2016 SHOT Show: Day 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Shot Show Media Day
Shot Show Day 1
Shot Show Day 2

This report covers:

  • Not just airguns
  • Galahad
  • RWS USA (Umarex USA)
  • Beautiful breakbarrel
  • Walther Maximathor and Rotek
  • Brodax
  • AirForce Airguns
  • Crosman
  • More to come

Not just airguns

SHOT is a trade show, but that’s not all. It’s also a place where old friends get to meet and chat at least one time each year. Some of these folks only see each other at SHOT. I was walking up an aisle on day three and someone called my name. Now, I have visual agnosia, which means I can’t recognize faces. I even couldn’t recognize my wife unless I knew what clothes she was wearing that day. Sounds funny, but it’s not when you live it.

So this tall gentleman calls my name and steps up to shake my hand like we were old friends. After I saw his nametag (thank the Lord for them!), I knew that we were. It was Wes Richardson — the guy who developed the Walther Dominator field target rifle with me back in the 1990s. He had been seriously ill and it showed, but he was upright and taking nutrition, as they say, so the news was good. Meeting old friends is a big part of attending the SHOT Show.

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2015 Texas airgun show: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Setup
  • Big bore draws a crowd
  • The match
  • Texans galore!
  • What about the show?
  • Vortek and the Diana 34
  • More to come

Setup

The Texas airgun show is a one-day event. Everyone knows they have to get in quick, set up quick and get everything accomplished in one short day. The Parker County Sportsman Club that hosted the event provided dozens of volunteers to run the ranges, park cars, sell tickets, prepare and serve food and drinks, and generally help anyone who needed it. As a result, the event was set up and running smooth when the doors opened to the public at 9 am. But, unlike last year, there was no line at the door. The tickets were sold at a gate outside the compound because we had vendors in two different buildings this year. Even so I was surprised and a little disappointed when I didn’t see the immediate crush of people at 9.

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Interesting gun designs — Benjamin Legacy: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Benjamin Legacy SE
Benjamin Legacy with a gas spring was a short-lived breakbarrel.

This report covers:

  • Getting started
  • The hold
  • First group
  • Second group
  • After that
  • Additional data
  • What’s next?

Let’s look at the accuracy of the .22-caliber Benjamin Legacy gas-spring rifle. If you remember, this was a rifle that came out just before I went into the hospital in 2010. When I got out 3 months later, the gun had already been taken off the market. I never reviewed it for you because it was an airgun you couldn’t buy, but the fact that it only took 16 lbs. of force to cock it fascinated me. I wanted to see what it could do regardless of whether or not you could buy one; because, if this turned out to be a good idea, it’s worth doing again.

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Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana N-TEC 340 Classic
Diana 340 N-TEC 340 air rifle

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Scoping a drooper
  • Firing cycle is smooth and quick
  • Trigger takes some learning
  • Artillery hold
  • First group
  • Second group
  • Third group
  • I was pleased!
  • Artillery hold abandoned — the fourth group
  • The bottom line

Boy, has this test turned out to be an eye opener! I had hoped that the Diana 340 N-TEC Classic would not disappoint, and believe me — it didn’t!

Scoping a drooper

Today, I’ll test the rifle scoped at 25 yards. I mounted an AirForce 4-16x scope in UTG Quick Lock Max Strength high Weaver rings; but this is a Diana air rifle, and that means the scope base on the rifle is proprietary. Knowing Diana’s reputation for drooper barrels, I also mounted a prototype UTG drooper scope base on the rifle. They aren’t supposed to fit, but this one did, perhaps because it’s a prototype and not the same as the bases they sell.

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Interesting gun designs — Benjamin Legacy: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Benjamin Legacy SE
Benjamin Legacy with a gas spring was a short-lived breakbarrel.

This report covers:

  • Something special from the back room!
  • Benefits of a lower-pressure gas spring
  • Trigger
  • Lower power
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Crosman Premier pellets
  • JSB Exact RS pellets
  • The point of this review

Something special from the back room!

I’m going slow with this report, because it concerns an airgun you cannot purchase. Read Part 2 to see where I found out about the .22-caliber Benjamin Legacy breakbarrel with a gas spring — not the Legacy with a steel spring that sold many years earlier. In the 3 months between the time I contracted pancreatitis in March of 2010 until I was discharged from the last hospital in June of that year, the Benjamin Legacy with gas spring was born, died and forgotten. I never had the chance to review it for you.

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Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana N-TEC 340 Classic
Diana N-TEC 340 Classic air rifle

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Baracuda Match pellets, 4.50mm head
  • Baracuda Match pellets, 4.53mm head
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Fast action
  • Learning the trigger
  • JSB Exact heavy pellets, 10.34 grains
  • The bottom line — so far

Let’s start looking at the accuracy of the Diana 340 N-TEC Classic rifle. I used the open sights that come on the rifle, and I shot at 10 meters today. I did that because air rifles with gas springs are, in my experience, not all that accurate. I did feel the 340 N-TEC is a different breed of gas-spring rifle, but I wanted to play it safe. So, 10 meters off a rest.

Baracuda Match pellets, 4.50mm head

The first pellet I shot was the H&N Baracuda with a 4.50mm head. It hit the target a little high and to the left; so, after shooting the group, I adjusted the sights.

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Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana N-TEC 340 Classic
Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Cocking effort
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • H&N Baracuda Match pellets, 4.50mm head
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Why the slow shots?
  • Trigger
  • Evaluation so far

Cocking effort

Today, we’ll look at the velocity of the Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle. I said in part 1 that cocking this rifle is a chore for 2 hands, but I’ve learned something about the gun in this test. The gas spring isn’t the only thing I’m fighting to cock the rifle. The barrel pivot joint is also a bit too tight. The cocking effort is about 35 lbs, which isn’t that bad, but the pivot joint boosts that up to 42 lbs. It made the rifle difficult to measure, but I soon learned to rapidly pull down the barrel and bypass the pivot joint tension. Then, it is a one-handed operation.

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