Air Venturi Rockin’ Rat target: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Rockin' Rat
Rockin’ Rat.

This report covers:

  • Knocked down
  • Together in 3 minutes!
  • Instructions
  • Three minutes and done!
  • Now what?
  • Directions
  • Why the Rockin’ Rat?

Say hello to my little friend! I saw the Air Venturi Rockin’Rat target at the 2016 Pyramyd Air Cup and asked to have one sent for evaluation. This is the kind of product I would like to write about more, but how can I make a story out of it? This one looks so interesting that I’m going to try.

Knocked down

The target comes knocked down in a lithographed box. As a man, those words “some assembly required” started screaming in my head. That’s what took the fun out of many Christmas mornings for me when my family was young. Everybody else was passed out from their sugar comas, listening to carols, while I looked at sheets of papertelling me to “press tab A into flange B”. My most memorable moment was when I bought a youth bicycle wrapped in plastic shrink wrap, and all I had to do was straighten the handlebars and tighten one nut. Hurrah!

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Why can’t I shoot better ?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Why can’t I shoot better?
  • B-I-L speaks
  • Plateaus
  • What could make me advance?
  • Better equipment?
  • The end

This is a question I am asked from time to time. Why can’t I shoot better? Recently several readers asked the question and my brother-in-law, Bob, asked it privately. I told everyone I would address this issue, and today is the day.

Why can’t I shoot better?

This is a question that’s not unlike the one we all asked as children, namely “ Why can’t I grow any taller?” Of course today you recognize that you were growing all the time, but the progress was so slow it was impossible to see. Someone, probably your mom, may have marked your height from time to time with a pencil mark on the woodwork of a door frame. As a kid you didn’t think too much about that process, but as time passed you had to admit the marks kept going up.

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2016 Pyramyd Air Cup: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • The matches
  • Field target
  • Strange airgun
  • Fun guns
  • Air Bolt
  • Rockin’ rat target
  • The end

The matches

Let’s get right to it. The Pyramyd Air Cup is a series of airgun matches, with field target being the premiere sport, followed by the Pyramyd Gunslynger and then the Pay Day Challenge. The Pay Day Challenge is first and the $200 prize gets everyone in the mood for competing. It’s a total of 10 shots at field targets with sighted-in rifles provided by Pyramyd Air. Five shots are at 40 yards off a benchrest with an HW S100 PCP rifle. Then 3 shots offhand at 25 yards with an Air Arms S200 FT, and finally 2 shots offhand at 15 yards with a Condor. All targets have 1.5-inch kill zones.

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2016 Pyramyd Air Cup: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • You don’t have to compete
  • My eye
  • Bubble level!
  • New Bug Buster
  • Speaking of scopes…
  • Fun stuff
  • More to come!

I attended all three days of the 2016 Pyramyd Air Cup last weekend and got to meet a number of blog readers from around the nation. Oddly, some of the readers who live only a few hours away from New Philadelphia, Ohio, did not make the trip. That surprised me. I don’t think they realized all the advantages of attending.

You don’t have to compete

You can attend the event without shooting in any of the events. In fact, a lot of people might like to do that even more, because while most of the crowd is on one of the courses, you get to monopolize the time of the vendors and look at everything they brought to display and sell. Just a for instance — Pyramyd Air brought out some guns that were in their back room — guns like an older Beeman Webley Tempest pistol. The people not shooting in the Cup had the chance to buy these things, and many of them did.

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2016 Texas Airgun show: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • It was a great show!
  • Some of the guns I saw at the show
  • Seriously though
  • Not for sale
  • Demonstrations
  • Air Bolt
  • Robin Hood
  • An interesting find
  • Will there be another show?

It was a great show!

I sold more airguns at this show than at any other I have attended. Besides that I met a lot of readers who came up and shook my hand. That is so nice, because it tells me who I’m reaching.

I had my latest book for sale on the table and it looks like I sold about 20 of them. I wanted to have coffee cups, hats and tee-shirts, but I’m updating my Godfather logo so it will be right when I sell them. Next year for sure.

The bottom line was — I had a great show! So did every dealer I talked to. Larry Hannusch told me he sold more guns than he normally does and Sun Optics actually sold out of several items. I know AirForce Airguns was doing a brisk business on the tables behind me, and Dennis Quackenbush, who usually only brings guns for people who have ordered them actually had guns for sale this time! He told me after the show he sold several of them.

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How to range-find with an adjustable parallax scope

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Why know the range?
  • First point
  • Focus — not rangefinding
  • Limitations
  • Temperature
  • What scale is on the adjustment?
  • Sidewheels
  • Scope magnification
  • The average airgunner
  • Do you need a range finding scope?

I’m writing this report for a new reader — Ovid. As soon as I replied to his request last week, another reader said he wanted to know how it worked, too, which tells me there are couple thousand silent readers with the same question. So, let’s learn how to determine ranges with a parallax adjusting scope.

Why know the range?

Airgunners need to know the range to the target because of the arched trajectory their pellets follow. Where centerfire cartridges may drop 9 inches over a distance of 250 yards, an airgun can do the same thing in 60 yards. And some competitions like field target demand that the pellet pass through a small hole without touching the sides of the hole, or the target will lock up and not fall. So, we are not talking inches — we are talking fractions of an inch! Therefore, knowing the trajectory of the one pellet you shoot at all distances and knowing the precise distance to your target is critical.

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2016 Texas Airgun show: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Weather
  • Started late?
  • Flash flood of people!
  • What kind of show was it?
  • Some finds
  • The gate

Here we go! The 2016 Texas Airgun Show was the most different airgun show I have ever attended. I will try to tell you why, but as I do, you will learn that I did not see the entire show, so I’ll rely on the comments of others to assist me.

Weather

The weather was perfect! Normally Texas is above 100 degrees at this time in August, but this day was just 91. And the humidity was down, as well. Rain had been predicted earlier in the week, but the sun was out most of the day and I don’t think a drop fell.

Started late?

Every airgun show I have attended, which is over 40 by now, has had the dealers lined up at the door, pressing to get in even before it’s time. This Texas show was not like that. In fact, at 7 a.m., half an hour after the doors were opened for the dealers to set up, there were still only about one-third of the tables filled. I thought something was up. A few people said the show was hard to locate, but that was because they were using Google Maps to find it. If they switched to Map Quest, the directions were perfect.

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