BB’s Christmas gift: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
Like all Supergrades, my new rifle is graceful and attractive.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • No front sight
  • The test
  • Beeman Silver Jets
  • Sheridan Cylindricals
  • Crosman Premiers
  • About the same
  • Velocity
  • Variable pumps with Crosman Premier pellets
  • Stability
  • Conclusion

Well, after the last session when the pump mechanism and valve seemed to be fixed I was all set to start testing the Sheridan Supergrade for accuracy. The first thing I did was hoist the rifle to my shoulder, to see whether I could see the front sight through the rear peep. Oh no! I couldn’t see it! So I switched shoulders and looked with my left eye. Oh no! I couldn’t even see it with that eye — the eye I have been calling my good eye. Was there even a front sight on the gun?

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BB’s Christmas gift: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
Like all Supergrades, my new rifle is graceful and attractive.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Wise council
  • A special technique for old multi-pumps
  • Is it holding?
  • Test one
  • How is the pump lever?
  • Test 2 — stability
  • Conclusion

Today I’m recovering from the cataract surgery, but I wrote this on Wednesday, so I was still functional. What I thought I would do is try a little experiment that could work. If it does, I will have found a new technique for restoring an old Sheridan Supergrade. Read Part 2 to learn why this multi-pump is so different from all the others.

Wise council

Before I begin, following Part 2 of this report I heard from airgunsmith Tony McDaniel of TMac’s Airgun Service in North Carolina. Tony is the guy who hosts the North Carolina Airgun Show each year (it’s on Oct. 20 & 21, 2017), and the registration form plus show info is on his website.

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Why own a chronograph?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • No preaching
  • Evaluate an old airgun
  • Test pellets
  • Evaluate a tuneup
  • For detailed tuning and product development
  • What it isn’t

Today is my cataract surgery. I don’t know how well I will be able to function online for the next several days, so will you veteran readers please help the new guys? I know you always do, but I’m just telling you what’s happening.

If you have read this blog for very long you can answer the title question for yourself, because I write about chronographs all the time. I use them for big things like testing the health of a new acquisition (the Sharp Ace Target and the Sheridan Supergrade), and things more subtle (testing the Air Arms Galahad).

No preaching

I used to preach about when to use a chrono and when not to, but I’m not going to do that today. Use it whenever you like and for whatever reason suits you.

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Crosman Legacy 1000: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

It’s been a long time since we had a guest blog. Remember that you are always welcome to write a report for this blog.

The air rifle we are looking at today came out last year. I didn’t have time to test it, so when reader David praised his, I asked him to share his experiences with you.
Today’s report is the first part of the guest blog. David tells us about his experiences with the Crosman Legacy 1000 multi-pump pneumatic air rifle.
If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Over to you, David.

Crosman Legacy 1000
by David

This report covers:

  • Incredible claims
  • Getting the Crosman Legacy 1000
  • Plastic everywhere
  • The trigger
  • Loading pellets
  • Punching groups in paper
  • Crosman Hunting Pointed pellets
  • Crosman Premier Ultra Magnum pellets
  • Winchester Round Nose pellets
  • H&N Sniper Magnum pellets
  • Conclusions

Crosman Legacy 1000
Crosman Legacy 1000.



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2017 SHOT Show: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

  • Umarex USA
  • The Hammer
  • .50 caliber
  • Repeater
  • 4500 psi
  • Absolute zero
  • Second Zero
  • MP 40 BB gun
  • Umarex Forge
  • Trevox and Strike Point
  • Optical Dynamics flashlights
  • Still not finished

Before we begin I want to tell you about a blog series I will start this week. I have the new Air Venturi air compressor on hand and I used it for the first time yesterday. It works so well that I’m jumping the line to get the report started. You can expect to start reading about it this week.

The 2017 SHOT Show was the biggest show I have ever experienced for airguns. Some manufacturers like Crosman and Umarex brought out many new gun models and related products that are really different. Others brought out only one of two items, like the Gamo Swarm Maxim, but they are so significantly different that they deserve to be recognized. My work is cut out for me this year!

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Methods of power adjustment — pneumatics: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Pneumatics
  • Single stroke pneumatics
  • Multi-pump pneumatics
  • Precharged pneumatics
  • Short history of PCPs
  • Barrel length
  • Projectile weight
  • Barrel length and projectile weight together
  • Airflow
  • Springs
  • Valve stem travel
  • Valve angle and contact area
  • What’s the ideal?

This is the second part of a report on the methods of adjusting power in an airgun. Reader Riki asked for the report, and a number of other readers seconded his request. I wasn’t planning to also delve into CO2 guns, but several readers asked for that, and I will get to that in a different report. Today we look at pneumatics.

Pneumatics

A pneumatic airgun is one that uses compressed air to power the pellet. While a spring gun also uses compressed air, it is the method of compression that sets it apart from the pneumatics. In spring guns, a piston moves to compress the air at the instant of firing, where in pneumatics, the air is stored inside in a compressed state, waiting for the trigger to release some or all of it.

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BB’s Christmas gift: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
Like all Supergrades, my new rifle is graceful and attractive.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Pump head may need adjustment
  • Compare to the other Supergrade
  • The other Supergrade
  • Test 2 — stability
  • Four pumps
  • Sick old girl!
  • Test is suspended

Today we look at the power of my new Sheridan Model A, also known as the Supergrade. My low-serial-number rifle was probably made in the 1940s. The wood has certainly been refinished. The rifle seems to function fine, though today will be the very first time I have tested it over a chronograph.

I had pumped the rifle twice when I put it away, and it had held the air when I started this test. That’s a good sign.

The test

I decided to perform my standard test on the rifle, starting with an assessment of the velocity/power at each pump stroke, from 3 to 8. For this test I used .20 caliber Crosman Premiers that are no longer available. It was very revealing.

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