Beeman R8: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Rail Lock Compressor R8

The Beeman R8 looks like a baby R1.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • New mainspring
  • The compression chamber honing
  • The Rail Lock Compressor
  • Cleaning
  • Piston seal
  • Installed the new seal and mainspring
  • Back in the stock
  • Cocking effort
  • RWS Hobbys
  • RWS Superdomes
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Firing behavior
  • Conclusions so far

The new mainspring and piston seal Pyramyd Air sent for my R8 arrived and I installed them last Thursday. This will document how that installation went and look at the velocity results, plus the powerplant smoothness.

New mainspring

The new mainspring is made from better wire than the stock Weihrauch spring. Gene Salvino has reports of guns with up to 9,000 shots with this spring that have lost little velocity, if any, since installation.

I knew there would be a lot of interest in this mainspring, so I examined it carefully and also photographed it next to the existing spring. The new spring wire is silver colored, where the Weihrauch spring wire is a darker color. The new spring appears to be about one inch longer than the original, but I don’t think it has been scragged.

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Shimming a Diana breech seal

Introduction by B.B. Pelletier

Thanks for all the kind wishes on my eye surgery. It went very well and my exam the next day (yesterday) showed the potential for 20/20 in that eye.

Once again I am running a “Best of BB” because I still could not see the computer screen well enough to write a new report. I saw the doctor yesterday and got the patch off my eye, so hopefully this will be the last time I have to do this.

With all the interest in tuning spring guns I thought you might like to see what effect a new breech seal has on performance. I plan on giving the Beeman R8 a new seal after I get its velocity up higher than it is now. Let’s look at this old report on what a fresh breech seal can do.

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Beeman R8: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Rail Lock Compressor R8

The Beeman R8 looks like a baby R1.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Clean and inspect
  • Little wear
  • Install the Rail Lock mainspring compressor
  • Now what?
  • Tip
  • When to take off the compressor
  • Finish threading the end cap
  • The trigger
  • It’s been modified!
  • Installing the trigger
  • Trigger tip
  • How does it feel?
  • RWS Hobbys
  • RWS Superdomes
  • JSB Exact RS
  • What happened?

Today I finish inspecting and cleaning the Beeman R8. I will then assemble it, lubricate it and test it with the same pellets I used before, so we can compare.

Clean and inspect

As I cleaned all the grease off the parts I inspected each of them. The piston and spring guide have not been altered. The mainspring is straight (test it by rolling on a flat surface) and fits the piston and spring guide reasonably well. There is some tolerance between the spring and both those parts, and if I were doing a top grade tune I would make a new spring guide, plus I would either shim the inside of the piston or find a mainspring that fits it closer. I’m not doing that today.

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Beeman R8: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Rail Lock Compressor R8

The Beeman R8 looks like a baby R1.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Disassembly begins
  • Remove trigger
  • Unscrew end cap
  • Some words about the Rail Lock compressor
  • Grease everywhere!
  • Remove piston
  • Cleanup
  • Best grease
  • Next
  • Summary

Disassembly begins

Today I take the Beeman R8 apart and we see what’s inside. First the barreled action comes out of the stock. When it does I can show you the articulated cocking link and the part that keeps that link under control.

R8 cocking link
Here is the cocking link. It passes through that bridge that keeps it aligned, and the spring on the right keeps the long link away from the stock. It quiets the linkage.

Remove trigger

With the action free, the trigger is removed from the end cap by pushing out two pins that hold it. The safety and safety spring will also come free.

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Air Venturi Rail Lock spring compressor: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Rail Lock Compressor
The Air Venturil Rail Lock spring compressor is compact.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Attaches to scope rail
  • Enter the R8!
  • R8 out of the stock
  • Remove the Rekord trigger
  • Unscrew the end cap
  • Install the mainspring compressor
  • Removing the end cap
  • One last photo
  • Assembly
  • Evaluation so far

Today I start testing the new Air Venturi Rail Lock spring compressor. Many of you have expressed an interest in this tool, and I want to test it as broadly as possible, because all airguns are not made the same.

Attaches to scope rail

This compressor attaches to the scope rail on your airgun. It will work on both pistols and rifles — as long as there is a scope rail to attach to. It attaches to both 11mm dovetails and Weaver/Picatinney dovetails. The rails have to be close enough to the rear of the spring tube to allow the compressor to work, but that will become clear when you see the pictures.

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DIY spinner targets

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This is a guest blog from reader Vana-2, who goes by the name Hank. He tells us how to make spinner targets.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Now over to you, Hank.

DIY Spinner Targets
Hank Vana2

This report covers:

  • Spinners for plinking
  • Construction
  • Form the spinner arm
  • Form the pivot coil
  • Assembly
  • The target base
  • Spinner mounting
  • Cautions
  • Spinner target use
  • Summary

spinner
I like to make my own spinner targets.

Spinners for plinking

Plinking small reactive targets at random ranges is my favorite airgun passtime and spinners are my preferred targets. Today I will share how I make them.

I like spinners because they are an all-or-nothing kind of target. Hit them and they spin. Miss and they just sit there, waiting for you to try again. The instant feedback of a hit confirms that the sight picture was correct for that range. The way they move when hit allows you to discern whether you just clipped the spinner or smacked it dead center. Excellent training for hunting!

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Odds and ends

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Blue Book of Airguns
  • Some recent acquisitions
  • Findlay airgun show
  • Texas airgun show
  • Pyramyd Air Cup
  • Student Air Rifle (SAR) program

Today I thought I would clean up some things and tell you about some exciting things that have been happening.

Blue Book of Airguns

First I’ll tell you about the new Blue Book of Airguns. It’s the 12th edition and contains 736 pages. No, it doesn’t have all the airguns in the world, and it never will. No publication will ever be able to do that. But this is the most comprehensive book about airguns that exists, and if you want to play in the airgun world, you really need one.

Many of you ask me how I know so much about airguns. The Blue Book is one of the reasons. Without it I would not be the Godfather of Airguns. Perhaps the favorite cousin, but definitely not the Godfather.

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