Checking out a Diana RWS 34P: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

Diana 34P
The Diana RWS 34P is a classic breakbarrel spring-piston air rifle.

This report covers:

  • Drooper
  • Sight in
  • The groups
  • One last time
  • Different pellets
  • RWS Superdomes
  • BKL adjustable scope mount
  • Summary

Today I scope Geo791’s Diana RWS 34P and shoot it for accuracy at 25 yards. We already know this rifle is accurate from the test with open sights. Today we discover how much it droops and whether enough correction is possible. Let’s start with the scope mount.

Drooper

I suspected this rifle was a drooper just because it’s a Diana 34. Most breakbarrels droop and all of the Diana 34s I have seen have had severe barrel droop. With some breakbarrels you can put shims under the rear of the scope to elevate it a little, but with this model shims usually don’t work — the droop is too great. If you used enough shims to raise it as high as it needs to go, you would damage the scope tube. So, I start out with a scope mount that’s made for a drooper. In this case I used the BKL 1-piece adjustable scope mount with 1-inch rings, because George has a scope with a one-inch tube. If this works I plan to send his rifle back to him with this mount installed, so all he has to do is mount his scope in the rings and sight in.

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Checking out a Diana RWS 34P: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Diana 34P
The Diana RWS 34P is a classic breakbarrel spring-piston air rifle.

This report covers:

  • How to tell if the mainspring is broken
  • Tight piston seal
  • JSB Exact RS domes
  • RWS Hobbys
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Where are we?
  • Did the rifle smooth out?
  • Cocking effort
  • What are the advantages?
  • The rest of the story

Today we look at the results of yesterday’s tune on Geo791’s .22 caliber Diana RWS 34P. I talked to Tom Gore, the owner of Vortek, and asked what kind of results I could expect from this kit. He said this one was designed to make the rifle perform at the factory spec, but with much longer spring life. When I told him how the rifle had tested before he said he felt it was right on spec already. I felt so, as well. And of course that was with a broken mainspring.

How to tell if the mainspring is broken

Several of you have asked me whether it’s possible to know when a Diana mainspring has broken and I said no. If just one end of the spring is broken the gun will shoot smoother than before and will have the same velocity. I think the broken piece winds itself into the new end of the mainspring (it always does) and helps dampen vibration. Unless you are observing the performance of your rifle very carefully and watching for this you’ll never see it.

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Checking out a Diana RWS 34P: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Diana 34P
The Diana RWS 34P is a classic breakbarrel spring-piston air rifle.

This report covers:

  • Happy birthday, America!
  • Vortek Pro Guide 2
  • Disassembly — Rail Lock Spring-Compressor
  • Spring break!
  • Removing the piston
  • Trouble
  • Lubrication
  • Assembly

Happy birthday, America!

Today the U.S. celebrates 241 years as a nation. It will be loud tonight (fireworks)!

Today I install the Vortek Pro Guide 2 tuneup kit in Geo791’s .22 caliber Diana RWS 34P. Now that we know his rifle is accurate it will be nice to also know that it shoots at the top of its form.

Vortek Pro Guide 2

Pyramyd Air doesn’t sell this kit, so if you want one you’ll have to get it direct from Vortek. The kit consists of instructions, a new mainspring, a special new spring guide, a synthetic top hat/forward spring guide, new piston seal, new breech seal and grease.

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How do you know…?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • August’s question
  • Experience
  • How do you tell…
  • Expected power
  • Piston stroke
  • Age of the gun
  • Chronograph or other means of power determination
  • How do you know? — case 1
  • Case 2
  • Last point
  • The last word

Today’s topic tries to address a question I am sure many newer airgunners have at some point. How do you know when a spring gun need repair? It was asked last week by reader August, who lives in Germany. Here is what he asked.

August’s question

”How do I recognize that an older gun piston seal is going bad? From reading the blog I gather that I can chrony it. But this gun delivered until right before the final breakdown. Only the last five shots it became slower. On opening the gun I saw that the outer part of the plastic seal was detached from the rest and had blocked the spring tube probably causing the older spring to break.

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How much polish…?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Is it worth the effort?
  • Ray Apelles
  • Sucked in
  • What was done
  • The point
  • Wasting time with the best of them
  • Time isn’t for sale
  • Get real
  • Treasure hunting

…to turn a sow’s ear into a silk purse?

Is it worth the effort?

Yesterday’s report inspired this one. In testing the BSA Meteor Mark I, I discovered more about myself than I did about the airgun. When that happens I pay attention, because you can never know too much about yourself.

I discovered that when all is said and done, I don’t like investing time and effort in something that was dredged up from the muck, just to prove a point. Because, what am I proving? That spending a lot of time and money can make any airgun a good one? Or, am I just proving that I am an eccentric?

This isn’t something I have known all along. I spent many years doing stupid things — chasing rainbows and unicorns. I guess we all have to do that to learn what matters in life.

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Beeman R8: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Rail Lock Compressor R8

The Beeman R8 looks like a baby R1.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • New mainspring
  • The compression chamber honing
  • The Rail Lock Compressor
  • Cleaning
  • Piston seal
  • Installed the new seal and mainspring
  • Back in the stock
  • Cocking effort
  • RWS Hobbys
  • RWS Superdomes
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Firing behavior
  • Conclusions so far

The new mainspring and piston seal Pyramyd Air sent for my R8 arrived and I installed them last Thursday. This will document how that installation went and look at the velocity results, plus the powerplant smoothness.

New mainspring

The new mainspring is made from better wire than the stock Weihrauch spring. Gene Salvino has reports of guns with up to 9,000 shots with this spring that have lost little velocity, if any, since installation.

I knew there would be a lot of interest in this mainspring, so I examined it carefully and also photographed it next to the existing spring. The new spring wire is silver colored, where the Weihrauch spring wire is a darker color. The new spring appears to be about one inch longer than the original, but I don’t think it has been scragged.

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Shimming a Diana breech seal

Introduction by B.B. Pelletier

Thanks for all the kind wishes on my eye surgery. It went very well and my exam the next day (yesterday) showed the potential for 20/20 in that eye.

Once again I am running a “Best of BB” because I still could not see the computer screen well enough to write a new report. I saw the doctor yesterday and got the patch off my eye, so hopefully this will be the last time I have to do this.

With all the interest in tuning spring guns I thought you might like to see what effect a new breech seal has on performance. I plan on giving the Beeman R8 a new seal after I get its velocity up higher than it is now. Let’s look at this old report on what a fresh breech seal can do.

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