Gamo PR-776 pellet revolver: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gamo PR-776 revolver
Gamo PR-776 pellet revolver.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Sights okay
  • First target
  • Shooting fast
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • Observations

This is the report people have been waiting for. How accurate is the Gamo PR-776 pellet revolver? If it proves accurate, the price is certainly in the right place for a revolver that has a real crane and swing out cylinder.

The day before performing this test, I had the revolver out on a test of the Rocket Shot target. I found the revolver doesn’t point naturally for me, and I was unsuccessful on the moving target. But I had a lot more confidence in this test.

Sights okay

I had thought I’d need to paint over the white dot sight on the front post to get real aiming precision; but when I lit the target brightly and shot from a darkened room, the dot became invisible. Dot sights are okay for pointing at a large mass, but they destroy any precision the sights may offer. Fortunately, the PR 776 sights have very rectangular angles; so, when they’re dark, they’re also pretty crisp.

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Interesting gun designs — Benjamin Legacy: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Benjamin Legacy SE
Benjamin Legacy with a gas spring was a short-lived breakbarrel.

This report covers:

  • Getting started
  • The hold
  • First group
  • Second group
  • After that
  • Additional data
  • What’s next?

Let’s look at the accuracy of the .22-caliber Benjamin Legacy gas-spring rifle. If you remember, this was a rifle that came out just before I went into the hospital in 2010. When I got out 3 months later, the gun had already been taken off the market. I never reviewed it for you because it was an airgun you couldn’t buy, but the fact that it only took 16 lbs. of force to cock it fascinated me. I wanted to see what it could do regardless of whether or not you could buy one; because, if this turned out to be a good idea, it’s worth doing again.

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BSF S54 underlever: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 3

 

BSF S54
BSF S54 Match air rifle

This report covers:

  • Some updates — SILE stock
  • Adjustable trigger
  • Front sight hood
  • Rear peep sight/scope base
  • RWS Superpoint pellets
  • Surprise!
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • RWS Diabolo Basic pellets
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger-pull
  • What have I learned?

Some updates — SILE stock

Blog readers Kevin Lentz and Mike Driskill asked whether or not the BSF S54 stock had the marking SILE on it. This one does. It’s at the top of the pistol grip, just behind the back of the spring tube.

BSF S54 SILE
The stock is marked “SILE.” Mike Driskill says many of the S54s he has seen have this mark.

Adjustable trigger

I mentioned that the trigger is adjustable. The adjustment directions can be found on the bottom of the triggerguard.

BSF S54 trigger
The + and – signs tell you what you’re doing to the trigger-pull.

Front sight hood

I left the front sight hood out of the full photo of the gun in part 1, so I’m showing it here.

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Gen 2 .25-caliber Benjamin Marauder: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Marauder air rifle Gen 2Second-generation Benjamin Marauder in a synthetic stock.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 4

This report covers:

  • RAI modular stock
  • The buttstock
  • Leapers
  • Rifle weight
  • Scope
  • Bipod and sling
  • 2015 Texas airgun show

Today, you’ll see the real reason I’m testing the .25-caliber Gen 2 Benjamin Marauder. I had not planned on this test at all! In fact, I found a high-end European air rifle at the SHOT Show that I planned to test for Shotgun News and my personal website. I tried to order that rifle, but it just never happened. So, when Dave Rensing of R. Arms Innovations (RAI) approached me with his modular stock at the Malvern airgun show, I decided to buy a Marauder and test it in a way I’ve never done before. This test will become part of a much larger feature article in Shotgun News this November, which is their full-color edition. If you can’t buy the magazine, don’t fret. It will also be posted on my website a few months after it’s published.

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Crosman’s 2400KT carbine: Part 8

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

Today’s report is the culmination of a guest blog from reader HiveSeeker about his Crosman 2400KT.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

Over to you, HiveSeeker.

Crosman 2400KT
The 2400KT CO2 carbine is available exclusively from the Crosman Custom Shop.

This report covers:

  • Accuracy for .22 caliber: Wows and boos
  • Benjamin Pointed Expanding pellets from the Ultimate Hunting Pellet Assortment (UHPA)
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • The Crosman clan family reunion
  • Benjamin Discovery Hollow Point (UHPA) pellets
  • Crosman Premier Ultra Magnum pellets, Benjamin Discovery Domed Magnum (UHPA) pellets, and Crosman Premier Hollow Point pellets
  • Benjamin Discovery Hollow Point pellets (500-pellet tin)
  • .22 Crosman Premier pellets (boxed)
  • JSB Diabolo Exact Jumbo pellets (15.89 grains)
  • JSB Match Diabolo Exact Jumbo Monster pellets
  • RWS Meisterkugeln pellets
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Conclusion for .22 caliber

Accuracy for .22 caliber: Wows and boos

The accuracy test for the .22 HiveSeeker 2400KT with 18-inch Crosman barrel was also conducted from a bench rest at 10 yards, with 10-pellet groups measured center-to-center. You’ll see that a few of those gremlins are still alive and well, infesting my .22 pellet bin, too! As I did with the .177 pellets, I’ll list my accuracy results alphabetically. Space will again limit our discussion to only the very best pellets — with one notable exception that we’ll address first!

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Gamo PR-776 pellet revolver: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gamo PR-776 revolver
Gamo PR-776 pellet revolver.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • How the cylinder locks
  • Velocity with Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • Double-action pull
  • RWS R10 pistol pellets
  • Crosman Premier Super Match pellets
  • Evaluation to this point
  • Trigger-pull
  • Shot count
  • Evaluation

In part 1 of this review, most of your comments addressed accuracy. You hoped this revolver was accurate and wanted it to be as good as the S&W 586. I also hope it’s accurate, as the low price would make it a world-beater. We’ll take things one step at a time and wait for the accuracy test.

How the cylinder locks

As mentioned in part 1, this revolver has a barrel that’s spring-loaded and moves forward as the cylinder turns. I’ll show you why it does that. The breech is rounded to fit into a recess in the front of each chamber in the cylinder. You get the same gas-sealing effect as the Nagant revolver, only it’s the barrel that moves backwards — not the cylinder that moves forward. That should give us better gas management, but I don’t know what it will do to the accuracy.

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Air shotguns

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • History
  • What an air shotgun has to do to succeed
  • The second key to success
  • Mainstream hunters
  • Below the standard
  • The Orient
  • Yewha BBB Dynamite
  • Fire 201
  • Gamo Viper Express air shotgun
  • Air shotguns today

Air shotguns are a subject that keeps bubbling to the top every few years. With the recent interest in big bore airguns, its time has probably come, again. In today’s report, I want to tell you what has been done in this arena over the past 500 years and also what’s needed to make an air shotgun viable.

History

Air shotguns date back to the beginning of airguns, some time in the middle 16th century. All guns at that time were smoothbore, so not a lot of thought was paid to whether they shot a single projectile or many projectiles. For birds that flew, many projectiles were necessary, although this was before people shot at flying birds.

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