Webley Mark II Service: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service
Webley Mark II Service air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Eley Wasps
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Hobby
  • Observations

Today we see how successful my redneck breech seal fix was. I’m hoping for success, but even if it comes I won’t leave the gun this way. I will size the new seal and install it, or I will accept reader Komitadjie’s kind offer to make me a new seal of the correct size. Either way I will fix the rifle properly. This is just a chance to demonstrate a field fix that can be used in a pinch.

Eley Wasps

Let’s get right to it. First up were the 5.6mm Eley Wasps. Ten of them averaged 371 f.p.s. That is an increase from 308 f.p.s. in Part 2, so the redneck breech seal appears to work.

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Webley Mark II Service: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service
Webley Mark II Service air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The problem
  • Trim the seal
  • Shim the old seal
  • Hole punch
  • Refit the old seal and shim
  • Does it work?

It’s been a while since we looked at the Mark II Service air rifle, asnd I thought it was time to take another look. You will recall in Part 2 I tested the velocity and found the rifle was shooting very slow. There was also a large puff of air at the breech that told me the breech seal needed to be replaced. I ordered one from the UK that took 3 weeks to arrive. When it got here I discovered it had to be sized to fit the breech. That has been shoving the report to the back burner, week after week, until I decided to do something about it.

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Give me MORE POWER

By Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Computer crash
  • More power
  • Is all the power still there?
  • Breech seals
  • Transfer ports
  • Air transfer port test
  • I could go on!
  • Today’s point

Computer crash

My main computer died suddenly Monday morning, so I had to scramble to get a new one and have the old data transferred. I’m working on Edith’s computer that has the same software but is set up differently in the user interfaces. So things have been a struggle this week. One big problem is transferring photos and videos from cameras. I can do it, but it takes 4 times as long.

More power

I was hoping to do the Teach me to shoot report on holding a 1911 pistol today, but the computer issue made that impossible. So I’m going to address a topic that seems to be coming up a lot these days — getting more power from an airgun. You know, comedian Tim Allen built his career around the premise that men always want more power from everything. And he took that to the extremes — showing just how ridiculous it can become. Like an episode on his television show, Tool Time, where he got into racing garden tractors with V8 engines installed. Like the Boss Hoss motorcycle, they are something to see, but you wouldn’t want to ride one very far!

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Beeman Double Barrel air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman Double Barrel air rifle
Beeman Double Barrel air rifle.

This report covers:

  • Gamo acquires Daisy
  • Beeman Double Barrel air rifle
  • Double barrel?
  • Description
  • Initial impressions
  • The rifle
  • Barrels
  • Stock
  • Metal finish and plastic
  • Sights
  • The manual
  • The trigger
  • Upcoming tests and challenges
  • Impression so far

Gamo acquires Daisy

First the news. Yesterday, July 5th, Gamo Outdoor SL announced the acquisition of Daisy Outdoor Products. “This is the beginning of a new chapter in Daisy’s history”, said Joe Murfin, Vice President of Public Relations. Indeed, it is. It will be interesting to watch this new association as it grows into a new entity.

Now, let’s look at an air rifle that’s unusual.

Beeman Double Barrel air rifle

Today I begin my review of the Beeman Double Barrel air rifle. Let me start by mentioning that’s not its real name. The Chinese owners of the Beeman company actually named this unique air rifle the Dual by Beeman. However, in light of the fact that there have been several rifles called the Beeman Dual Caliber air rifle over the past several years, the stage was set for mass confusion.

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Characteristics of a classic airgun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Airguns are easy to use
  • Airguns are quiet
  • Airguns cock easily
  • Airguns are accurate
  • Airguns have good sights
  • What about plastic?
  • Triggers
  • What have I missed?
  • Why is this in the history section?

I celebrate my victories quietly. One of them has been to expose the elements of classic airgun design, so people who need to know can understand what it takes to make something timeless and enduring. We all know that the airgun manufacturers are silent readers of this blog and its comments. Today I am dedicating this report to them — a compilation of design aspects that will ensure a classic airgun. I’ll tell you why at the end of the report.

Airguns are easy to use

Yes, there are people who only shoot airguns. Before I wrote this blog I had no idea there were so many of them, but there are. They are a sizable element of the shooting population and designers need to be aware of them. But their numbers are overwhelmed by the number of firearms shooters who also shoot airguns from time to time. And why do they do it? Because airguns are easy to shoot. I can pick up a Diana 27 and snap off 5 shots at targets of opportunity before you can pack your AR-15 with bipod and sniper scope into that oversized black tactical bag! And we both know the rifle isn’t all you need to go to the range. You load the car with stuff, while I carry my 6-pound breakbarrel in one hand, and a tin of pellets in my pocket.

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Teach me to shoot: Part 10

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9

This is the continuing fictional saga and guest report of a man teaching a woman to shoot. Today Jack starts teaching Jill’s friend, Jamell, how to shoot.

Our guest writer is reader, Jack Cooper. Take it away, Jack.

Teach me to shoot

by Jack Cooper

This report covers:

  • Getting started
  • Wants to hunt
  • Field trip
  • Watch the crowd
  • Etiquette lives!
  • High art
  • They do a deal — sort of
  • Diana the huntress
  • Big girl, big rifle
  • Next time at the range

I told you that I had promised Jill I would teach her friend, Jamell, how to shoot. Of course Jamell already knows how to shoot on several levels. She met Jill at a Babes with Bullets camp, where both of them took the Beginner Handgun course. So she not only knows how to shoot, she is also a recent graduate of one of the best training courses in the U.S. My job was to fill in the blanks that weren’t covered at the camp; subjects Jamell has never been formally taught.

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Webley Mark II Service: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service
Webley Mark II Service air rifle.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Eley Wasps
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Superpoints
  • What to do?
  • Barrel removal
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Other neat things

Before I begin today’s report, here is another reminder about the Texas Airgun Show, on Saturday, August 27 at the Arlington Sportsman Club. Find information here. And don’t forget the Pyramyd Air Cup, that’s held September 9-12 at the Tusco Rifle Club in Dennison, Ohio. I will be at both events, so come out and say hello. Now, let’s take a second look at the Webley Mark II Service air rifle.

There was a lot of interest in this rifle in the first part of the report. We will look at velocity today, and I’ll also show you things several readers asked about. This should be an interesting report, so grab your coffee and let’s get started.

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