They overstepped the line!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

This report covers:

  • What “they” did
  • Rocky Mountain Arms Corporation
  • Young minds go astray
  • Bad ideas abound!
  • Percussion cap guns
  • What about cartridge primers?
  • Summary

What “they” did

The history of airguns is fascinating to those who enjoy applied creativity. But sometimes when creativity is carried too far it becomes a liability. And that’s the case with today’s guns.

Rocky Mountain Arms Corporation

In the 1970s the Rocky Mountain Arms Corporation (RMAC) created a little gun for kids who wanted to shoot with their fathers. They referred to it as a .22 caliber, though it shot a number 4 buckshot that is really 0.24 inches rather than 0.223 inches in diameter. That didn’t matter because a 5-pound bag number 4 buckshot was available for a few dollars. For that you got thousands of shots.  Nobody worried about the size of the ball that much.

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Generation 2 .25 caliber Benjamin Marauder: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Marauder air rifle Gen 2
Second-generation Benjamin Marauder in a synthetic stock.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • Not the normal test
  • Trigger adjusted again
  • The goal
  • Velocity test — JSB Exact Kings
  • Early hiccup!
  • Striker adjustment 1
  • Striker adjustment 2
  • Change of plans
  • The rifle’s performance with this adjustment

This is a continuation of the test I’m running on the .25-caliber gen 2 Benjamin Marauder. So far I have evaluated the rifle as it came from the box, adjusted the trigger, installed the exciting new UTG 2-16X44AO Accushot scope and UTG rubber armored folding metal bipod, sighted the rifle in at 25 yards and installed the RAI modular stock and folding butt extension. Then I went to the 50-yard range — twice — and shot the rifle for accuracy. That was where I discovered that the .25-caliber JSB Exact Kings are the best pellets for this rifle. And the .25-caliber Benjamin domes that have no brand name are a close second.

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FWB 300/150 disassembly instructions: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Today’s report contains special instructions for the disassembly of a Feinwerkbau 150 air rifle — for those few places where it departs from the FWB 300 instructions presented in Parts 1 and 2. It was translated and written for us by reader CptKlotz.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

Over to you, CptKlotz.

This report covers:

  • Additional information for disassembling FWB 150 rifles
    Trigger blade
    Ratchet unit
    Powerplant disassembly — potential danger!
    Procedure

This article was originally published on the German co2air forums (www.co2air.de). It was created by the users Pellet (original text guide), Paramags (additional information and FWB150 details ) and boerni (photos and forum post). They kindly gave me permission to translate their guide so people who can’t read German can use it as well. The original forum post can be found here.

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FWB 300 disassembly instructions: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

FWB 300 disassembly instructions: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report describes how to disassembly a Feinwerkbau 300 air rifle. It was written for us by reader CptKlotz, our interpid German airgunner. We are breaking it into 2 parts because of the large number of photos.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

Over to you, CptKlotz.

This report covers:

Introduction
Our thanks

Today’s report is the continuation and completion of how to disassembly a Feinwerkbau 300 air rifle. It was written for us by reader CptKlotz. Once again, do not attempt this unless you are sure you understand the instructions and can perform all of them safely!

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FWB 300 disassembly instructions: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is a translation that describes how to disassemble a Feinwerkbau 300 air rifle. It was written for us by reader Stephan Szlosze, who we know as CptKlotz, our intrepid German airgunner. We are breaking this into 3 parts because of the large number of photos.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

Before I turn this over, I want to emphasize that disassembly of an airgun is both dangerous to the person doing the work as well as to the rifle. Do not undertake this project unless you have read and understood all the instructions.

Over to you, CptKlotz.

This report covers:

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What do you do when…?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Scopes move ALL the time
  • The secret to scope movement
  • Scopes move for other reasons
  • The secret to parallax elimination
  • The secret to parallax elimination
  • Open sights are rarely sighted-in
  • The secret to hitting what you shoot at
  • Magazine feeding problems
  • Making bad triggers good
  • Live with it

Today I’m going to talk about some things that never come up as full topics, but do get discussed peripherally a lot! I’m referring to the little things you encounter at the shooting range — the quirks that all guns, both firearms and airguns, bring to the table.

Scopes move ALL the time

I was at the range a couple weeks ago with Bob, my brother-in-law. We were sighting-in his AR-15 and also shooting a Mauser that Otho had. Bob mentioned once that even though he was shooting from a rest, he could never get Otho’s scope to stop moving.

Hollywood has taught the non-shooting public that images seen through rifle scopes are completely still and in sharp focus. Shooters know different. No matter who you are the image in the scope will always move. Just your heartbeat is enough to make it move, though people don’t appreciate that until they become shooters. It’s one reason some people prefer iron sights. The image still moves with them, but you can’t detect it nearly as easily.

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Testing a Diana model 23 breakbarrel air rifle: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

Diana model 23 air rifle Diana 23 was a find on Gun Broker. The finish is bad but the gun works well.

This report covers:

  • An update
  • Step 1
  • Rust
  • Step 2: To buff or not?
  • Pits
  • Steel wool
  • I’m not done prepping
  • Cold blue

Many of you are interested in working on vintage airguns. To this point, I’ve shown you how to tune several spring-piston guns and I’ve touched on the subject of cold bluing, but I have not discussed it in detail. This series will go into the refinishing of the metal parts of a springer, including how to apply a deep cold blue that lasts.

An update

The last time we looked at this Diana model 23 breakbarrel, I’d disassembled it and shown you all the bad spots. I said then my plan was to refinish the rifle. Today, we begin by cleaning the parts. I’m only showing the spring tube, but all the steel parts are treated in the same way.

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