The Benjamin Bulldog big bore: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Benjamin Bulldog
Benjamin’s new Bulldog bullpup big bore air rifle is a .357-caliber 5-shot repeater.

This report covers:

  • Tin Starr Bullets
  • Tin Starr 101-grain SWC
  • Air management
  • Tin Starr 108-grain truncated cone
  • Air Venturi round ball
  • Eun Jin 9mm domed pellets
  • Tin Starr 128-grain round nose
  • Back to the Tin Starr 101-grain SWC
  • Velocity
  • More to come

Thanks for being so patient on this report. I last looked at the Benjamin Bulldog .357 big bore air rifle on April 2. April was a very busy month for me and I had to put all trips to the range on hold. But I’m back in the saddle now, and there will be more tests of this Bulldog, as well as a couple accuracy tests of the Hatsan BT-65, which was also left hanging.

Tin Starr Bullets

The good news is that, while I was busy, Johnny Hill of Tin Starr Bullets made me a bunch of new bullets. I like his bullets because they’re pure lead and very soft. That seems to make a difference when it comes to accuracy. Last time, I tried his bullets that were sized 0.356, but today I’ll show you what they do at 0.357 inches. The difference is dramatic!

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Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana N-TEC 340 Classic
Diana N-TEC 340 Classic air rifle

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Baracuda Match pellets, 4.50mm head
  • Baracuda Match pellets, 4.53mm head
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Fast action
  • Learning the trigger
  • JSB Exact heavy pellets, 10.34 grains
  • The bottom line — so far

Let’s start looking at the accuracy of the Diana 340 N-TEC Classic rifle. I used the open sights that come on the rifle, and I shot at 10 meters today. I did that because air rifles with gas springs are, in my experience, not all that accurate. I did feel the 340 N-TEC is a different breed of gas-spring rifle, but I wanted to play it safe. So, 10 meters off a rest.

Baracuda Match pellets, 4.50mm head

The first pellet I shot was the H&N Baracuda with a 4.50mm head. It hit the target a little high and to the left; so, after shooting the group, I adjusted the sights.

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Ballistic coefficient: What is it? Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Review
  • Today’s discussion
  • Round balls
  • Conical bullets
  • Smokeless powder
  • A big point
  • Shape
  • Round balls — again
  • The bottom line

I’ve taken 11 months to return to this subject of ballistic coefficients (BC). That was in spite of some tremendous interest in Part 1 of this report last May.

I’m purposely avoiding all discussion of mathematics, which is difficult, since ballistics is a discipline that heavily employs mathematics. But I’m not qualified to write about the math; and, more importantly, I know that 99 percent of my readers would be turned off if I were to write the report that way.

Review

Last time we learned that the BC of a pellet:

• Is an extremely small decimal fraction compared to the BC of a conical bullet.
• Varies with the velocity of the pellet.
• Varies with the shape (form) of the pellet.

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H&N Hornet pellet: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

We’ve closed down comments on this blog report as of May 4, 2015. When we have a chance to remove the political attack comments, we’ll open this up again for comments.

Part 1

H&N Hornet

H&N Hornet pellets

This report covers:

  • The first test
  • Today’s test
  • On to the Hornet
  • What’s next?
  • 2015 Pyramyd Air Cup

Readers suggested I test the Hornet in my TX200 Mark III. I could do that, and it would be easier than the rifle I chose to use for today’s test. But is it realistic? Most readers don’t own a TX and won’t buy one. I chose to test the pellet at high power in my Diana RWS 34P — a rifle of incredible accuracy when the correct hold is used. This is an air rifle that many more shooters around the world are likely to own.

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Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana N-TEC 340 Classic
Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Cocking effort
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • H&N Baracuda Match pellets, 4.50mm head
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Why the slow shots?
  • Trigger
  • Evaluation so far

Cocking effort

Today, we’ll look at the velocity of the Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle. I said in part 1 that cocking this rifle is a chore for 2 hands, but I’ve learned something about the gun in this test. The gas spring isn’t the only thing I’m fighting to cock the rifle. The barrel pivot joint is also a bit too tight. The cocking effort is about 35 lbs, which isn’t that bad, but the pivot joint boosts that up to 42 lbs. It made the rifle difficult to measure, but I soon learned to rapidly pull down the barrel and bypass the pivot joint tension. Then, it is a one-handed operation.

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Best of B.B.: Spring gun performance as caliber changes

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Spring gun performance as caliber changes
  • .177 caliber
  • .20 caliber
  • .22 caliber
  • .25 caliber
  • Results

This is a report I wrote in 2008. I selected it for today’s blog because we have so many new readers that I felt it would be good to go over the basics, again. We’re going to discuss the basics of spring-gun power. This report demonstrates how the muzzle energy of a spring gun increases as the caliber increases.

Spring gun performance as caliber changes

This is an indoor test I’ve wanted to do for more than 10 years. Because I own a Whiscombe JW 75 with all four smallbore barrels, I can test how each caliber performs with the rifle set at one specific power level so I can control as many variables as possible.

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RWS Diana 45: Part 9

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8

RWS Diana 45 air rifle
Diana 45 is a large breakbarrel spring rifle.

This report covers:

  • First shot at 12 feet
  • Firing behavior
  • At 25 yards
  • First group
  • Second group
  • Velocity retest
  • Overall evaluation

Today, I’m testing the tuned Diana 45 at 25 yards. This time, I’ll use a scope. I mounted an obsolete CenterPoint 3-9X40AO scope on the rifle. Because this is a vintage Diana rifle, which is always a drooper, I used a UTG drooper scope base. The one I used was a prototype that was left from when I was testing different base angles for Leapers. I selected one with a very slight droop of a couple degrees — less than what you can buy from Pyramyd Air.

First shot at 12 feet

I always sight in close to the target, so I know that I’m on when I move back to 25 yards. I was so close that the target was blurry in the scope with the parallax set as close as it would go.

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