Gletcher Stechkin APS BB pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gletcher Stetckin APS BB pistol
Gletcher’s Stechkin blowback BB pistol.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Velocity day
  • Piercing pin
  • Daisy BBs
  • Slide stays back after the last shot
  • Air Venturi Copper-Plated BBs
  • Umarex BBs
  • Shot count
  • Don’t count on the brand of CO2 cartridge!
  • Recoil from the blowback
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Velocity day

We learned a lot about the Soviet Stechkin select-fire pistol in Part 1, or at least I did, when researching it. Today we discover how powerful this Gletcher Stechkin APS BB pistol is. I will also comment on the trigger and the blowback feel.

Piercing pin

The pistol is rated to shoot at 410 f.p.s., so let’s see what this one will do. Before we dive in, though, let me give you a peek at the piercing pin and corresponding CO2 cartridge seal.

Stetckin BB pistol piercing pin
The piercing pin is hard to see because it’s slightly out of focus. It’s a hollow tube that’s ground on an angle on one side to have a pointed tip on the other side. The green around it is the seal material that the face of the cartridge pushes into.

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Gletcher Stechkin APS BB pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gletcher Stetckin APS BB pistol
Gletcher’s Stechkin blowback BB pistol.

This report covers:

  • Stechkin firearm
  • BB pistol is not full-auto!
  • This handgun is BIG!
  • Loading
  • Sights
  • Heavy
  • Finish
  • Summary

Today we start looking at the Gletcher Stechkin APS BB pistol. Let’s define up front what this is and what it is not. This BB pistol is an all-metal full-sized BB pistol that operates on CO2. It is both double and single action, so the slide blowing back cocks the hammer for the next shot. This is a true semiautomatic BB pistol with a two-stage single action trigger that’s reasonably crisp.

Stechkin firearm

The Stechkin was a sidearm of the Soviet military in the early 1950s, but proved too heavy and cumbersome (not to mention too expensive to produce) to be issued to regular combat troops. It was resurrected to be issued to elite forces when I was in the Army in the 1970s. Then it was issued to special troops like Spetsnaz commandos. It is a select-fire (both semiautomatic and fully automatic) pistol, chambered for the 9mm Makarov cartridge. That cartridge is considered adequate in Europe and the former Soviet Union, but being roughly equivalent to the Western .380 ACP, it is weak side in the eyes of the U.S. military and law enforcement communities.

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Crosman’s V-300 BB pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman V-300 BB pistol
Crosman V-300 BB pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Update on the 2017 Texas Airgun Show
  • Update on the V-300
  • The test
  • Crosman Copperhead BBs on high power
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs on high power
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs on low power
  • Crosman Copperhead BBs on low power
  • Summary

Update on the 2017 Texas Airgun Show

If you have plans to get a table at the 2017 Texas Airgun Show, you had better move fast! The inside of the hall is almost sold out! AirForce and Sun Optics have decided to move outside, to make more room inside for private dealers, but there is still not much room left. There will be room on the covered porch outside the hall, and there will be two large swamp-cooling fans to help with the heat so there is still some room left, but when that is filled the show will be sold out.

I expect to announce a major attraction soon who will draw many more firearms shooters. He is coming to film the show for his You Tube channel. Those who attended last year will tell you this show is jam-packed and there is a lot of money spent, so make your reservations today. For registration information, read their show flier. Now, let’s get to the report.

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Crosman’s V-300 BB pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman V-300 BB pistol
Crosman V-300 BB pistol.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • I’m learning, too
  • The poppet valve
  • How it works
  • Velocity — Crosman BBs
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Somebody recently thanked me for admitting I don’t know everything. Guys, if the truth be told, I don’t know more than most of you. Some of what I know is just because I’m old, and other stuff is because I’ve had a lifelong fascination with guns.

I’m learning, too

I learn from this blog just like most of you. A lot of that comes when I research things, but every so often you readers tell me things. That happened in the comments to Part 1 of this report. Reader Kevin told us that he believed those three detents in the V-300’s cocking mechanism were for three different power levels. I immediately went to my pistol and tried it and found he is right! We will see that today.

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Crosman’s V-300 BB pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman V-300 BB pistol
Crosman V-300 BB pistol.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • For those who care
  • History
  • M1 Carbine
  • Enter the V-300
  • The model name
  • Oiling, loading and cocking
  • Sights
  • General specifications
  • Summary

Sometimes I write these historical reports about airguns that many of us know and have either owned or wanted. The Beeman R8 is one example. American readers could have bought one when they were new and readers from other parts of the world could have bought the now-obsolete Weirauch HW 50S that it was based upon. Both air rifles are no longer produced, but used examples should be available in their respective markets. And Weihrauch does still make a rifle they call the HW 50S, although it is based on a different platform.

Then there are times when I dredge up some strange airguns that few of us have ever seen. The Lov 21 target pistol I recently reported on is such a gun. Unfortunately I have jammed the CO2 fill cap in the gun and am still trying to extract it so I can write the accuracy report. That one will have to wait, but it wasn’t the only odd duck I found at the Findlay airgun show this year. Today we start looking at a scarce and little-known BB pistol that Crosman once produced — the V-300.

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Sig P320 pellet and BB pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig P320 pistol
Sig P320 pellet and BB pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Analysis
  • Trigger
  • Belt reliability
  • Air Venturi Smart Shot BBs
  • Evaluation

Today I look at the accuracy of the Sig Sauer P320 pellet pistol with BBs. These combination guns can sometimes be great with both BBs and pellets, but usually they are good with one and not as good with the other. The difference is due to the size difference of the projectiles. We will look at the accuracy with pellets in Part 4, so today it’s just BBs.

The test

I shot from 5 meters (just over 16 feet) with the pistol resting on the UTG Monopod. I was seated, so only the pistol was being tested — not me. This pistol has good crisp sights for target work, though they are not adjustable.

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Sig P320 pellet and BB pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig P320 pistol
Sig P320 pellet and BB pistol.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Loading
  • Is there a magnet?
  • Mag feed direction
  • Velocity
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • Pellets — RWS Hobbys
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • Yes, BB, but how fast is it?
  • The trigger
  • Evaluation

Today I test the velocity of the new Sig Sauer P320 pellet pistol. But before I get to that, I need to address loading the magazine. Some people find the 30-shot belt daunting to load because it doesn’t move easily for them. Sig sent me some additional instructions and a short video to describe the process.

Be sure to allow time for the video to upload! It might help to refresh the page.

Loading

To load the 320 magazine, the back cover is lifted up, giving you access to the pellet chambers that Sig calls “seats.” A pellet or BB is pressed into each of these, and because you are loading from the back, put the nose of each pellet in first — in the direction you want it to come out of the muzzle. BBs are spherical, so the orientation doesn’t matter. Let’s look at the video.

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