Sheridan Blue Streak: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Blue Streak
My Sheridan Blue Streak was purchased new in 1978.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Not a shooter
  • You’ve got mice!
  • The problem grows
  • The rifle
  • Thumb safety
  • Rocker safety
  • Why so different?
  • Twenty caliber
  • Multi-pump
  • Accuracy
  • Trigger
  • Sights
  • Goodbye, Edie

Some readers asked me to do a memorial blog to my late wife, Edith. Today marks one year since she passed away, but this blog is still infused with her influence. So I thought I would tell you about her favorite airgun — the Sheridan Blue Streak.

Not a shooter

Edith was never a shooter. Even when she shot with me to get her Concealed Carry License, she wasn’t as interested in the shooting aspect as she was in self defense. But she had a soft spot in her heart for the Blue Streak and I’d like to tell you why.

You’ve got mice!

When we moved into our house in Maryland, the last thing the old owners told us was we had mice. There were woods all around us and game was plentiful. We figured with 9 housecats, there wouldn’t be any problem with mice, but we were wrong. Several cats were excellent mousers and caught a lot of them in the beginning, but they didn’t kill them right away. They would play with them, often breaking their legs and watching them squirm around on the floor. Edith had a soft spot for animals and could not abide that, so she asked me to teach her to shoot the Blue Streak, so she could finish them. This was almost a decade before The Airgun Letter was even a glimmer on the horizon.

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Let’s build a multi-pump!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • B.B. is on board
  • Benjamin Marauder
  • Weight and fit
  • Trigger
  • Number of shots
  • Repeater?
  • Quiet?
  • Power
  • Where is the pump tube?
  • Sights
  • Keep those power adjustments?
  • No, to a parts kit
  • Don’t even THINK it!
  • So what?
  • Crosman knows, too

I am not writing an historical report today, because something has crept into our discussions that needs to be addressed. I will make up for this by publishing an extra historical report next Tuesday, along with the Monday and Friday reports.

This will be a good report for airgun companies to read, because it comes straight from the grassroots users of your airguns. They are asking for a specific multi-pump pneumatic.

B.B. is on board

This discussion has been going on for many months — maybe even longer than a year. American airgunners say they would like a high-quality multi-pump pneumatic, and today we are going to look at all that might mean. I’ve just watched this from the sidelines until now, but I do have things to contribute, so today I’m going to start the dialog in ernest.

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Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

Crosman 101

Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic.

This report covers:

  • Different test
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Peep sight adjustment
  • Back to Premiers
  • JSB Exact RS
  • H&N Baracuda Match — 5.53mm head
  • Eley Wasps
  • RWS Superpoints
  • Overall evaluation

Today we look at the accuracy of the .22-caliber Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic. Although I have owned it for many years, it isn’t an airgun I shoot a lot, so this will be as interesting to me as it is to you.

Different test

Because the rifle is so difficult to both cock and load, I shot 5-shot groups today instead of the usual 10. All shooting was done off a sandbag rest at 10 meters. I did find the tiny peep hole a bit challenging to use with my recovering eye, but it was possible. I had the target attached to the backstiop on its side, so all the bulls appear sideways. Let’s see how the rifle did.

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Bully pulpit and the future of airguns

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Bully pulpit
  • Closed ranks
  • Lead, follow or get out of the way
  • A new dynamic
  • The stalwarts
  • Robert Beeman
  • What I did
  • Edith was the inspiration
  • I pulled the plug
  • The big push!
  • It’s not me

Bully pulpit

According to Wiki, “A bully pulpit is a sufficiently conspicuous position that provides an opportunity to speak out and be listened to.” The phrase was coined by Theodore Roosevelt, who felt the White House was a bully pulpit. In his day, the term bully meant excellent.

Closed ranks

When I started my newsletter — The Airgun Letter — in 1994, it was in response to a lack of literature about airguns. There were only a couple books on the subject at that time, and it seemed as if the serious airgunners wanted to hide their passion. Advanced collectors told me what a shame it is to have a reference like the Blue Book of Airguns, because now everybody can know what they know. In the past, they relied on ignorance to grow their collections at low prices. But when everyone can know that a Winsel CO2 pistol is ultra-rare, they stop selling them for $50, and the price climbs to over $1,000.

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Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Crosman 101
Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic.

This report covers:

  • Crosman-101-classic
  • Description
  • Peep sight
  • Cocking knobs
  • Materials
  • History
  • Maintenance
  • Crosman 101CG

I was trying to report on rebuilding the Daisy 853 today, but a last-minute change prevented that. One of our readers, Paperweight, sent me Daisy’s very detailed .pdf file on rebuilding the 753/853 that has far more detail than the one on Pilkington’s website. It includes some steps that Pilkington overlooks, and those steps are vital. He also told me that the brown o-ring goes on the action and the black one goes on the pump piston. I had followed someone else’s directions and had them reversed. So I had to backtrack and switch the o-rings, plus I used the more detailed Daisy instructions to assemble the gun. I’ll tell you more when I do that report.

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Swedish Excellent: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Swedish Excellent
My Swedish Excellent CII rifle is a multi-pump pneumatic.

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Most important blog
  • Ammo variations
  • Swedish Excellent lead balls
  • Strange thing happened
  • Lobo balls
  • Known facts
  • Huge size variation!
  • Proof that size really matters
  • What could this mean?
  • Serendipity
  • Casey at the bat

Most important blog

Today I present to you one of the most important reports I have ever written. It doesn’t turn out the way I imagined; it turns out far better! Please enjoy what I feel is the most significant work I have done in a very long time.

Ammo variations

Today is accuracy day for the Swedish Excellent multi-pump pneumatic. In Part 2 we determined the velocity for both the Swedish Excellent round lead balls and also for some lead balls called Lobo from Argentina. The Swedish balls were about 100 f.p.s. faster than the Lobo brand balls, and we discovered that the Lobo balls are about one-thousandth of an inch larger than the Excellent balls. I think the size and perhaps even the uniformity of the ball sizes will play a big role in what happens today.

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Swedish Excellent: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Swedish Excellent
My Swedish Excellent CII rifle is a multi-pump pneumatic.

A history of airguns

Part 1

This report covers:

  • 6 strokes are minimum
  • Slow or fast?
  • Why just 3 shots?
  • Interesting observation
  • 8 pumps
  • 10 pumps
  • Lobo 6 pumps
  • Lobo 8 pumps
  • Lobo 10 pumps
  • Summary

Today we look at the power of the Swedish Excellent multi-pump rifle I recently acquired. Remember that this rifle is an oddball caliber that shoots lead balls measuring 0.213-inches in diameter. I discovered that Argentinian lead balls branded Lobo measure 0.214-inches and will work in the rifle, too. Today I will test them both at differing numbers of pump strokes.

6 strokes are minimum

Right away I discovered that 6 pump strokes are the minimum necessary to shoot this rifle reliably. I stuck several balls on 4 pump strokes. But that was not the only discovery I made.

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