Back to the basics — Scope tips: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Droop — or downward slant
  • My point is…
  • I must care about this
  • Scope placement

This series examines the task of mounting a scope on an air rifle and sighting it in. Part 2 addressed mounting a scope, but it didn’t cover all of the problem areas, so today I’ll continue the discussion.

Droop — or downward slant

I will say that 80 percent of all the firearms and airguns I have examined have some degree of downward slant of their bores in relation to the line of sight of a scope that’s mounted on them. And I will go on to say that half of those are so serious as to cause problems. The airgun term for this is droop. The firearm world has no term for it and is generally ignorant of the problem. The single firearm that doesn’t seem to have this problem to the extent mentioned here is the AR platform. Perhaps the designers recognized the problem and solved it through engineering. I don’t know, but ARs seem to be relatively droop-free.

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Aeon 8-32X50 AO scope with trajectory reticle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSA Supersport SE: Part 4

This report covers:

  • Is compact good?
  • The trajectory reticle
  • Thin reticle
  • Buy this trajectory reticle for targets, only
  • And the scope?
  • Brightness
  • Image area
  • Reaction to recoil
  • Do scopes need to be broken in?
  • Evaluation so far

Today I start looking at the Aeon 8-32X50 AO scope with trajectory reticle. We actually began our look in the final section of the BSA Supersport SE review, which is why there’s a link to Part 4 of that review at the top of this page.

For starters, I said this is the shortest 8-32x scope I’ve ever seen. I showed you a picture of the scope mounted on the BSA rifle, but the only comments that picture got were about the Diana Bullseye ZR recoil-reducing scope mount. Apparently not many of you own an 8-32X scope; and so when you see one that’s several inches shorter, it doesn’t make much of an impression. So, the first thing I’ll do today is show you the Aeon scope next to a UTG 8-32X (no longer made), so you can appreciate what I’m saying. The Aeon is 13.75 inches long, compared to 17.52 inches for the UTG.

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Back to the basics — Scope tips: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

• What we’re doing
• Many things going on
• First things when mounting scopes
• Clean the gun and mount
• The mount
• Installing the mount
• Install the scope
• Install top caps and screws
• Align the vertical reticle
• Time to tighten the caps

What we’re doing
Today, I’m going to mount a scope for you and show some of my mounting techniques. These have been available for 10 years in the Pyramyd Air articles pages as a 3-part series — Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3.

Many things going on
I’ll also add some things to this report. For starters, I’m making this a multiple blog by also reporting on the new Diana Bullseye ZR recoil reducing scope mount. And, I’m installing this mount on the BSA Supersport SE that I promised would have a Part 4. Another benefit! Finally, I selected the Aeon 8-32X50 AO scope with trajectory reticle for the rifle. The special trajectory reticle can be useful when shooting rifles at different distances. Aeon also has the same scope equipped with other reticles.

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Back to the basics — Scope tips: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Reason for this report
  • What I won’t do!
  • Things to consider when mounting a scope
    • Consider the scope mounts.
    • Consider the type of scope
    • Consider the gun and where the scope has to fit
    • Pay attention to how much elevation your new scope needs
    Summary

    Reason for this report
    This report is for a friend who recently acquired a new-to-him 30-06 bolt-action rifle. He asked me for some tips on mounting a scope and sighting-in the rifle, and I’m afraid what I gave him was a college-level course instead of the basic information he needed. Despite my “help,” he stumbled through the process, making many mistakes as he learned what I am going to try to tell you in this report.

    This misadventure opened my eyes to a need for even more basic instruction about rifle scopes. If my friend is having problems, so are hundreds of others who read this blog.

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UTG Monopod v-rest and camera adapter: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

UTG Monopod V-rest and camera adapter
UTG Monopod v-rest and camera adapter.

This report covers:

• Bipods are very steady
• Sitting higher is easier on the back
• How I use the monopod
• It really works!
• The camera adapter

When I introduced the UTG Monopod v-rest and camera adapter before Christmas, I made some big claims about its stability. Claims like this monopod is steadier than most of the bipods on the market. Today, I’m prepared to back that up with explanations and pictures.

Bipods are very steady
Make no mistake — a bipod used correctly can be very steady — even benchrest steady. The problem is that they’re often not being used correctly, especially by field target shooters, which is what I want to talk about today.

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UTG Monopod v-rest and camera adapter: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

UTG Monopod B-rest and camera adapter
UTG Monopod v-rest and camera adapter.

This report covers:

• Why a bipod (or monopod)?
• The hold
• Description
• Adjustment
• Summary

Today, we’ll begin looking at the UTG Monopod v-rest and camera adapter from Leapers. This was first shown at the 2014 SHOT Show; and, since I was planning on using sticks (a bipod) for field target anyway, I wondered if this would be an acceptable substitute? It took most of the year to finalize the design, and I got mine just before the Pyramyd Air Cup in October. It was the final pre-production prototype, but there were very few changes made for production.

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Things you need when you buy a PCP

by Tom Gaylord, The Godfather of Airguns™
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Equipment to fill the gun
• Silicone chamber oil
• Diver’s silicone grease
• Plumber’s tape
• No such thing as Teflon tape
• A chronograph tells the whole story
• Other things?
• Summary

Today, I’m writing this for the sales representatives at Pyramyd Air, who are always asked what else you’ll need when you buy a precharged airgun. Precharged airguns need some things to go with them to operate smoothly. Think of  the batteries you always need for electronics. Are they included in the box or do you have to buy them extra?

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