How to write a guest blog

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Guest blog requests
  • The legal stuff
  • The technical stuff
  • Other stuff
  • Hank’s questions
  • B.B.’s faults

Guest blog requests

Reader Vana2, whose real name is Hank, suggested today’s topic and it is a perfect one. We ask people who want to write a guest blog to contact us before they send anything in, because there are several things they need to know. The first thing to do is contact us. We always say please email us at the start of each guest blog, and that link opens an email window for your contact message.

When we answer you, sometimes we ask what your blog is about. Most of the time, though, people tell us what they want to write about up front, so we can get right into the instructions. The first part is the legal stuff. Here is what we say:

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Reality check

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Update on Edith
Edith was transferred back to the ICU because her oxygen level had dropped low. Her doctor ordered X-rays and a CAT scan to try to find out what is happening. The Guillain Barre Syndrome has been fully treated now, but here is the deal. The myelin sheaths on her nerves has been destroyed and hasn’t regenerated yet. With GBS it will do so, but it takes time. Imagine a complex electronic device that’s submerged in water all the time. Then the insulation get’s stripped off the wires. That’s what has happened to Edith.

They found large blood clots in her veins in the lungs, so she was fitted with a mask to force pure O2 into her lungs. They are worried that the clots may grow and obstruct her blood flow, so they put a clot filter in her inferior vena cava. And they are giving her blood thinners through the IV to keep the clots from growing. The next 48 hours are very critical to her.

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What do you do when…?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Scopes move ALL the time
  • The secret to scope movement
  • Scopes move for other reasons
  • The secret to parallax elimination
  • The secret to parallax elimination
  • Open sights are rarely sighted-in
  • The secret to hitting what you shoot at
  • Magazine feeding problems
  • Making bad triggers good
  • Live with it

Today I’m going to talk about some things that never come up as full topics, but do get discussed peripherally a lot! I’m referring to the little things you encounter at the shooting range — the quirks that all guns, both firearms and airguns, bring to the table.

Scopes move ALL the time

I was at the range a couple weeks ago with Bob, my brother-in-law. We were sighting-in his AR-15 and also shooting a Mauser that Otho had. Bob mentioned once that even though he was shooting from a rest, he could never get Otho’s scope to stop moving.

Hollywood has taught the non-shooting public that images seen through rifle scopes are completely still and in sharp focus. Shooters know different. No matter who you are the image in the scope will always move. Just your heartbeat is enough to make it move, though people don’t appreciate that until they become shooters. It’s one reason some people prefer iron sights. The image still moves with them, but you can’t detect it nearly as easily.

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Air Venturi Tech Force M8: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Ari Venturi M8
Air Venturi M8 is very much like the Bronco.

This report covers:

  • Comparison
  • Stock
  • Powerplant
  • Double trigger blade
  • What is it?

Here is an alert to everyone who missed getting an Air Venturi Bronco. From what I see so far, just having taken the .177 caliber Air Venturi Tech Force M8 out of the box and shooting it a couple times, this rifle is as good as the Bronco. For some of you it is even better, as you will learn today.

Comparison

The M8 is practically identical to the Bronco. Both rifles are 40 inches long and weigh 6.5 lbs. The M8 stock has a slightly longer pull of 13 inches, to the Bronco’s 12-1/2 or 12-3/4 inches. Both rifles are said to cock with 18 lbs. of effort, which puts them into the comfortable range. The Bronco came with adjustable open sights, while the M8 has no sights. Both rifles have the 2-bladed 2-stage trigger that uses the first blade to take up stage one of the pull.

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Field Target Team USA’s test of the JSB FT Premium pellets: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Before we start, here is an update on Edith. Sunday was the last application of the medicine for Guillain Barre Syndrome. She was still in pain and only able to move her legs a very little, plus she had not eaten much in the past 5 days, so she’s weak. I got her to eat some fruit, which she enjoyed.  I hope they have diagnosed her condition correctly and that she responds to the cure. I guess we now have to wait and see.

Apparently you readers let me miss a day of the blog last week. It was written, but just not published, because I am so new to doing the admin stuff. Therefore, I have an extra blog for this week, which I really needed.

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Best of B.B.: My first airgun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

I had to take Edith to the emergency room yesterday and when I returned home there were only 4 hours left to write and publish today’s blog. She is not well, and we don’t know what it is yet. In fact, we’re going to another ER tonight at the advice of the wife of Pyramyd Air’s president (who is a physician). She was surprised that the first hospital never tested Edith for an obvious illness. I will keep you updated as we learn more.

Today I am rerunning an old blog from the past. This one was published on November 11, 2005. Enjoy!

I’ll tell you about my first airgun, then I want YOU to tell me about YOURS!
A Benjamin 107 pistol


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Air Venturi hand pump: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Venturi hand pump
Air Venturi G6 hand pump.

This report covers:

  • Basic questions
  • Easy airguns to fill from a hand pump
  • Moderately easy airguns
  • PCPs that are harder to fill with hand pumps
  • PCPs you don’t want to fill with a hand pump!
  • Maintenance
  • Difficult to accept
  • Air Venturi G6
  • Test plug
  • Feel of the pump
  • Give me your thoughts

You want to come over to the dark side of airgunning (those who use precharged pneumatics), and you’re considering getting a hand pump to fill your airgun. This review will look at the Air Venturi G6 hand pump specifically; but before I dive into the description of this one pump, let me address some basic issues about hand pumps and precharged airguns in general.

Basic questions

The first question nearly everyone asks is how hard is it to fill an airgun with a hand pump, and should they consider going that route? My answer has always been another question. How much work are you prepared to do? If you have a riding lawnmower for a suburban yard of less than a half acre, maybe a pump is not for you. If you pay someone to mow your yard, it almost definitely isn’t right for you.

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