Air Venturi Rail Lock spring compressor: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Rail Lock compressor
The Air Venturil Rail Lock spring compressor is compact.

This report covers:

  • Attaches to the scope rail
  • Let’s look at the unit in detail
  • How shall I test it?
  • Developed for gas spring guns
  • Installation
  • The coolest feature
  • Quirks
  • The price

Today we start looking at a mainspring compressor that’s very different from any other. The Air Venturi Rail Lock spring compressor is a compact 1.5-pound unit that attaches to the scope rail of the gun being disassembled. The threaded rod is then pressed against the end cap of the rifle — whatever configuration that might take. From that point this compressor works the same as any other, but in the next few reports I will show you in detail, plus today we will look at its design very closely.

Attaches to the scope rail

Right off the bat you might be wondering if this unit will fit most spring-piston airguns. As long as they have a scope rail either cut into the spring tube or attached, it will work. There are a few vintage spring rifles and pistols that don’t have rails like the Haenel model 28 pistol and some Diana model 27 rifles, and this compressor won’t work without a rail. But the majority of spring rifles being sold today, plus a number of spring pistols, do have a scope rail. On them the compressor should work well.

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AirForce International Orion PCP air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

AirForce International Orion
The Orion PCP repeater from AirForce International.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Where to start
  • Magazine height
  • Load the mag
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Firing behavior and sound
  • We learn more
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Loading
  • Trigger pull
  • Power adjustability
  • Discussion

Where to start

Today we test the velocity of the AirForce International Orion. Many of you are new to precharged pneumatics (PCP), so let me show you how I select which pellets to test when I don’t know the airgun. I start by looking at the advertised velocity, which for this rifle in .22 caliber is said to be around 800 f.p.s. Knowing how AirForce states things like this, that number is obtained with a reasonable lead pellet, so I will guess it was a Hobby, though they might have shot something heavier. Still my velocities are going to be between 700 and 800 f.p.s. and that tells me I should start with medium weight lead pellets — something in the 13 to 16-grain range. Once we know more we can go from there.

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Umarex Throttle air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Throttle
Umarex Throttle offers a lot for a little money.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • StopShox
  • Mount the scope
  • Accuracy
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Crosman Premiers again
  • JSB RS
  • Some other pellets
  • What next?

Today we look at the accuracy of the new Umarex Throttle air rifle. You may remember that I was very pleased with the performance of this new air rifle, up to this point. If it is also accurate, we have a winner.

StopShox

This rifle contains the StopShox mechanism that takes the sting out of shooting a gas spring. That unit works, because the Throttle definitely does not sting.

Mount the scope

The Throttle came with a 3-9X32 scope and 2-piece scope rings. The Throttle has a Picatinny rail they call the LockDown mounting system. It’s mounted to the top of the spring tube, and the rings are Weaver, so mounting the scope was fast and easy. The optics are clear and this scope has AO (adjustable parallax) that adjusts down to 10 yards.

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2017 SHOT Show: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

  • TexanSS
  • Silenced?
  • New BKL mount
  • Gamo
  • Leapers
  • New 3-12X32 Bugbuster
  • T4 Tactical Compact Prismatic scope
  • The incredible shrinking dot sight!
  • Defense LED Light
  • Steel scope rings
  • More from Air Venturi

TexanSS

Here we go, starting at the AirForce booth, where the big news was the TexanSS, That’s right, kids, AirForce is giving us a silenced big bore!

Silenced?

Can you silence a big bore airgun? Maybe, but not in a package that’s small enough to hunt with. What you can do is reduce the report to the point that it becomes more manageable in a built-up area, and that is what has been done.

TexanSS
AirForce representative, Keeva Segal, holds the new Texan SS.

The TexanSS is an entirely new air rifle. The first offering will be in .45 caliber, but other calibers are sure to follow. The barrel length is 24.75-inches to fit inside the shroud. A shorter barrel means less velocity, and the rifle develops up to 400 foot-pounds, compared to the 500 foot-pounds of the unsilenced Texan that carries the title, “The world’s most powerful production air rifle.” You trade almost a foot of barrel for the quieter operation and still get more power than many big bores can offer.

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BSA Meteor Mark I: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSA Meteor
BSA Meteor Mark I.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4 
Part 5
Part 6

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Scope not good!
  • Sight-in
  • RWS Hobbys
  • The state of the tune
  • RWS Superpoints
  • Results

Today I shoot the BSA Meteor Mark I with its factory scope. This is a 2-power scopes that I doubt was ever filled with nitrogen, so the optics are less than sparking. They are at the toy level, at best.

The test

I’m shooting at 10 meters, using the two pellets that were the most accurate in the last test. The rifle is rested directly on a sandbag, because it demonstrated that was okay in the last test. Last time I shot at 10-meter air pistol targets, but this scope magnifies two times, so now I’m using 10-meter air rifle targets.

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Daisy’s Red Ryder: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

A history of airguns

Daisy Red Ryder
Daisy Red Ryder.

This report covers:

  • Why velocity today?
  • Oil the gun
  • Daisy Premium Grade BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Umarex Precision Steel BBs
  • No Smart Shot BBs
  • Cocking is different
  • Summary

This is our last look at Daisy’s Red Ryder, and how fitting that it comes just in time for Christmas. Every year tens of thousands of Red Ryders are sold in this nation. It’s almost an established part of the holiday season and is certainly a rite of passage for a young shooter. The Daisy company certainly thinks so, as the Red Ryder is the mainstay of their business and has been for a great many decades. No doubt there will be some changes made by the new owners at Gamo, but let’s hope they have the good sense to leave the Red Ryder alone.

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Diana model AR-8: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana AR-8
Diana AR-8 N-TEC air rifle.

  • The rifle
  • Big!
  • Inexpensive?
  • Sights
  • Scope base
  • Trigger
  • Firing behavior
  • Summary

The full title of the rifle we are looking at today is the Diana AR-8 Professional Success. That’s right. Apparently the Germans have hired Koreans to name to their airguns. Remember Shin Sung — Good Luck for Dignified Masterworks?

The rifle

The rifle I’m testing is a .22, but it also comes in .177. The serial number I’m testing is 20067725. The name AR8 is derived from the Blaser R8 Professional bolt action rifle, though that firearm bears little physical resemblance to this air rifle. Perhaps they mean similar in performance within the airgun world.

The AR-8 has a gas piston unit — the Diana N-TEC piston. That is a unitized piston assembly with an internal gas spring. I tested one before in the 340 N-TEC, and I know how nice it can be. Let’s hope the AR-8 tests just as well.

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