Generation 2 .25 caliber Benjamin Marauder: Part 11

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Marauder synthetic stock
Second-generation Benjamin Marauder in a synthetic stock.

UTG Bubble Leveler scope: Part 1
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10

This report covers:

  • Brief recap
  • Bubble Leveler scope
  • Fill the rifle
  • The test
  • Second target
  • Third target
  • What did we learn?
  • Next
  • Pump-assist Benjamin video

Brief recap

As you may recall, this report now includes the UTG 4-16 Bubble Leveler scope that I am also testing. I mounted it on the gen 2 .25 -caliber Benjamin Marauder rifle because I had my rifle’s action tuned by Tom Himes. The maximum number of good shots on a fill went from 16 to 22-24 and the velocity spread across those magazines dropped to a much smaller number. That means an extra magazine before it’s time to top off again. Tom Himes can be reached at batts@spcracing.com if you want a tune like the one I had. You can read all about it in Parts 8 and 9.

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Christmas gifts for the airgunner: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Gifts for $25 and under
  • Gifts for $100 and under
  • Gifts for $250 and under
  • Gifts with no price limit

First of all, to my American readers — Happy Thanksgiving! I have a lot to be thankful for this year, and I hope you do, too.

With the holidays fast approaching we sometimes need help finding those perfect gifts. This blog offers some of my personal picks this year.

Gifts for $25 and under

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention my book, BB Guns Remembered. It’s the perfect short story collection bathroom reader for someone who enjoys nostalgia. And this book makes the B.B. gun the star. At $10 it’s the perfect stocking-stuffer. If your airgunner likes to read, this is a good one!

Your airgunner may like a tin of Smart Shot Lead BBs. These BBs are on the large side and tend to be more accurate than steel BBs in many guns, plus they are much safer. Before ordering these, be sure to ask your airgunner if he has guns that can use them.

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BSA Airsporter Mark I: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSA Airsporter
The BSA Airsporter Mark I is an all-time classic.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Sleeper?
  • How to date your BSA
  • Condition
  • The rifle
  • Stock
  • Trigger
  • Wood
  • Rust
  • Firing behavior

A few weeks ago I landed several great airguns on the Gun Broken auction website. One was that Mauser 300SL target rifle that we aren’t done with yet and another was the BSF S20 pistol I’m looking at now. The third one was a BSA Airsporter. It’s an taploading underlever whose lever is concealed in the forearm, so it looks much sleeker. I’m sure when it first hit the market in 1948 that it sent shockwaves around the world. In fact Falke copied the action for their famous model 80 and 90 rifles, and Anschütz did the same when they made the sporting rifle that later became the Egyptian Hakim. They all started with the Airsporter Mark I.

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Generation 2 .25 caliber Benjamin Marauder: Part 10

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Marauder synthetic stock
Second-generation Benjamin Marauder in a synthetic stock.

UTG Bubble Leveler scope: Part 1
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9

This report covers:

  • Mounting the Bubble Leveler scope
  • Back to the Marauder
  • Sight in
  • Shooting with this scope!
  • Unanticipated problem
  • I quit!

Oh, boy! This week I get to report on two world-beaters! First there was the Diana AR-8 N-TEC and today it’s the gen 2 Benjamin Marauder. I will show you why I am so happy in a moment, but first, there is another story to tell. I mounted the UTG 4-16 Bubble Leveler scope on this rifle and that gives me a lot more to talk about.

Mounting the Bubble Leveler scope

Why would mounting this scope be any different from mounting any other scope? Simple — because it has a bubble level inside. My trick of bisecting the rear of the receiver with the vertical reticle line took on a whole new dimension when there was a bubble below it. I had to rotate the scope in the rings until the vertical reticle line bisected both the bubble and the receiver, which meant how I held the rifle entered into the process for the first time. It took me a while to get the scope to where the sight picture looked right with the bubble level and the rifle feeling right in my hands.

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BSA Meteor Mark I: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSA Meteor
BSA Meteor Mark I.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4 
Part 5
Part 6

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Scope not good!
  • Sight-in
  • RWS Hobbys
  • The state of the tune
  • RWS Superpoints
  • Results

Today I shoot the BSA Meteor Mark I with its factory scope. This is a 2-power scopes that I doubt was ever filled with nitrogen, so the optics are less than sparking. They are at the toy level, at best.

The test

I’m shooting at 10 meters, using the two pellets that were the most accurate in the last test. The rifle is rested directly on a sandbag, because it demonstrated that was okay in the last test. Last time I shot at 10-meter air pistol targets, but this scope magnifies two times, so now I’m using 10-meter air rifle targets.

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Plan B

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

  • DB Cooper
  • What does this mean to you?
  • Range bags
  • How to spot a newbie
  • Riddle
  • The moral

I started writing today’s blog at 6 am, and three hours into the test I encountered a drop-dead fault with the rifle — something that has to be repaired. So, the test had to end and I was already well into my work day. What to do?

I’ll tell you about the problem when I finally do the review. Today I want to talk about having backup plans.

DB Cooper

When DB Cooper hijacked the airplane and bailed out over southern Washington state, he must have known the FBI would fool with the four parachutes they supplied him. My squadron of the 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment (over a thousand men), spent a month searching the probable impact site with the FBI. The airplane’s flight recorder told us when he left the plane (time, altitude and airspeed) and the weather data for that evening told us the trajectory. We searched for a small crater in the steep mountains and discovered very little of him. If he did crater, it wasn’t inside the search area. We did find the remains of another possible homicide, though, so it wasn’t a complete waste of time.

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UTG 4-16X56 Bubble Leveler scope: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

UTG Bubble Leveler scope
UTG 4-16X56 Bubble Leveler scope.

This report covers:

  • What is a bubble level scope?
  • Bubble levels in scopes are not new
  • Many years in the works
  • See the bubble
  • What do you have to do?
  • Great optics
  • So far
  • The test

Today I start reviewing my dream come true — The UTG 4-16X65 Bubble Leveler scope. It isn’t in stock yet, but the first shipment is in transit and Pyramyd Air is expecting them soon. Guys — this scope will rock the airgun world!

What is a bubble level scope?

A level on the gun allows you to put the barrel and action in the same orientation for every shot. When you do that, the sights that sit above the barrel are also in the same place every time. With scopes that sit far above the bore, this is very important, because tilting the reticle by just a few degrees (called canting) will throw the shot wide. At 50 yards I have moved a pellet as much as 6 inches, based on the orientation of the rifle. Read the report titled Why do you need a scope level? to find out more.

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