Reality check

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Update on Edith
Edith was transferred back to the ICU because her oxygen level had dropped low. Her doctor ordered X-rays and a CAT scan to try to find out what is happening. The Guillain Barre Syndrome has been fully treated now, but here is the deal. The myelin sheaths on her nerves has been destroyed and hasn’t regenerated yet. With GBS it will do so, but it takes time. Imagine a complex electronic device that’s submerged in water all the time. Then the insulation get’s stripped off the wires. That’s what has happened to Edith.

They found large blood clots in her veins in the lungs, so she was fitted with a mask to force pure O2 into her lungs. They are worried that the clots may grow and obstruct her blood flow, so they put a clot filter in her inferior vena cava. And they are giving her blood thinners through the IV to keep the clots from growing. The next 48 hours are very critical to her.

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What do you do when…?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Scopes move ALL the time
  • The secret to scope movement
  • Scopes move for other reasons
  • The secret to parallax elimination
  • The secret to parallax elimination
  • Open sights are rarely sighted-in
  • The secret to hitting what you shoot at
  • Magazine feeding problems
  • Making bad triggers good
  • Live with it

Today I’m going to talk about some things that never come up as full topics, but do get discussed peripherally a lot! I’m referring to the little things you encounter at the shooting range — the quirks that all guns, both firearms and airguns, bring to the table.

Scopes move ALL the time

I was at the range a couple weeks ago with Bob, my brother-in-law. We were sighting-in his AR-15 and also shooting a Mauser that Otho had. Bob mentioned once that even though he was shooting from a rest, he could never get Otho’s scope to stop moving.

Hollywood has taught the non-shooting public that images seen through rifle scopes are completely still and in sharp focus. Shooters know different. No matter who you are the image in the scope will always move. Just your heartbeat is enough to make it move, though people don’t appreciate that until they become shooters. It’s one reason some people prefer iron sights. The image still moves with them, but you can’t detect it nearly as easily.

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Colt Single Action Army BB gun: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord

Writing as B.B. Pelletier

 

Colt Single Action Army BB revolver
The new Colt Single Action Army BB revolver is gorgeous!

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • It started as a conversation
  • Cartridges are the key
  • Use the same cartridges
  • The test
  • Ah-ha!
  • 25-foot test
  • Summary

It started as a conversation

A couple weeks ago, several readers had a discussion on the blog about shooting the Colt Single Action Army BB revolver with pellets. I didn’t read everything they said in detail, but the basic idea stayed with me for several days until I began to wonder, “Why not?” Back in 2013, I tested the Diana model 25 smoothbore pellet gun and discovered that it’s very accurate out to 10 meters — even though there’s no rifling to spin the pellet. Why wouldn’t this BB revolver also be accurate?

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Testing the .177 Pelletgage: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Before we start today’s blog, I wanted to remind you that we changed how to post a comment or reply to a comment on the blog. This was done mid-morning yesterday. If you’re having issues logging in or don’t know how to create an account, please email Edith (edith@pyramydair.com) for assistance.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Pelletgage
The .177-caliber Pelletgage. The holes are in a steel plate. A plastic plate above the gage plate helps guide the pellet head to the gage hole.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Pellet 1
  • Pellet 2
  • Pellet 3
  • Conclusions
  • Last comment

Today I’m taking the suggestion of blog reader Alan in Mich., who wondered if an air rifle with less of a pedigree than my TX200 Mark III would also benefit from the Pelletgage. I wondered the same thing, so I tested the Pelletgage using a Chinese B3-1 underlever rifle. Of all the air rifles around, this is the one without a pedigree.

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BSF S54 underlever: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

BSF S54
BSF S54 Match air rifle

This report covers:

  • Rear sight adjustment
  • Accuracy testing
  • First group
  • Group two
  • Group three
  • Conclusion and a shocker

Today, we start examining the accuracy of the BSF S54 Match rifle I’ve been testing for you. As you’ll remember, this rifle has already surprised me by being a lot more powerful than I expected. Many years ago, I owned a .22-caliber S54 that had target sights. I don’t think it was the Match model, but the action was the same as this one, except for the caliber. That gun wasn’t nearly as powerful as this one, which is what lead me to underestimate what this one would do. Apparently, I have an almost-new rifle whose action hasn’t even been broken-in yet.

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Testing the .177 Pelletgage: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Pelletgage
The Pelletgage comes in .177 caliber at the present. The holes are in a steel plate. A plastic plate above the gage plate helps guide the pellet head to the gage hole.

This report covers:

  • Description
  • The difference is obvious!
  • Head sizes
  • Every shot was perfect

The last test I ran on the .177-caliber Pelletgage (reported in part 3) was unintentionally flawed. I wasn’t sure at the time, but when my results were muddled and I examined the test plan, it was easy to see.

Description

The Pelletgage is a device that measures the diameter of pellet heads, so they can be sorted into groups of similar sizes. Pellets that come in the same package often have a range of different head sizes.

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Shooting the Rocket Shot target

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Rocket Shot target
  • Wind is bad
  • Emplacing the target
  • Loading the can
  • Crosman Super Match pellets
  • Shooting the target
  • Afterward
  • Overall impression

This report took me some time to schedule. I needed to find a safe place to shoot aerial targets with a pellet gun, and I needed good weather. We have had a lot of foul weather in Texas this year, so everything took time to line up. But last Saturday, it did.

Rocket Shot target

You first saw the Rocket Shot target in the Part 1 report on this year’s Malvern airgun show. I bought one with the intention of testing it for you and also putting it into my column in Shotgun News.

Rocket Shot is a spring-loaded soda-can-launcher that throws an empty can about 10-12 feet in the air when the paddle is hit. It sets up easily, loads easily and is more fun to shoot than I imagined. When I watched the company owners shooting the target on their website, it looked easy; but I’m the world’s worst instinct shooter, so I knew it wouldn’t be easy for me.

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