The Cody Thunderbird revolver: The face of innovation

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• History
• Design
• Innovation
• Sights
• Disassembly
• Safety
• Flaws
• Summary

Thunderbird revolver
The Cody Thunderbird revolver was produced at the end of the 1950s.

Want a look behind the scenes at what it’s like to write a blog? Yesterday, for example, I was about to test the Webley Rebel for accuracy, when everything fell apart. I will explain what happened when I do the report on the Rebel, but suffice to say I wasted 90 minutes fiddling around and getting nowhere.

That’s when I punt. I’d been wanting to cover the Cody Thunderbird revolver for a long time, so here it goes!

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The American Boy Scout Remington rifle

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

American Boy Scout rifle
American Boy Scout rifle.

This report covers:

• History of the American Boy Scouts
• Remington rifle chosen
• Why a bayonet?
• Features of the rifle
• How it shoots
• How was the rifle used?
• Pyramyd Air Cup

And now for something entirely different, yet surprisingly similar.

History of the American Boy Scouts
In 1907, Lieutenant General Baden-Powell held the Brownsea Island scout camp, which is considered the start of the Boy Scouts. In February 8, 1910, American publisher W.D. Boyce founded the Boy Scouts of America, inspired by and based on the British Boy Scouts and with the blessing of Baden-Powell. The organization has grown to be a large and successful one that has touched the lives of many men in the United States.

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Hakim air rifle: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

Hakim
Hakim is a large, heavy military trainer made in the 1950s by Anschütz.

This report covers:

• Bone-dry
• Synthetic piston seal
• Piston lube
• Mainspring lube
• Assembly
• Trigger adjustment
• Test-fire
• Eley Wasp pellets before
• Eley Wasp pellets after
• RWS Superpoint pellets before
• RWS Superpoint pellets after
• RWS Hobby pellets before
• RWS Hobby pellets after
• Evaluation

This has been a detailed look at a rare Hakim air rifle trainer that was made for the Egyptian army in 1954 by the German firm of Anschütz. In Part 6, I showed a detailed disassembly of the rifle that included solving a problem with a sticky screw. Today, I tell you how I lubricated the rifle’s action and how it performs after the lubrication.

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Hakim air rifle: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord, the Godfather of Airguns™
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

Hakim
Hakim is a large, heavy military trainer made in the 1950s by Anschütz.

This report covers:

• A very complex air rifle
• Let’s get to it — removing the stock
• Barreled action out
• Trouble!
• Call Otho!
• What was wrong?
• Wow — that’s a lot of work!
• What I found

Today, we’ll take apart the Hakim air rifle and see exactly how this rifle is put together. As you’ll remember or gather from reading the past posts, this Hakim is in very good condition, but it’s also very buzzy when it fires. I wanted to find out why that is and to correct it if I can.

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Ft. Worth airgun show: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, The Godfather of Airguns™
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

• Other dealers
• Rossi FAL trainer
• Other rare things
ª On the range
• Things I missed
• Something that found me

Back to the show report today. I was not expecting the level of interest the first report got, so I left out a lot of things. Today, I’ll rectify that.

Other dealers
In the first report I focused on the major dealers, but a show like this cannot prosper unless some of the key smaller dealers attend. Let’s start with Dennis Quackenbush. I know Dennis was busy all day, even though I scarcely got a chance to visit with him, because his table faced mine. Whenever I looked over, he had one or two people talking to him — and they wanted to buy guns! Dennis doesn’t usually have a lot of guns to sell at a show, because he builds to order; but he does bring a couple, and people were hounding him about them this time.

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Ft. Worth Airgun Show: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, The Godfather of Airguns™
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• How big was it?
• Larry Hanusch exhibit
• My display
• Door prizes and raffles
• More to come

The Ft. Worth airgun show was held last Saturday. In my opinion and in the opinion of the club that put it on, the show was very successful. Of course, we’re biased, but I think the public was also impressed. At least, that’s what they were telling me all day.

How big was it?
There were 60 tables at this show. They filled the hall we were in. We had a second hall we could have also used, but it wasn’t necessary this time. Dealers set up from 6:30 to 9 a.m., and the public started coming in right at 9. We had a couple early buyers who paid the equivalent of a table fee to see what was in the show before the doors were finally opened. More than 400 people attended (including the dealers).

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Buy the book!

by Tom Gaylord, The Godfather of Airguns™
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Problem — solved!
• Identify this airgun
• This blog can be a resource
• What happens when it isn’t in a book?

This report is a recurring theme with me. I see a person who needs information about an airgun, yet they have no library in which to research. This I cannot understand.

Last Thursday, the person needing info was me. I was out at the range shooting my AR-15, which, despite my feelings to the contrary, is the most accurate rifle I own — and perhaps have ever owned! Those who have followed my writings know I am not a fan of the AR design. I won’t get into that now, for this isn’t about them. But my dislike of the rifle has put me in the position of knowing very little about the gun — in spite of “owning” more than 100 of them in an arms room when I was a company commander in Germany in the 1970s.

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