Walther Terrus air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Walther Terrus
Walther’s Terrus rifle with synthetic stock.

This report covers:

  • Open sight test
  • Different artillery hold
  • Cleaned the barrel
  • Mounted the scope
  • First shot — lost my aim point!
  • Crosman Premier pellets
  • RWS Meisterkugeln pellets
  • Overall evaluation

Today, I’m scoping the .22-caliber Walther Terrus and shooting it at 25 yards. This is an air rifle for which I have high hopes because it has many great features we have already seen, and the price is as good as it gets. If the Terrus is accurate on top of everything else, we’ll have another world-beater.

Open sight test

In part 3, we shot the Terrus with its open sights at 25 yards. I knew I wasn’t going to be as accurate with open sights, but I’d hoped the rifle would encourage me. I don’t think it did, though. My open-sight groups were close to 2¬†inches or more, though a couple did have some promising clusters. I wondered how much better it would get with a scope.

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Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana N-TEC 340 Classic
Diana 340 N-TEC 340 air rifle

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Scoping a drooper
  • Firing cycle is smooth and quick
  • Trigger takes some learning
  • Artillery hold
  • First group
  • Second group
  • Third group
  • I was pleased!
  • Artillery hold abandoned — the fourth group
  • The bottom line

Boy, has this test turned out to be an eye opener! I had hoped that the Diana 340 N-TEC Classic would not disappoint, and believe me — it didn’t!

Scoping a drooper

Today, I’ll test the rifle scoped at 25 yards. I mounted an AirForce 4-16x scope in UTG Quick Lock Max Strength high Weaver rings;¬†but this is a Diana air rifle, and that means the scope base on the rifle is proprietary. Knowing Diana’s reputation for drooper barrels, I also mounted a prototype UTG drooper scope base on the rifle. They aren’t supposed to fit, but this one did, perhaps because it’s a prototype and not the same as the bases they sell.

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Interesting gun designs — Benjamin Legacy: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Benjamin Legacy SE
Benjamin Legacy with a gas spring was a short-lived breakbarrel.

This report covers:

  • Something special from the back room!
  • Benefits of a lower-pressure gas spring
  • Trigger
  • Lower power
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Crosman Premier pellets
  • JSB Exact RS pellets
  • The point of this review

Something special from the back room!

I’m going slow with this report, because it concerns an airgun you cannot purchase. Read Part 2 to see where I found out about the .22-caliber Benjamin Legacy breakbarrel with a gas spring — not the Legacy with a steel spring that sold many years earlier. In the 3 months between the time I contracted pancreatitis in March of 2010 until I was discharged from the last hospital in June of that year, the Benjamin Legacy with gas spring was born, died and forgotten. I never had the chance to review it for you.

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HW 35 Luxus: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

HW35
HW35 Luxus

This report covers:

  • Trigger adjustment
  • 150 shots
  • In the beginning
  • Best pellet
  • Doubting Thomas
  • No target sights
  • No scope
  • The solution
  • Stock screws
  • Barrel pivot
  • Day two
  • What’s next?

Today, we’ll look at the accuracy of my HW35 Luxus. I’m shooting from a rest at 25 yards, and the gun lies directly on the sandbag. I tried holding it with the artillery hold, and it made no difference in group size.

Trigger adjustment

I tested the Rekord trigger before starting and found it was releasing at 2 lbs., 9 oz. That’s a bit too heavy for a Rekord, so I backed out the aluminum trigger adjustment screw as far as it would go and learned something valuable. On the lightest adjustment, the stage-two release of this trigger is just 14 oz. That’s too light for a sporting rifle. It’s almost like a match Rekord that has a lighter return spring. So, I tightened the screw until the release was exactly 1 lb., 8 oz. That feels both safe and right.

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Walther Terrus air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Walther Terrus
Walther’s Terrus rifle with synthetic stock.

This report covers:

  • A sweet action
  • The artillery hold
  • Accuracy
  • Pellets that were less than promising
  • Groups that seem to hold promise
  • Where does this leave us?

Today, we’ll look at the Walther Terrus breakbarrel air rifle accuracy with open sights at 25 yards. I lit the target with a 500-watt halogen light and shot from a dark position, so the fiberoptic sights blacked out completely and looked like conventional post-and-notch sights.

A sweet action

When I cocked the rifle for the first shot, I was reminded of what a sweet action this rifle has. The cocking effort is light, and the breech locks up positively in a way I can’t describe. One click and it’s closed — solid. No muss, no fuss and no movement after the click. It feels like it has a barrel lock, but it doesn’t.

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HW 35 Luxus: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

HW35
HW35 Luxus

This report covers:

  • Freimark
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • JSB Exact pellets, 8.44-grain dome
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • But wait — there’s more!
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger-pull
  • What’s next?

Today, we’ll find out what kind of powerplant is in my new HW35 Luxus. Is it really a 5.5 foot-pound gun, as the German Freimark (capitol F in a pentagram) indicates, or is it something different?

Freimark

The Freimark is a legal designation from the German government. Guns that have it must not produce over 7.5 joules of energy at the muzzle. That converts to 5.53 foot-pounds. If they qualify, such guns are legal for persons 18 years and older to purchase and own as airguns. If they produce more than 7.5 joules, they are classified as firearms and are controlled by those laws.

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RWS Diana 45: Part 10

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9

RWS Diana 45 air rifle
Diana 45 is a large breakbarrel spring rifle.

This report covers:

  • Cause to reconsider
  • More black tar?
  • What is black tar grease?
  • A quick job
  • Velocity
  • Summary

Today’s report is an unprecedented test. I thought I’d finished the report on the Diana 45 in Part 9, but it still bothered me that I couldn’t get the last bit of vibration out of the gun. I chalked that up to the high number of parts in the rifle’s powerplant. Too many things to make quiet.

Cause to reconsider

Then two things happened that caused me to reconsider. First, while at the Malvern airgun show, I saw and shot a fabulous HW85 that had been tuned by Bryan Enoch. It was stunningly calm. When I talked to him about his tune, Bryan told me that he put a thin coat of black tar grease on the mainspring before he assembled the rifle. That caused me to stop and think — because that tune was perfect.

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