CZ P-09 Duty BB and pellet pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

CZ P-09 Duty
CZ P-09 BB and pellet pistol closely copies the firearm.

This report covers:

• Introduction to the CZ P-09
• Shoots BBs and pellets
• The year of the airgun
• Big pistol!
• Safety almost ambidextrous
• Trigger
• Summary

Introduction to the CZ P-09
Today, we’ll start looking at the CZ P-09 Duty BB and pellet pistol imported by ASG (Action Sport Games). Edith and I saw this pistol at the 2015 SHOT Show and the folks at ASG were very excited about it. When I researched the firearm, I discovered why. Apparently, the CZ P-09 pistol took the firearm world by storm in 2014. It’s an improved version of the P-07, which was well-received in 2009. The P-09 is a 9mm semiautomatic that holds 19+1 rounds. And it’s a polymer-framed pistol that has an exposed hammer — not something you see that often in these days of striker-fired weapons.

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Daisy 1894 Western Carbine: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Daisy 1894
Daisy’s 1894 Western Carbine is a classic BB gun. This one is an NRA Centennial model.

This report covers:

• Preparation for firing
• Daisy Premium Grade BBs
• Crosman Copperhead BBs
• Hornady Black Diamond BBs
• Trigger-pull
• How is the gun?

Let’s look at the velocity of my Daisy model 1894 BB gun. Several of you said you were glad to see this report, and I’m happy to do it for you. The 1894 is a BB gun I simply overlooked when it was available. All of you knew how nice it was, but until now I never had a clue.

Daisy advertised the 1894 as a 300 f.p.s. BB gun. That’s not too hot, but also not on the bottom. It’s a nice place to be if accuracy is all you’re concerned with, because 300 f.p.s. is enough to do everything you need.

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Talon SS versus Ruger 10/22: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Pellet guns versus rimfires
• The Talon SS
• The Ruger 10/22
• Why this test?
• Time to test the airgun and the rimfire
• The plan
• The point

Pellet guns versus rimfires
Today, I’ll begin a report that I’ve wanted to write for many years. How does a pellet rifle stack up against a popular rimfire? When I say, “stack up,” I’m referring to accuracy. The rimfire is still more powerful.

I’ve written many times that a good pellet rifle will bury a rimfire at 50 yards on a calm day. Now, it’s time to find out if that’s correct. Or can a rimfire hold its own?

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Hunting with big bore airguns: What to expect

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This was originally published as “AirForce Texan big bore rifle: Part 4″ because I was writing about that big bore rifle at the time. It doesn’t really apply only to that model, so the title was changed.

AirForce Texan big bore rifle: Part 1
AirForce Texan big bore rifle: Part 2
AirForce Texan big bore rifle: Part 3

Texan big bore
The Texan from AirForce Airguns is a .458 big bore to be reckoned with. The scope and bipod are options.

This report:

• Today’s report is different
• What constitutes a big bore?
• The one unified law
• Respect for game
• Big bore airguns are very different
• There are exceptions
• A big truth about big bore bullets
• Hydrostatic shock
• Why you need to know this

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Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo

Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo.

 

This report covers:

• Crosman Premier lite pellets
• H&N Baracuda Match pellets, 4.53mm head
• Air Arms Falcon pellets
• Conclusion thus far
• What’s next?

Let’s look at the accuracy of the Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo. I’m shooting lead pellets, only, and I’m shooting at 10 meters with open sights. This will not be the last test with pellets, because this combo does have a scope. But for today, I’m just getting used to the rifle and seeing how it does.

I decided to shoot 10 shots off a rest at 10 meters using 5 pumps of air. You can refer back to Part 2 to see what kind of velocity that gives me.

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Crosman’s 2400KT carbine: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Today’s report is the continuation of a guest blog from reader HiveSeeker about his Crosman 2400KT.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

Over to you, HiveSeeker.

Crosman 2400 KT
The 2400KT CO2 carbine is available exclusively from the Crosman Custom Shop.

This report covers:

• A reminder of the two guns
• Barrel length and velocity
• Can you help? Part 2
• New thoughts on barrel length

Part 5 was going to be the Crosman 2400KT .22 velocity test. However, I’d already reported that this gun delivers almost identical velocities in both .177 and .22. When I stated in Part 4 that barrel length alone does not appear to account for this, a number of questions came up. I’d already researched this and knew why I had drawn that conclusion; but without that information, some blog readers had questions. So, let’s jump ahead to what I had already put together about barrel length and its relationship to velocity before moving on.

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RWS Diana 45: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Diana 45
Diana 45 is a large breakbarrel spring rifle.

This report covers:

• Remove the barrel
• Barrel off!
• Remove the piston
• Disassembly is complete
• One last look

We have a lot to cover today, so let’s get right to it. We left the Diana 45 with the mainspring out of the gun at the end of yesterday’s report. The only thing left in the disassembly is to remove the piston. Do not disassemble a gun if you’re not 100% certain you can put it back together again in safe working condition!

Remove the barrel
The piston will not come out of the gun until the cocking link that connects it to the underside of the barrel (for cocking) is removed. To do that, you must first separate the barrel from the spring tube. That step is easy on some breakbarrels, but not so easy with this 45. On most breakbarrels, you remove the pivot bolt from the action forks and the barrel separates from the spring tube. The Diana 45 has another step; and unless you follow it, the barrel will never come off the gun.

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