Sig MPX pellet sub-machinegun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig Sauer MPX sub-machinegun
Sig Sauer MPX sub-machinegun is a heavy, solid airgun.

This report covers:

  • Wow!
  • Description
  • Match pellets
  • Back to the gun
  • Accuracy
  • Sights
  • 30 Pellets — how do they do it?
  • Manual needs revision
  • Overall evaluation

Today we begin looking at the MPX sub-machinegun from Sig Sauer. This is a different airgun, in that it is is being manufactured for, distributed by, promoted by and sold by Sig Sauer themselves. In other words, this airgun is one Sig is proud of — and in case you aren’t a firearm shooter, Sig is very proud of everything they make and sell.

I waited patiently for this gun. I know others beat me to the punch, but their enthusiasm may have caused some problems. A few guns were allowed to go out without the company’s stamp of approval. I watched as that happened and I waited until things were right. Sig tells me they are right now, so the airguns I will test for you are the ones Sig is proud to sell.

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2016 SHOT Show: Day 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

2016 SHOT Show: Day 1
2016 SHOT Show: Day 2
2016 SHOT Show: Day 3

This report covers:

  • Umarex USA
  • Action Sport Games
  • Beeman
  • Gamo
  • Something fun
  • Xisico
  • Megaboom
  • Meopta
  • Good-bye

Today I will present the last report on the 2016 SHOT Show.

Umarex USA

There is one more new gun in the Umarex USA booth. It was a show special model of their Beretta M9 pistol. This one was weathered to look like it had seen service. It was their Desert Storm commemorative. They had it in a glass case, rotating throughout the entire show for buyers to see, and they limited the number of guns each dealer could purchase. They increased the total number of guns made from 500 to 750, and as always, they sold out quickly.

Beretta Desert Storm
Beretta Desert Storm commemorative pistol was featured in the Umarex USA booth.

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2016 SHOT Show: Day 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Shot Show Media Day
Shot Show Day 1
Shot Show Day 2

This report covers:

  • Not just airguns
  • Galahad
  • RWS USA (Umarex USA)
  • Beautiful breakbarrel
  • Walther Maximathor and Rotek
  • Brodax
  • AirForce Airguns
  • Crosman
  • More to come

Not just airguns

SHOT is a trade show, but that’s not all. It’s also a place where old friends get to meet and chat at least one time each year. Some of these folks only see each other at SHOT. I was walking up an aisle on day three and someone called my name. Now, I have visual agnosia, which means I can’t recognize faces. I even couldn’t recognize my wife unless I knew what clothes she was wearing that day. Sounds funny, but it’s not when you live it.

So this tall gentleman calls my name and steps up to shake my hand like we were old friends. After I saw his nametag (thank the Lord for them!), I knew that we were. It was Wes Richardson — the guy who developed the Walther Dominator field target rifle with me back in the 1990s. He had been seriously ill and it showed, but he was upright and taking nutrition, as they say, so the news was good. Meeting old friends is a big part of attending the SHOT Show.

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Media Day at the Range

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Shot Show Day 1
Shot Show Day 2
Shot Show Day 3

This report covers:

  • Media Day
  • Only Crosman
  • Pioneer
  • Regulated
  • Was I impressed?
  • Shotguns

Media Day

Every year the SHOT Show holds Media Day at the Range, an all-day event at a huge range sounth of Las Vegas. Over a hundred businesses and more than a thousand media professionals are involved. It’s the place that allows the gun writers to say, “I shot that at the SHOT Show” — something no one else can say, because no functional guns or any kind are permitted at the show. Only security guards have functional guns.

Media ranges
The ranges stretch to the top of the hill on the left and as far again beyond. Media Day is big!

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Generation 2 .25 caliber Benjamin Marauder: Part 8

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Marauder synthetic stock
Second-generation Benjamin Marauder in a synthetic stock.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

This report covers:

  • Early start
  • UTG scope a plus!
  • Quiet rifle!
  • The test
  • Benjamin domes
  • JSB Exact Kings
  • Analysis
  • Where do I go from here?

It’s been a month since we last looked at the .25-caliber gen 2 Benjamin Marauder. I said at the end of Part 7 that I would try the rifle at 100 yards for you. Well, today is the day.

Early start

To shoot a pellet rifle at 100 yards the wind has to be absolutely still. In Texas where I shoot that almost certainly means in the early morning, because once the sun rises the wind starts blowing. So I arrived at the range while the stars are still out and I set everything up, waiting for the dawn. No breeze was blowing on this morning, making the conditions perfect.

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Hand pumps for the ancient big bores: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Air intake and outlet valves
  • The key to the test
  • That’s not all
  • I tested one, too
  • More questions answered
  • Maintaining consistency
  • Three-stage hand pumps
  • Summary

Today I will hopefully answer all your questions about the hand pump test that Dennis Quackenbush and I did many years ago. Remember — we were trying to determine how powerful the old big bore airguns had been. One part of that was knowing what kind of air pressure they used, and that is all we are looking at in this report.

Air intake and outlet valves

First I want to address a question from reader GunFun1. He asked about the pump’s air inlet valve. I told him there was no inlet valve. There is an air hole located at the top of the pump cylinder, and when the pump piston head rises past it, air is sucked into the cylinder — exactly the same as a conventional piston port 2-stroke engine. No valve is required. When the piston head drops below the air hole, the cylinder is sealed again and the piston is able to compress the air that’s now trapped inside.

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Hand pumps for the ancient big bores: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • How powerful were antique big bores?
  • How were they filled?
  • No one knew
  • Hand pumps of antiquity
  • Empirical testing
  • Early rapper
  • Single-stage pump tradeoff
  • But wait — there’s more!
  • Summary

Dennis Quackenbush has always been helpful when it comes to the difficult questions about airguns. Over the years, he and I have experimented with several fundamental questions; the most recent being the $100 PCP. I should have an update on that one for you in a couple weeks.

How powerful were antique big bores?

Back in the 1990s — the days when I was still writing The Airgun Letter and Airgun Revue magazine — I had a prolonged discussion with Dennis about the performance of big bore airguns of antiquity. He had just come out with the .375-caliber Brigand that was about to start the airgun world on its modern journey toward big bores, and there was a lot of interest in them.

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