What I got for Christmas

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Good morning and Happy Day After Christmas. I thought today that we could all share some of the special gifts we got for Christmas. I know some of you don’t celebrate Christmas; but from the comments, I can see that many of you have been rewarding yourselves with holiday gifts, nonetheless. So, join in if you want.

My first gift
The first gift of the season was a Sears BB gun that’s an 1894 model made by Daisy. My brother-in-law, Bob, picked it up in an antique store. It doesn’t work, but I read online that these often do go bad after storage for several years. I’ll attempt repairs on my own; but if I’m not successful, I’ll probably get another working 1894, because I know many of our readers really love this gun. It was Daisy’s first Spittin’ Image BB gun, with production starting in 1961 and continuing until 1986. This variation was made for Sears from 1969 until 1973. One way or another, you’ll probably be reading a review of the 1894 Daisy in 2015.

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Best of B.B.: Two BB guns you’ll never see

By Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today is Christmas Eve, and I’m entertaining my family. Instead of writing a new report, I went way back in the archives and dug up something interesting from the past. This is about two BB guns that are so rare that they aren’t cataloged anywhere that I know of, yet I’ve seen a couple of each one at airgun shows over the years.

Remember, as you read this, I originally wrote it in 2005. And to all my readers to whom it applies — Merry Christmas!

Two BB guns you’ll never see

Today is a fun day. Imagine that you’re working at the Daisy Manufacturing Company around the year 1960. It might have been a few years earlier, but probably not much later.

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Webley Mark VI BB revolver: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark VI revolver
Webley Mark VI BB revolver.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

• Accuracy test design
• Let’s begin
• What’s the verdict?

Let’s look at the accuracy of the new Webley Mark VI BB revolver. I tested it for velocity with 5 premium BBs. Now that I’ve seen how much interest there is in this revolver, I’m going to test it with all 5 of those BBs. Since the cylinder holds 6 shots, I’m shooting 6-shot groups in this test.

Accuracy test design
I will be shooting from a rested 5-meter position. For the rest, I’ll use the new UTG Monopod that I’ve been testing since October. Tomorrow, I will begin the review of that piece of equipment that I believe is as good as the best bipods.

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Hornady Black Diamond BBs: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

• The test
• 499 — Precision Ground Shot
• 499 — Daisy Premium Grade BBs
• 499 — Hornady Black Diamond BBs
• 880 — Precision Ground Shot
• 880 — Daisy Premium Grade BBs
• 880 — Hornady Black Diamond BBs
• Overall evaluation

Today, we’ll continue the report on Hornady Black Diamond BBs and look at the accuracy. For this test I selected the same 2 BB guns that were used for the velocity test — the Daisy Avanti Champion 499 and the ever-popular Daisy 880 multi-pump.

The test
The groups were all 10-shot groups, shot from 5 meters (16 feet, 4 inches). I was seated and used a UTG Monopod. This monopod is as steady as the best bipods I’ve seen — and better than most. You may find that difficult to believe, but I’ll do a separate report on its use very soon and show you how I use it to make it so steady. For all practical purposes, this was similar to shooting off a sandbag rest.

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Webley Mark VI BB revolver: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark VI revolver
Webley Mark VI BB revolver.

Part 1

This report covers:

• Longevity
• The gun
• Velocity
• Double-action
• Back to single-action
• How many good shots on a cartridge?
• Trigger-pull
• Evaluation so far

We received a lot of comments on Part 1 of this report. Apparently, the Webley Mark VI BB revolver resonates strongly with a large number of readers. Most are very positive, but a few of you really dislike this BB pistol. Their biggest complaint is that it costs too much for a BB pistol.

I say, if you feel that way, just don’t buy it. The airsoft companies who are making these realistic replicas are coming from their world of 6mm plastic balls, and 4.3mm steel BBs are a lot easier to make than rifled BB guns. Some people think the only difference is a rifled barrel, but they overlook the hundreds of thousands of dollars that must be invested plus the time learning to make rifled barrels by the tens of thousands. Sure, anybody who is competent can rifle 10 or even 50 barrels a month, but these companies need barrels in far larger numbers, and that’s not only an investment in production capability, but also in expertise. Just ask Crosman about learning to rifle accurate PCP barrels. It took them years to make the transition, and they still buy barrels for several of their guns.

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Hornady Black Diamond BBs: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Hornady Black Diamond steel BBs
• Size
• Velocity
• Daisy 499 BB gun
• Daisy 880 BB gun

Today I want to introduce you to a new BB that’s just come to market — Hornady Black Diamond steel BBs.

Hornady Black Diamond steel BBs
Hornady is an ammunition and bullet maker; so, when they came out with their Black Diamond BB, I had to test it. I already use several of their bullets in my firearms, and I know they’re a premium brand. The Black Diamond is a steel BB, so it will work in guns that use magnets to control the BBs. These days, a lot of them do use magnets.

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Umarex NXG APX multi-pump air rifle kit: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Umarex NXG APX rifle
Umarex NXG APX multi-pump air rifle.

This report covers:

• Sight-in
• Accuracy, starting with Premier lite pellets
• On to RWS Superdome pellets
• What to do?
• Anything else?
• Summary

It’s been a long time since I looked at the Umrarex NXG APX air rifle kit. The last part was published on October 3, and it was an accuracy test at 10 meters with open sights. The next test was supposed to be shot at 25 yards with the scoped rifle, and that is what I’ll do today, but there was a problem.

Try though I did, I couldn’t find a scope mount that fit the top rail of the rifle! Without that, there’s no way of mounting a scope, and there goes the test.

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