Diana 240 Classic:Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 240 Classic
Diana 240 Classic.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Which pellets?
  • The test
  • First 5 shots
  • Second 5 shots
  • Artillery hold wins
  • Tune in a Tube
  • 10 JSB RS pellets
  • 10 RWS Hobbys
  • 10 Crosman Premier lites
  • Pellet skirt damage
  • Evaluation thus far

I love my job! Today, the kid gets to play with a youth air rifle that’s easy to cock, has a nice trigger and, according to the velocity figures we saw in Part 2 of this report, plus the pedigree of the maker (Diana), should turn out to be very accurate. It’s as if I was employed by Santa Claus to test all the new airguns before he carts them off to their new owners all over the world. And, every two hours I get a break for hot chocolate! I love my job!

My job today is to begin to discover how accurate the Diana 240 Classic air rifle is. Like always, I will start at 10 meters and shoot with open sights.

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El Gamo 68-XP .22 caliber: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

El Gamo XP-68
The El Gamo XP-68.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Sighting in
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Superdome
  • RWS Hobbys
  • Evaluation so far

Today I will shoot the .22-caliber El Gamo 68-XP for accuracy at 10 meters. I have full use of my right eye that I normally use for sighting, so everything was very clear in today’s test.

For some reason I only shot 5-shot groups instead of 10-shot groups today. The rifle is easy to load and shoot, so I don’t understand why I did this, but I did. For the first group, though, I actually shot 6 shots. I will explain.

Sighting in

I shot off a sandbag rest, using the artillery hold. The first shot hit a couple inches below the target paper, so I cranked in a lot of elevation in the rear sight thumbwheel. That brought shot number 2 up to just under the bull at 6 o’clock. I was using a 6 o’clock hold, so the rifle was now hitting exactly where the sights were placed at 10 meters.

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BB’s Christmas gift: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
Like all Supergrades, my new rifle is graceful and attractive.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • No front sight
  • The test
  • Beeman Silver Jets
  • Sheridan Cylindricals
  • Crosman Premiers
  • About the same
  • Velocity
  • Variable pumps with Crosman Premier pellets
  • Stability
  • Conclusion

Well, after the last session when the pump mechanism and valve seemed to be fixed I was all set to start testing the Sheridan Supergrade for accuracy. The first thing I did was hoist the rifle to my shoulder, to see whether I could see the front sight through the rear peep. Oh no! I couldn’t see it! So I switched shoulders and looked with my left eye. Oh no! I couldn’t even see it with that eye — the eye I have been calling my good eye. Was there even a front sight on the gun?

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Diana K98 pellet rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana K98
Diana’s K98 Mauser pellet rifle is very realistic.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • First scope
  • First scope failed!
  • 10X fixed power UTG scope
  • The test
  • JSB RS
  • My eye
  • JSB Exact 15.89-grain
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Conclusion

I last tested the Diana Mauser K98 air rifle on December 20 of last year. On that day my right eye was so bad that I couldn’t even see the sights when wearing my glasses, so I had to shoot that test left-handed. Even so, I managed to shoot a 10-shot group that was almost one-inch at 25 yards. And I did it with the rifle rested directly on a sandbag!

First scope

Today I mounted an old Leapers 3-12 SWAT mil dot scope that happened to be attached to high rings that were sitting on a prototype Leapers drooper base. This base will fit the new Diana scope bases on the rifles. The scope was so old it was from the pre-UTG days. It just says Leapers on the tube.

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Why own a chronograph?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • No preaching
  • Evaluate an old airgun
  • Test pellets
  • Evaluate a tuneup
  • For detailed tuning and product development
  • What it isn’t

Today is my cataract surgery. I don’t know how well I will be able to function online for the next several days, so will you veteran readers please help the new guys? I know you always do, but I’m just telling you what’s happening.

If you have read this blog for very long you can answer the title question for yourself, because I write about chronographs all the time. I use them for big things like testing the health of a new acquisition (the Sharp Ace Target and the Sheridan Supergrade), and things more subtle (testing the Air Arms Galahad).

No preaching

I used to preach about when to use a chrono and when not to, but I’m not going to do that today. Use it whenever you like and for whatever reason suits you.

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Firearm pellet adaptor: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Must load from the front of the cartridge
  • Sizing pellets to fit into the mouth of the case
  • How deep is the pellet seated?
  • A lot of “stuff” to support the adaptor
  • The stuff
  • The test
  • Benchrest
  • Surprise!
  • Shot 4
  • Discussion

Today we look at the accuracy of the firearm pellet adaptor. This is what we have been interested in all along. In Part 2 we saw that the velocity was stable when the pellets were loaded deep inside the neck of the adaptor, but not when they sat proud. That generated several questions that I will address before I get to the test. Everything I do today was done with the .22-caliber JSB Exact Jumbo pellet.

Must load from the front of the cartridge

Several readers wondered what might happen if the pellet was pushed in from the rear of the cartridge, rather than loaded from the front. The dents at the base of the cartridge case shoulders prevent that from happening, though I expect you could push a pellet through if you used a lot of force.

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Why can’t “they” get it right?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • A great idea
  • The 160
  • Pellets were the key
  • What if…
  • The lesson
  • Not picking on Crosman
  • The point
  • QB78 is okay

I was set to report on another vintage air rifle today, when yesterday I got a superb comment that prompted today’s report. Reader reallead was responding to a comment from reader Halfstep, who was wondering about the accuracy of his QB78. Let’s look at it now.

Halfstep,
Being the owner of a QB77 I’d like to add my comments. I bought my QB77 from MAC 1 in Calif. several years ago. According to the imprinted receiver, it was made (imported?) by Sportsman Airguns. Someone told me that QBs were actually made in Korea, but I don’t know for sure since I can’t find the country where it was made anywhere on the gun. [Editor — As far as I know, the QB air rifles were all made in The People’s Republic of China.]

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