Buying and selling airguns on the internet: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

• The shyster dealers
• Weasel wording
• Bad photos
• How to spot an honest dealer
• Honest vs. dishonest: What’s the verdict?

The shyster dealers
Today, let’s start out talking about those internet dealers who are less than honest. I’m not talking about the scammers who are certainly out there. They’re the people with nothing at all to sell. All they want is for you to send them money, and you’ll never hear from them again.

I’m talking about the dealers who do anything to mislead you about the real airguns they’re selling. They have actual guns to sell, but they describe them in dishonest ways. I’ve dealt with a few and discovered a great many others, so this should be interesting. Remember, I’m primarily talking about buying guns on the Gun Broker website, though this does apply to most websites where selling takes place.

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Things you can do to make your new airgun better: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• The trigger
• Be careful!
• Adjustment is fine
• Lubrication
• The best thing you can do with a new airgun
• Final recommendation
• Summary

This report is written at the request of Jennifer Cooper Wylie, a follower on my Facebook page. A few days ago, she asked me to address this subject, and I thought it would make a wonderful report for all the people who are new to airguns.

This subject is large, so I’ve broken it into powerplants. Today, I’ll address spring-piston guns, only. So, when I say airgun today, I’m talking only about springers.

You have a new airgun. What can you do to make it better? Even if it isn’t brand new, you may be able to find a manual for your gun, and that’s where you should begin.

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Testing a Diana model 23 breakbarrel air rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Diana 23

Diana 23 was a find on Gun Broker. The finish is bad but the gun works well.

This report covers:

• An update
• Today — disassembly

An update
I started this report back in September 2013 — 16 months ago. I’d purchased a Diana model 23 breakbarrel rifle off the Gun Broker auction website for $30. With shipping, it came to $50. We discussed cruising Gun Broker for airgun deals yesterday, and this is one that I got.

This rifle is really a Winchester model 423, which is how Winchester had Diana mark all their air rifles (in the 400-series, with the Diana model number being the last 2 digits). Most Winchester air rifles are .22 caliber, but this one came as a .177, which is more appropriate to its small powerplant.

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Buying and selling airguns on the internet: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Tip 1: Commonly misspelled names
• Tip 2: Use an adjective
• Back to airguns
• Tip 3: What’s in a name?
• More

I’m going to address a question that several readers have asked about: How to buy used and vintage airguns over the internet. I’ve wanted to write this series for some time now. While I titled it “…on the internet,” a lot of what I’m going to say applies directly to Gun Broker — a large auction website. I use a tablet to browse this site anytime I am away from my desk and, shall we say, otherwise occupied? That time adds up for an old man!

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An update on airgun silencers

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Are they or aren’t they — legal?
• Some dealers don’t know or don’t care
• Mistakes can be made
• Intent is usually the key
• Your safety net
• Buzzwords that confuse
• Are they removable?
• Pyramyd Air promotion: Win a Red Ryder for Christmas!

Today’s report was specifically requested by Ruth Kass, a member of Pyramyd Air’s sales team. She recently talked to a customer who was very concerned about buying an airgun that might get him in trouble with the law because of a silencer issue. He read my article on airgun silencers, which put doubts in his mind about what’s legal and what isn’t. That article is still valid, but I thought I would leaven it today with some common sense.

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Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle: Part 8

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle
FWB Sport air rifle.

This report covers:

• Assembly
• Lubrication
• Testing the rifle
• Crosman Premier lite pellets
• Air Arms Falcon pellets
• Evaluation to this point

Today, I’ll finish the tune of the Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle, and then we’ll test it. When we ended the last report, we had looked at all the parts and cleaned off the excess gear oil.

Assembly
Now it’s time to assemble the rifle. I looked at the trigger assembly that receives and holds the piston rod when the rifle is cocked. It’s very similar to the 124 trigger, but I can see refinement in fit and finish. This won’t be an easy trigger to modify, but it’s so nice as it comes from the factory that this isn’t an issue. I did not lubricate the trigger before assembly, but I did dry off the gear oil.

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Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle
FWB Sport air rifle.

This report covers:

• Disassembling the Sport
• Spring guide was loose
• Remove the piston
• Piston comes out
• Mainspring tube/compression chamber finish

Okay, today the Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle comes apart, and we’ll start looking inside. This report is huge, so it will take today and tomorrow to complete.

Some of you might like to compare what you see in the Sport to the FWB 124. That can be seen in the 15-part report I did on the FWB 124.

Okay, enough explanation. This is what you’ve been waiting for, so let’s get to it!

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