2016 Texas Airgun show: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Weather
  • Started late?
  • Flash flood of people!
  • What kind of show was it?
  • Some finds
  • The gate

Here we go! The 2016 Texas Airgun Show was the most different airgun show I have ever attended. I will try to tell you why, but as I do, you will learn that I did not see the entire show, so I’ll rely on the comments of others to assist me.

Weather

The weather was perfect! Normally Texas is above 100 degrees at this time in August, but this day was just 91. And the humidity was down, as well. Rain had been predicted earlier in the week, but the sun was out most of the day and I don’t think a drop fell.

Started late?

Every airgun show I have attended, which is over 40 by now, has had the dealers lined up at the door, pressing to get in even before it’s time. This Texas show was not like that. In fact, at 7 a.m., half an hour after the doors were opened for the dealers to set up, there were still only about one-third of the tables filled. I thought something was up. A few people said the show was hard to locate, but that was because they were using Google Maps to find it. If they switched to Map Quest, the directions were perfect.

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Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Quackenbush Number 7
Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • 4.4mm lead balls
  • 4.55mm balls
  • Final comment on the trigger
  • The end

Today we test the accuracy of the Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun. I’m not expecting much from this gun, based on its light construction and age. But it surprised me in the velocity test we ran last Friday, so maybe I will be surprised yet again. I know you want a report of the 2016 Texas Airgun Show, and I will get to that tomorrow, so sit back and enjoy this oldie with me today.

The test

I shot the gun at 5 meters, using the UTG monopod as a rest. I shot from the seated position, so the gun was about as steady as it could be. However, as light as it is (2 lbs. 9.25 oz) and with an almost 9 lb. trigger pull, it is going to be a challenge to get off a shot without some movement of the gun. It’s probably much easier to shoot it offhand, though nowhere near as accurate.

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Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Quackenbush Number 7
Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • What is it?
  • Quackenbush airguns
  • No such luck!
  • Smart Shot
  • Some facts about the Number 7
  • Adjustable trigger!
  • Push-barrel
  • Sights
  • Summary

What is it?

What in the world is a Quackenbush Number 7 airgun? Well, for starters we aren’t talking about anything made by Dennis Quackenbush. No, we are looking at an airgun made by a distant cousin of his, Henry Marcus Quackenbush, of Herkimer, New York. He worked for the Remington Arms Company as his first job out of school, and, in 1871, started his own company under his name.

H. M. Quackenbush was a bright and gifted man who is credited with the invention of the nutcracker in 1878. The company he founded still exists under the name HMQ Metal Finishing Group and I believe are still in business today in Syracuse, NY. Look in your kitchen for those initials on your nutcracker.

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Sheridan Blue Streak: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Sheridan Blue Streak
My Sheridan Blue Streak was purchased new in 1978.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • What about a Steroid?
  • Today’s test
  • Test 1
  • Test 2
  • Test 3
  • Trigger pull
  • Evaluation

Today we will look at the power of my vintage Sheridan Blue Streak. I bought this multi pump pneumatic new in 1978 and it has never had any maintenance. All I have done is faithfully oil the pump piston head with Crosman Pellgunoil when it needed it (at least every 6 months if you shoot it regularly, but every time if you only shoot it occasionally like me) and I always stored the gun with a pump of air in it. In the past 6-8 years I’ve upped that to 2 pumps of air.

What about a Steroid?

Always when I talk about a Sheridan, the topic of the Steroid Streak comes up. Why haven’t I had my rifle upgraded by Tim McMurray? Well, the readers of The Airgun Letter know that I did own a Steroid Streak. It was a Silver Streak I bought new and sent to Tim to convert. Yes, it was more powerful, but I decided after testing it that I didn’t need the extra power. What my old Blue Streak could do on its factory trim is good enough for me.

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Teach me to shoot: Part 13

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10
Part 11
Part 12

This is the continuing fictional saga and guest report of a man teaching a woman to shoot. Today Jack will start teaching Jamell, how to shoot a muzzle loading rifle.

Our guest writer is reader, Jack Cooper. Take it away, Jack.

Teach me to shoot

by Jack Cooper

This report covers:

  • A fowler?
  • Jamell Fowler
  • A refresher
  • Flintlock basics
  • Description
  • Loading sequence
  • Speaking of ramming
  • Priming sequence
  • Flash in the pan
  • Wet weather
  • Next

DANGER: Today’s topic talks about loading and shooting a black powder firearm. Black powder is explosive, even in the open. Be sure you know what you are doing before using black powder!

I went with Jamell to pick up the custom flintlock she ordered. It was part of a trade for one of her sculptures, and she took pictures of the clay rendering she had made to show to the gun maker. He was thrilled with her work, which will be an 18-inch bronze of a mountain man facing a grizzly bear. Apparently he will owe her some money plus the gun, but I stayed out of their business.

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Daisy’s Red Ryder: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

Daisy Red Ryder
Daisy Red Ryder.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Daisy BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • H&N Smart Shot BBs
  • Baseline

Today we look at the accuracy of my vintage Daisy Red Ryder BB gun. I shot the gun with open sights today, to baseline it for the next test, which will be with an optical sight mounted.

The test

I shot the BB gun off a UTG monopod rest at 5 meters. I was seated while doing this. I used a 6 o’clock hold — resting the black bull on top of the front sight that was level with the top of the rear sight. The first BB tested was the Daisy Premium Grade BB.

Daisy BBs

You would expect Daisy BBs to do well in a BB gun made by them. Of course more than a half century separates their dates of manufacture, but today’s BBs are far superior to the ones of the gun’s period.

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Schofield Number 3 BB revolver: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Schofield BB revolver
Schofield BB revolver.

This report covers:

  • A new toy
  • Fatal flaw
  • Single action
  • Safety
  • Cartridge
  • The BB gun
  • Manual needs some work
  • Cartridges
  • Sights
  • Schofield is a rare firearm!
  • Cool!

A new toy

Oh, boy! Here we go again with another lookalike BB revolver. This Schofield BB gun is from the past. It’s a replica of S&W’s Schofield revolver. The Schofield was created from a Smith & Wesson New Model Number 3 revolver (often also called the American, to differentiate it from the Russian model) by Major George W. Schofield of the 10th cavalry. The major modification involved moving the barrel latch of this top-break revolver from the barrel to the frame of the gun, allowing the barrel to be broken open with one hand. Cavalry troops have to control horses, along with all their other duties as soldiers, so they want everything they use — guns, sabers, etc. — to work one-handed.

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