Hatsan BT65 QE: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Hatsan BT65 QE
Hatsan BT65 QE.

This report covers:

  • Eun Jin pellets
  • Predator Polymag pellets
  • JSB Exact King pellets
  • Bottom line

This is the final test of the Hatsan BT65 QE. I’ve enjoyed working with this rifle. Once I got the silencer issue sorted, the gun became quite accurate. Today, I’ll try some other pellets, and I’ll also try a group at 100 yards. The silencer parts are still out of the shroud, so there’s nothing to hinder the flight of each pellet.

Eun Jin pellets

I tried the 35.8-grain .25-caliber Eun Jin dome first. Because of the rotary magazine, I was concerned this long pellet might not fit, but it did. It fit fine. And it cycled through the action without a fault. But accuracy was a different story.

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Interesting gun designs — Benjamin Legacy: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Benjamin Legacy SE
Benjamin Legacy with a gas spring was a short-lived breakbarrel.

This report covers:

  • Something special from the back room!
  • Benefits of a lower-pressure gas spring
  • Trigger
  • Lower power
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Crosman Premier pellets
  • JSB Exact RS pellets
  • The point of this review

Something special from the back room!

I’m going slow with this report, because it concerns an airgun you cannot purchase. Read Part 2 to see where I found out about the .22-caliber Benjamin Legacy breakbarrel with a gas spring — not the Legacy with a steel spring that sold many years earlier. In the 3 months between the time I contracted pancreatitis in March of 2010 until I was discharged from the last hospital in June of that year, the Benjamin Legacy with gas spring was born, died and forgotten. I never had the chance to review it for you.

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The Benjamin Bulldog big bore: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Benjamin Bulldog
Benjamin’s new Bulldog bullpup big bore air rifle is a .357-caliber 5-shot repeater.

This report covers:

  • Pellets
  • H&N Grizzly pellets
  • JSB Exact King 35 pellets
  • Velocity for the King
  • Air Venturi round nose bullets
  • Velocity for the round nose
  • One more trip to the range?

Benjamin Bulldog Tom on bench
This was a good day to test the new Benjamin Bulldog.

I spent another day at the range with the Benjamin Bulldog .357 air rifle. The day was calm, but that doesn’t matter as much when you’re shooting a big bore.

I think I’ve decided what the Bulldog is best suited to do. Besides being a very handy rifle for medium-sized critters like coyotes and javelinas, the Bulldog is a wonderful big bore for general plinking. I know that a lot of airgunners buy big bores without thinking of the use they’ll put them to, and plinking seems to be the top choice; but most guns are not suited to a lot of shooting. They use too much air and constantly have to be topped off. The Bulldog will give you 10 good shots on a filll and with the right ammo, it seems like the ideal big bore to plink with.

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HW 35 Luxus: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

HW35
HW35 Luxus

This report covers:

  • Trigger adjustment
  • 150 shots
  • In the beginning
  • Best pellet
  • Doubting Thomas
  • No target sights
  • No scope
  • The solution
  • Stock screws
  • Barrel pivot
  • Day two
  • What’s next?

Today, we’ll look at the accuracy of my HW35 Luxus. I’m shooting from a rest at 25 yards, and the gun lies directly on the sandbag. I tried holding it with the artillery hold, and it made no difference in group size.

Trigger adjustment

I tested the Rekord trigger before starting and found it was releasing at 2 lbs., 9 oz. That’s a bit too heavy for a Rekord, so I backed out the aluminum trigger adjustment screw as far as it would go and learned something valuable. On the lightest adjustment, the stage-two release of this trigger is just 14 oz. That’s too light for a sporting rifle. It’s almost like a match Rekord that has a lighter return spring. So, I tightened the screw until the release was exactly 1 lb., 8 oz. That feels both safe and right.

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Testing the .177 Pelletgage: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Pelletgage
The Pelletgage comes in .177 and .22 calibers at the present.

This report covers:

  • Texas airgun show
  • Today’s test
  • The challenge
  • Qiang Yuan Olympic pellets
  • Time to change direction?
  • Crosman Premier Supermatch
  • A chance to check the pellet skirts
  • Test 1 — youth program pellets
  • Discussion of the 3 targets
  • Coaches — pay attention!
  • Test 2 — Can you test quality into a product?
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Texas airgun show

Before we begin, I want to remind all of you that the Texas airgun show will be held on Saturday, August 29. There’s a link at the top of this blog page that takes you to the show flier for all the information.

On Friday evening before the show, the public is invited to attend a reception at the Texas Star Ranch and Retreat, located near the show. American Airgunner will film an episode of the Round Table and welcome questions from the audience.

We have dealers coming from all over the United States, including some major retailers who will have premium pellets, CO2 and other necessary expendibles for sale. A range will be available all day for the public to try different airguns, and we’re going to host the LASSO big bore airgun competition.

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Walther Terrus Air Rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Walther Terrus
Walther’s Terrus rifle with synthetic stock.

This report covers:

  • A sweet action
  • The artillery hold
  • Accuracy
  • Pellets that were less than promising
  • Groups that seem to hold promise
  • Where does this leave us?

Today, we’ll look at the Walther Terrus breakbarrel air rifle accuracy with open sights at 25 yards. I lit the target with a 500-watt halogen light and shot from a dark position, so the fiberoptic sights blacked out completely and looked like conventional post-and-notch sights.

A sweet action

When I cocked the rifle for the first shot, I was reminded of what a sweet action this rifle has. The cocking effort is light, and the breech locks up positively in a way I can’t describe. One click and it’s closed — solid. No muss, no fuss and no movement after the click. It feels like it has a barrel lock, but it doesn’t.

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Shooting Chrony Alpha Master

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Alpha Master chronograph
Shooting Chrony Alpha Master chronograph has a control box with display that separates from the skyscreens by 18 feet. These chronographs are shown with their light diffusers attached, but I don’t use them. Read why in the report.

This report covers:

  • What about the false triggering of the skyscreen?
  • Start screen — stop screen
  • Atomic blast wave
  • The solution to false triggering
  • How I use the new chronograph
  • Battery operated
  • Light diffusers
  • Summary

As you may be aware, I shot my Shooting Chrony Alpha chronograph with the Benjamin Bulldog big bore air rifle. It wasn’t the rifle’s fault — it was mine. There were other shooters on the range, so I had to place the chronograph about 10 feet in front of my position to get the skyscreens out from under the metal roof that hangs over the firing line. For range safety rules, I could not get closer to the chronograph. So, I was pointing the airgun to shoot over the skyscreens.

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