BSA Meteor Mark I: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSA Meteor
BSA Meteor Mark I.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4 
Part 5
Part 6

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Scope not good!
  • Sight-in
  • RWS Hobbys
  • The state of the tune
  • RWS Superpoints
  • Results

Today I shoot the BSA Meteor Mark I with its factory scope. This is a 2-power scopes that I doubt was ever filled with nitrogen, so the optics are less than sparking. They are at the toy level, at best.

The test

I’m shooting at 10 meters, using the two pellets that were the most accurate in the last test. The rifle is rested directly on a sandbag, because it demonstrated that was okay in the last test. Last time I shot at 10-meter air pistol targets, but this scope magnifies two times, so now I’m using 10-meter air rifle targets.

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Daisy’s Red Ryder: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

A history of airguns

Daisy Red Ryder
Daisy Red Ryder.

This report covers:

  • Why velocity today?
  • Oil the gun
  • Daisy Premium Grade BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Umarex Precision Steel BBs
  • No Smart Shot BBs
  • Cocking is different
  • Summary

This is our last look at Daisy’s Red Ryder, and how fitting that it comes just in time for Christmas. Every year tens of thousands of Red Ryders are sold in this nation. It’s almost an established part of the holiday season and is certainly a rite of passage for a young shooter. The Daisy company certainly thinks so, as the Red Ryder is the mainstay of their business and has been for a great many decades. No doubt there will be some changes made by the new owners at Gamo, but let’s hope they have the good sense to leave the Red Ryder alone.

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Diana model AR-8: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana AR-8
Diana AR-8 N-TEC air rifle.

  • The rifle
  • Big!
  • Inexpensive?
  • Sights
  • Scope base
  • Trigger
  • Firing behavior
  • Summary

The full title of the rifle we are looking at today is the Diana AR-8 Professional Success. That’s right. Apparently the Germans have hired Koreans to name to their airguns. Remember Shin Sung — Good Luck for Dignified Masterworks?

The rifle

The rifle I’m testing is a .22, but it also comes in .177. The serial number I’m testing is 20067725. The name AR8 is derived from the Blaser R8 Professional bolt action rifle, though that firearm bears little physical resemblance to this air rifle. Perhaps they mean similar in performance within the airgun world.

The AR-8 has a gas piston unit — the Diana N-TEC piston. That is a unitized piston assembly with an internal gas spring. I tested one before in the 340 N-TEC, and I know how nice it can be. Let’s hope the AR-8 tests just as well.

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Hatsan Gladius .177 long: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

Hatsan Gladius
Hatsan Gladius Long.

This report covers:

  • Big lesson!
  • Rings report
  • The test
  • Scope report
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 4.50mm heads
  • H&N Field Target Trophy pellets with 4.50mm heads
  • Summary

Today is the final report on the Hatsan Gladius long air rifle. It is also an interim report on the UTG G4 8-32X56mm scope with that special illuminated half-mil dot reticle. And, by extension, I will be reporting on the new UTG POI rings, though it is difficult to make much of a report on rings. If they do their job they should be almost unnoticeable.

Big lesson!

There are three fundamental truths about airguns that I try to stress whenever possible. First — that a better trigger does not affect accuracy. Second — that a tuneup does not affect accuracy. And the third one is seen today — namely that a more powerful scope does not affect accuracy. We shall see.

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Crosman 600 air pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 600
Crosman 600 CO2 pellet pistol.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Update on the Brice scope mount base for the Daisy Red Ryder
  • A true semiautomatic
  • .22 caliber
  • Power and gas use
  • Ultimate ergonomics
  • Gas caps
  • Sights
  • Safety
  • Modification
  • This pistol
  • Could Crosman do it today?

Update on the Brice scope mount base for the Daisy Red Ryder

I was going to mount an optical sight on my Red Ryder and test it for today’s report. Unfortunately I discovered that the base does not work on my old model 111-40 Red Ryder.

The problem is the rear sight. The mount requires the rear sight elevator to be removed to fit the base, but a 11-40 rear sight doesn’t have an elevator. The sight is tack-welded to the gun and doesn’t come off.

Red Ryder Rear sight
The rear sight on my vintage 111-40 Red Ryder is tack-welded in place. The Brice mount will not fit over it. The raised portion to the right of the sight is the mainspring anchor.

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MeoPro 80 HD Spotting Scope: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Meopta MeoPro HD 80
MeoPro 80 HD spotting scope from Meopta. Image provided by Meopta USA.

This report covers:

  • Bright and sharp
  • Not-so-smart phone
  • Real image
  • Second test at 200 yards
  • What’s next?
  • Photos through the scope

Today I will describe how the smart phone worked with the MeoPro 80 HD spotting scope. First I will report that the Permatex epoxy I used is holding fine. I took the spotting scope and smart phone adaptor to the range and it held the phone perfectly. So, that part works.

First I set up the scope on my Bogen medium-format camera tripod. It is rigid on that mount, which it has to be to see bullet holes in black bullseyes at 200 yards. And the Bogen tripod is as smooth as the scope, allowing perfect alignment with the target.

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MeoPro HD 80 Spotting Scope: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Meopta MeoPro HD 80
MeoPro HD 80 spotting scope from Meopta. Photo provided by Meopta.

This report covers:

  • Otho is interested
  • Attaching my iPhone to the spotting scope
  • Oh-oh!
  • Otho needed the Meopta
  • Fix the problem
  • Stable tripod!
  • How well does it work?

This is a continuation of my report on the MeoPro HD 80 spotting scope from Meopta. I have now purchased this scope, so it’s mine to use from now on. Every time I look at it, I see it for the first time. It’s like being at a party and seeing the prettiest girl there and envying the lucky guy who gets to go home with her — then realizing she’s with you!

Last time I told you about using the scope at the range for the first time. I mentioned it was possible to attach a smart phone to the scope so you could view your targets even larger, because the phone has a zoom capability that’s separate from the spotting scope. Today I want to tell you how that went.

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