Resurrecting a classic airgun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Your new air cane
  • Oh-oh!
  • But I saw this on TV
  • Back to reality
  • What can break on a vintage air cane?
  • Dialing it back
  • Does this really work?

Merry Christmas! I hope this day finds you smiling and joyful.

Today I want to discuss a topic that seldom arises, yet is at the forefront of every novice collector’s mind. Namely, “Should I (and can I) shoot my antique airgun?” Many of you will agree there is no one right answer to this question, because the answer depends on many things. Today I’d like to discuss a few of them.

Your new air cane

Let’s say you went to an airgun show and were captivated by a beautiful air cane that was still in its original case with all the accoutrements. When you saw it for the first time your heart melted and your wallet popped open with unaccustomed speed. You wanted this air cane!

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Remington 1911 RAC BB pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Remington 1911RAC pistol
Remington’s 1911RAC is very realistic to look at and when held.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Realistic
  • Reviews
  • Installing the CO2
  • Loading
  • Daisy BBs
  • A puff of CO2
  • Loss of gas
  • Blowback is strong!
  • H&N Smart Shot
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Where do we go from here?

Today we look at the operation and velocity of the Remington 1911RAC BB pistol. I will test it with both steel BBs and with the new Smart Shot lead BBs from H&N. I failed to mention in Part 1 that there is also a Remington 1911RAC Tactial BB pistol, as well.

Realistic

I commented on the realism of this pistol in Part 1 and several readers answered with their own comments. Those who have seen and held the gun agree it is very realistic. Nobody likes the white lettering on the sides of the slide and frame, but the heft of the gun probably trumps that for many shooters.

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Daisy Number 12, Model 29 BB gun: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

Daisy Number 12, Model 29 BB gun: Part 1

Daisy model 29
Daisy Number 12 Model 20 is a vintage BB gun.

This report covers:

  • Preparation
  • Daisy BBs
  • Air Venturi BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Shooting to the left?
  • Accuracy
  • No joy
  • 4.4 mm lead balls
  • Conclusion

Today we will look at both the accuracy and power of the Daisy Model 12 Number 29 BB gun you all seemed to enjoy. Let’s get to it

Preparation

This vintage BB gun has a leather plunger (piston seal), so I made sure it was well oiled before I started the velocity test. I had soaked the plunger in oil for several weeks before this test.

Daisy BBs

First up were Daisy Premium Grade BBs. They averaged 307 f.p.s. through the chronograph. The low was 299 f.p.s and the high was 327 f.p.s., so the total spread was 28 f.p.s. That’s pretty fast for a conventional spring-powered BB gun by today’s standards. I wasn’t expecting much over 250 f.p.s..

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H&N Excite Smart Shot copper-plated lead BBs: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Smart Shot BBs
H&N Excite Smart Shot BBs are the first lead BB in 90 years.

Part 1
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Colt Single Action Army BB gun
  • All SAAs shoot the same
  • Safety
  • Velocity Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Velocity Excite Smart Shot BBs
  • Accuracy with steel
  • Accuracy with lead
  • Conclusions

Today I begin testing the new H&N Excite Smart Shot copper-plated lead BB for you. There will be many tests of this BB. Today I will start with an airgun that I think will be ideal because of the way it is designed. I will test today with the Colt Single Action Army BB gun.

Colt Single Action Army BB gun

This BB gun is one that the world waited for. And when Umarex brought it out, they nailed it. It’s everything you could want in a BB revolver that is still affordable. And they didn’t rest on their laurels, either. The first guns were a blued model and a nickle-plated one — both with the artillery-length 5-1/2 inch barrel. Within a year, they added the trail-worn gun that shooters love so much. The first iteration was 500 U.S. Marshal’s Museum models, followed by 500 NRA specials with the same finish. The Marshal’s models sold out at the SHOT Show in 2 days. The NRA guns are all gone too, though Pyramyd Air did stock them until the last one sold.

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The rise of the BB gun: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Return to normalcy
  • Modern production methods
  • Daisy changes manufacturing processes
  • The age of repeaters
  • Quick Kill
  • Two major BB guns
  • BBs get better through competition
  • Are we finished?

Return to normalcy

In Part 1 we ended our look at the progress of the BB gun just after World War II. I had mentioned that the war stopped the production of BB guns so the manufacturers could make wartime items. When the war was over, there was still a period of time when raw materials were hard to come by. They had been stockpiled for the war and were not in the general channels of distribution for over a year. The government sold most of its stockpiles, but these sales took many years to complete and the materials were often not located where they were needed the most. So a lot of time passed while things returned to normal.

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The invention of rifling: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Nobody knows when rifling was invented
  • What is rifling?
  • The first rifling
  • Gunpowder leaves dirt in the bore
  • Minie Ball
  • Trapdoor Springfield development
  • Ballard rifling
  • Airgun rifling

Nobody knows when rifling was invented

I’ve been reading about guns for 56 years and the one subject that has always baffled the experts is rifling. When was it invented? By whom? What gave them the idea? One thing is certain — the Wiki piece on rifling is entirely fabricated. It says “Rifling was invented in Augsberg, Germany, at the end of the 15th century. It would be wonderful if that were true, but the fact is nobody knows where, when or why rifling came into being. To be fair to Wiki, I have read other accounts that claim people in the 1400s were thinking of spinning a ball for stability in flight because they knew the fletches on arrows stabilized them the same way. The truth is, though, no one knows for certain when rifling came into being. It is entirely possible it came from several locations around the same time.

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Air Venturi Wing Shot Review

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is your first look at the new Air Venturi air shotgun by Sam Yang. This is a guest blog about the new Air Venturi Wing Shot air shotgun, written by Pyramyd Air’s Derek Goins.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Over to you, Derek.

 


The brand new Air Venturi Wing Shot – the first .50 caliber smoothbore air shotgun.

 This report covers:

  • Wing Shot Overview
  • Shot Shell Design
  • Patterns
  • Lethality
  • More Than Meets the Eye
  • Nits and Picks
  • Simple & Utilitarian
  • Check Before You Shoot

Introduction

In modern airgunning we don’t see many guns that surprise us anymore. There are rifles capable of hole in hole accuracy or killing animals as large as deer.  However, very rarely, a gun is born that can fill multiple roles. Combining utility, simplicity, and ultimate versatility is a tough task for any manufacturer.  But it’s not an air rifle I speak of, but instead a gun that airgunners have not seen in years; perhaps not at all!  I am excited and humbled to bring you the new  Air Venturi Wing Shot air shotgun!

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