Wax on — wax off!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Some basic truths
  • What am I saying?
  • What many do wrong
  • Ready, fire, aim!
  • Back to airgunners
  • Use the sights!
  • The end

Homework assignment. You need to watch the movie, “Karate Kid.” The moral of the movie is to slow down, concentrate and focus power! At least that’s what Mr. Miyagi tells Daniel-san.

Another phrase from WWII is, “Straighten up and fly right.” It pretty much means the same thing.

I almost titled this report, “Why I shoot muzzle loaders,” but I thought that would turn off the very people I was reaching out to today.

Some basic truths

1. When shooting lead bullets in a big borte airgun, always size the bullet at least one-thousandth of an inch larger than the bore. This is the principal reason 9mm big bore airguns are not accurate when shot with 9mm bullets (0.356-inches) but tighten right up when shot with 0.357-inch and even 0.358-inch bullets.

read more


Plan B

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

  • DB Cooper
  • What does this mean to you?
  • Range bags
  • How to spot a newbie
  • Riddle
  • The moral

I started writing today’s blog at 6 am, and three hours into the test I encountered a drop-dead fault with the rifle — something that has to be repaired. So, the test had to end and I was already well into my work day. What to do?

I’ll tell you about the problem when I finally do the review. Today I want to talk about having backup plans.

DB Cooper

When DB Cooper hijacked the airplane and bailed out over southern Washington state, he must have known the FBI would fool with the four parachutes they supplied him. My squadron of the 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment (over a thousand men), spent a month searching the probable impact site with the FBI. The airplane’s flight recorder told us when he left the plane (time, altitude and airspeed) and the weather data for that evening told us the trajectory. We searched for a small crater in the steep mountains and discovered very little of him. If he did crater, it wasn’t inside the search area. We did find the remains of another possible homicide, though, so it wasn’t a complete waste of time.

read more


Some talk about airgun lubrication: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Why do we lubricate?
  • The Meteor’s needs for lubrication
  • Leather piston seals
  • Velocity
  • Watch the performance
  • Synthetic piston seals
  • Summary
  • Other lubrication requirements

Yesterday a reader asked why I bothered with Tune in a Tube. Why didn’t I just clean the Meteor Mark I when I had it apart, lubricate with moly grease and be done with it? That tells me there are a number of readers who don’t really understand what is involved with airgun lubrication. So today I thought I would discuss it a little.

Why do we lubricate?

This is a good place to start. In fact, from the reader’s comments, it seems to be at the core of misunderstanding. Don’t we just lubricate to reduce friction?

Friction is a principal reason for lubrication. But there is more to it than that. Sometimes we want to reduce friction by a certain amount, while retaining some part of it that’s needed for proper operation. Otherwise, moly (molybdenum disulphide) would be the answer to everything. Some airgunners think it is. The reader who wrote the comment that got me started on today’s topic said that very thing — that I should just clean the Meteor’s parts and lube everything with moly and be done with it.

read more


BSA Meteor Mark I: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSA Meteor
BSA Meteor Mark I.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Applying Tune in a Tube
  • Not greasing a tractor
  • Well?
  • The test
  • Hobbys
  • RWS Superpoints
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Shut my mouth!
  • Next

Today we find out whether Tune in a Tube works on my BSA Meteor Mark I. Before we get into that, though I want to say a couple more things about the rifle. Reader RidgeRunner asked if the detent has a groove cut into it for the pivot pin. Yes, it does. And the trigger of this Mark I is significantly different than the trigger on my Mark IV Super Meteor that I showed you.

I plan to photograph both items in the report when I clean and re-tune the rifle, just so we have a good record, because this trigger is not that simple to assemble. Or perhaps it is simple, but it only goes together one way, which is not completely obvious. So I will document that in the next report.

read more


BSA Meteor Mark I: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSA Meteor
BSA Meteor Mark I.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Tune in a Tube
  • Baseline the Meteor
  • A second tune?
  • Disassembly
  • The compressor
  • What did I find?
  • The rest of the powerplant
  • Offset transfer port
  • The pivot point
  • What’s next?

Ho ho, hi ho; inside the gun we go! Today’s report brings a lot of topics together on one stage.

Tune in a Tube

One reason I’m doing this is because reader RidgeRunner has been touting Tune in a Tube — or at least I think he’s one. This is getting confusing, so please bear with me. Tune in a Tube is a tube of viscous grease that comes in an applicator that makes it easy to squirt the grease into the spring gun powerplant. It’s a type of lube tune that is simple and supposewd to be very easy to do. I want to find out if it’s a product that does what it says, because if it is there are quite a few spring guns that could benefit from it.

read more


Mainspring compressor

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

mainspring compressor
Mainspring compressor.

This report covers:

  • Can you make a mainspring compressor?
  • BSA Meteor
  • Description
  • Bridge
  • Headstock
  • Tailstock
  • Legs
  • General

Today I’m going to show you a mainspring compressor that I will use in tomorrow’s blog. I was asked this week by a new reader to show the tools needed to safely disassemble a spring-piston airgun. Here is the request.

Sir,
Great web sight!  As a “newbee” to air rifles, I find it a wealth of info!  Having a hard time trying to start a new post in the blog forum..  Specifically, I’m looking to find out if anyone makes proper tools for the correct disassembly of the Benjamin Trail NP XL 1500.. Looking for a proper end cap removal tool, and a spring compressor.  I was an armorer for years in LE, with an incredible amount of proper tools for “firearms”.  Just want to make sure that maybe there’s a place to purchase proper tools for air rifles out there.

read more


Webley Mark II Service: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service
Webley Mark II Service air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The problem
  • Trim the seal
  • Shim the old seal
  • Hole punch
  • Refit the old seal and shim
  • Does it work?

It’s been a while since we looked at the Mark II Service air rifle, asnd I thought it was time to take another look. You will recall in Part 2 I tested the velocity and found the rifle was shooting very slow. There was also a large puff of air at the breech that told me the breech seal needed to be replaced. I ordered one from the UK that took 3 weeks to arrive. When it got here I discovered it had to be sized to fit the breech. That has been shoving the report to the back burner, week after week, until I decided to do something about it.

read more