The Gat’s where it’s at!: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gat
The Gat is a timeless classic air pistol. Shown uncocked here.

A history of airguns

    • Description
    • Loading
    • Cocking
    • Trigger
    • Ammo
    • A classic!

    My late wife, Edith, once told me that my writing style should be called discovery writing. She said I didn’t have to know everything I wrote about, because I could just discover it as I went and then share what I discovered with my readers. That’s good, because I sure don’t know a lot of the things I write about. Does that make any sense?

    Today’s report is on an airgun about which I know very little — the Gat. Over the years I have read things about Gats and one of them is that, while there may be many Gat-like airguns, the true Gat only comes from T. J. Harrington & Son, Walton, Surrey, England. They made them from 1937 through the late 1980s.

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How and why airguns change over time

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • They don’t make ‘em like they used to
  • Are today’s airguns better?
  • 1. Technology — back then
  • Technology — now
  • 2. Understanding the principles — back then
  • Understanding the principles — now
  • 3. Company staff and leadership — back then
  • Company staff and leadership — now
  • 4. Market trends — then and now
  • Summary

Happy New Year! May 2016 be a good year for all of us.

They don’t make ‘em like they used to

Ain’t that the truth? Nothing is the same anymore. Usually when people discuss this subject they only remember the good things from the past. Things like the heavy metal Detroit muscle cars that had huge engines. They forget that those engines had to be tuned up every 10K miles, or that they often leaked oil.

As far as airguns go people remember blued steel and walnut stocks. They remember airguns that were made like firearms, and they both looked and felt like it. But a lot of facts are edited out.

Before 1970, an airgun that could achieve 800 feet per second (f.p.s.) velocity was considered a magnum. Today, the same gun would be a youth model, or at best an adult plinker. Today’s airguns top 1,000 f.p.s. regularly. The fastest exceed 1,400 f.p.s.

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Daisy model 177 Targeteer BB pistol: Parts 2 & 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Daisy Targeteer
Daisy’s Targeteer 177 shot BBs.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Velocity
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • H&N Smart Shot BBs
  • Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • Summary of velocity
  • Accuracy
  • Air Venturi
  • No real rear notch
  • Hornady Black Diamond
  • H&N Smart Shot
  • Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • Plinking
  • Overall evaluation

Thursday, December 24, is Christmas Eve. On that day I’m running a special blog that allows you readers to do most of the writing. We will all tell which airgun we would like to receive for Christmas, and I will start it in the text. Be thinking about the one airgun you want the most this year.

I realize that not all readers celebrate the Christmas holiday. But don’t let that deter you. Whether you celebrate or not, this exercise is open to all readers.

Starting tomorrow I’m running some Best of B.B. reports to give myself some time at Christmas. I have family and guests coming this week, and I can’t get to the computer as often as I would like. Today’s report is new.

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Feinwerkbau Model 2 target pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB model 2 pistol
FWB model 2 target air pistol.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Getting started
  • Filling the tanks
  • Attach a reservoir to the gun
  • Adjusting velocity with Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • Switched reservoirs
  • Discussing these problems helps new shooters
  • Read the manual
  • Tried other pellets
  • What is happening?

We are looking at a used FWB model 2 10-meter target pistol that runs on bulk CO2. I found this pistol for reader Mitch, who asked if there were any good target pistols for under a thousand dollars. I told him to look at used guns, and to look at the best brands. I found this one on the American Airguns classified ads page and, when Mitch decided to pass on it, I bought it. The whole story is in Part 1.

Not only was this a super buy, this is the very first FWB target pistol that had modern features. The target pistols prior to the model 2 were the FWB 65/80/90 which all had spring piston powerplants. They were great for their day and are still fine airguns today, but the refinements of the model 2 are a more adjustable trigger, adjustable power and better weight and balance.

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Haenel model 100 BB pistol and Daisy number 12 model 29 BB gun: Parts 2 and 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Haenel 100: Part 1
Daisy number 12 model 29: Part 1
Daisy number 12 model 29: Part 2

Haenel BB pistol
The Haenel 100 BB pistol is a pre-war 50-shot repeater.

Daisy model 29
Daisy Number 12 Model 20 is a vintage BB gun.

This report covers:

  • Haenel 100 first
  • Precision Ground Shot
  • The test
  • Haenel accuracy
  • Daisy model 29 accuracy
  • First target
  • The turning point!
  • Target two
  • Conclusions

I am combining two reports today — the Haenel model 100 BB pistol and the Daisy number 12 model 29 BB gun. Please don’t get confused. If you have been following the series on the Daisy 29, you know that something good must have happened for me to do this special report. Indeed it did! Let’s get started.

Haenel 100 first

The first task was to chronograph the Haenel pistol. You may recall that the Blue Book of Airguns informs us that the Haenel 100 uses 4.4 mm lead balls, so I started with them.

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Feinwerkbau Model 2 target pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB model 2 pistol
FWB model 2 target air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Affordable target pistol
  • The importance of a grip
  • A huge price gap
  • FWB Model 2
  • How I got this gun
  • Back to the gun
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Dry-fire device
  • Grips
  • Accuracy
  • More to come

Affordable target pistol

Today we begin a report on an air pistol — the FWB Model 2. It’s a 10-meter pistol that was made back in the 1980s. I’ll tell you all about it, but first I want to tell you that this series is not really just about this one pistol. It’s really a response to reader, Mitch, who asked me about any 10-meter target pistol I knew of for under a thousand dollars. Like many shooters, Mitch wants to try his hand at 10-meter shooting. He plans to purchase a Gamo Compact now, but in case he finds that he likes 10-meter he wanted to know if there was a better target pistol that he could afford.

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Haenel model 100 BB pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Haenel history
  • Haenel 100
  • Not a BB pistol?
  • Odd way of cocking
  • Nickel finish
  • Crude sights
  • Shot tube
  • Functioning
  • The future

Haenel history

Of the many European airgun manufacturers, only a few like Walther, Feinwerkbau and Diana are well-known to American airgunners. Other makers like Falke of Germany and Peiper of Belgium produced airguns in quantity, but they escaped our notice. The greatest of these makers was perhaps the Haenel company that was founded by Carl Gottleib Haenel in 1840. By the 1930s, Haenel was producing many models of air rifles that would become collector favorites a half-century later in the U.S. I have reviewed a few of these rifles for you already. There was the Haenel 310 bolt action target rifle that shoots 4.4mm lead balls. That one came into the U.S. after the Wall fell in 1989. The East German Stasi used them as youth trainers and when the Germans took over they sold them as surplus.

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