you. If you pay someone to mow your yard, it almost definitely isn’t right for you.

read more


Testing the .177 Pelletgage: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Before we start today’s blog, I wanted to remind you that we changed how to post a comment or reply to a comment on the blog. This was done mid-morning yesterday. If you’re having issues logging in or don’t know how to create an account, please email Edith (edith@pyramydair.com) for assistance.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Pelletgage
The .177-caliber Pelletgage. The holes are in a steel plate. A plastic plate above the gage plate helps guide the pellet head to the gage hole.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Pellet 1
  • Pellet 2
  • Pellet 3
  • Conclusions
  • Last comment

Today I’m taking the suggestion of blog reader Alan in Mich., who wondered if an air rifle with less of a pedigree than my TX200 Mark III would also benefit from the Pelletgage. I wondered the same thing, so I tested the Pelletgage using a Chinese B3-1 underlever rifle. Of all the air rifles around, this is the one without a pedigree.

read more


Back to the basics — Scope tips: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Use a bigger target
  • Don’t look through the sight when adjusting it!
  • Don’t go too far!
  • Don’t adjust on the basis of a single shot
  • Don’t change the reticle!
  • What have you learned?
  • Big bore match at the 2015 Texas airgun show
  • Coming tomorrow: Log-in to make a blog comment

I was at the range last week with my brother-in-law, Bob, who was visiting us for the Fourth of July. He brought his Colt AR-15 to get my help sighting-in, which I was glad to do. He has had a lot of problems sighting-in this rifle with optical sights, and I wanted to see what they were firsthand. Boy — am I glad I did! I think some of you will be, too, because this experience made today’s report.

Bob had already gone through several scopes on this rifle — never being satisfied with any of the results he got. This time, he had a dot sight mounted on the gun, and the mounts allowed him to also see the rifle’s standard peep sights. An AR-15 is hard to boresight (align the bore of the rifle with an optical sight) because you can’t see down the barrel. With a bolt rifle you can simply remove the bolt and look down the barrel while aligning the scope’s reticle. When the bullseye appears to be centered in the barrel at the same time the crosshairs are centered inside the bull, you’re boresighted. A shot at this point should strike pretty close to the bullseye.

read more


Testing the .177 Pelletgage: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Pelletgage
The Pelletgage comes in .177 caliber at the present. The holes are in a steel plate. A plastic plate above the gage plate helps guide the pellet head to the gage hole.

This report covers:

  • Description
  • The difference is obvious!
  • Head sizes
  • Every shot was perfect

The last test I ran on the .177-caliber Pelletgage (reported in part 3) was unintentionally flawed. I wasn’t sure at the time, but when my results were muddled and I examined the test plan, it was easy to see.

Description

The Pelletgage is a device that measures the diameter of pellet heads, so they can be sorted into groups of similar sizes. Pellets that come in the same package often have a range of different head sizes.

read more