Why can’t I shoot better ?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Why can’t I shoot better?
  • B-I-L speaks
  • Plateaus
  • What could make me advance?
  • Better equipment?
  • The end

This is a question I am asked from time to time. Why can’t I shoot better? Recently several readers asked the question and my brother-in-law, Bob, asked it privately. I told everyone I would address this issue, and today is the day.

Why can’t I shoot better?

This is a question that’s not unlike the one we all asked as children, namely “ Why can’t I grow any taller?” Of course today you recognize that you were growing all the time, but the progress was so slow it was impossible to see. Someone, probably your mom, may have marked your height from time to time with a pencil mark on the woodwork of a door frame. As a kid you didn’t think too much about that process, but as time passed you had to admit the marks kept going up.

read more


Daisy’s Red Ryder: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

Daisy Red Ryder
Daisy Red Ryder.

This report covers:

  • Installs quickly and easily
  • Base slants downward
  • Scope or dot sight?
  • Not a Red Ryder test
  • The test
  • Daisy Premium Grade BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Air Venturi steel BBs
  • Observations

Okay, I am shifting gears on this report. The first 3 reports were about my vintage Red Ryder — a Daisy model 111-40. But it wouldn’t accept the Brice scope base that I wanted to test for you. So Bill Brice sent me a new Daisy Red Ryder to test his base for you.

Pyramyd Air will be stocking this mount, so if you like what you see, you should be able to order one soon.

Installs quickly and easily

The scope base goes on the gun very quickly. Remove the rear sight elevator and then lift the sight and slip the mount base underneath. Use the wood screw that’s on the gun to attach the rear of the base.

read more


How to range-find with an adjustable parallax scope

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Why know the range?
  • First point
  • Focus — not rangefinding
  • Limitations
  • Temperature
  • What scale is on the adjustment?
  • Sidewheels
  • Scope magnification
  • The average airgunner
  • Do you need a range finding scope?

I’m writing this report for a new reader — Ovid. As soon as I replied to his request last week, another reader said he wanted to know how it worked, too, which tells me there are couple thousand silent readers with the same question. So, let’s learn how to determine ranges with a parallax adjusting scope.

Why know the range?

Airgunners need to know the range to the target because of the arched trajectory their pellets follow. Where centerfire cartridges may drop 9 inches over a distance of 250 yards, an airgun can do the same thing in 60 yards. And some competitions like field target demand that the pellet pass through a small hole without touching the sides of the hole, or the target will lock up and not fall. So, we are not talking inches — we are talking fractions of an inch! Therefore, knowing the trajectory of the one pellet you shoot at all distances and knowing the precise distance to your target is critical.

read more


Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Quackenbush Number 7
Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • 4.4mm lead balls
  • 4.55mm balls
  • Final comment on the trigger
  • The end

Today we test the accuracy of the Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun. I’m not expecting much from this gun, based on its light construction and age. But it surprised me in the velocity test we ran last Friday, so maybe I will be surprised yet again. I know you want a report of the 2016 Texas Airgun Show, and I will get to that tomorrow, so sit back and enjoy this oldie with me today.

The test

I shot the gun at 5 meters, using the UTG monopod as a rest. I shot from the seated position, so the gun was about as steady as it could be. However, as light as it is (2 lbs. 9.25 oz) and with an almost 9 lb. trigger pull, it is going to be a challenge to get off a shot without some movement of the gun. It’s probably much easier to shoot it offhand, though nowhere near as accurate.

read more


Benjamin Maximus: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

Benjamin Maximus
The Benjamin Maximus.

This report covers:

  • Texas Airgun Show
  • Pyramyd Air Cup
  • Am I done?
  • My thoughts
  • Readers’ thoughts
  • Crosman Premier Copper Magnum
  • Baracuda Match 4.53mm head
  • Does sorting help?
  • RWS Superdomes
  • JSB Exact 8.44-grain pellets
  • The trigger
  • Evaluation so far

Texas Airgun Show

The Texas Airgun Show is fast approaching! It’s held on Saturday, August 27 and opens to the public ($5 admission) at 9 a.m. Dealers and early buyers (cost for early buyers is one table — $30) can get in to set up at 6:30. Bring eye protection if you have it, because you have to wear it all the time you are outdoors. The hall is next to the skeet ranges and shot sometimes falls (like rain, with very little velocity) where people are.

AirForce Airguns has donated a Texan big bore in the winner’s choice of .35 or .45 caliber for the door prize, so anyone who buys an admission ticket is entered for the drawing. Airgun Depot is sponsoring the show and has donated one of their .40-caliber Badgers rifles for the raffle. Hatsan donated a Bull Boss PCP, Umarex USA donated a .22-caliber Octane, a $100 gift certificate, an S&W MP40 blowback pistol and 6 hats, Pyramyd Air donated a Benjamin Maximus rifle and a Zombie Slayer Paper Shooter, and American Airgunner donated 6 hats. Buy lots of raffle tickets and increase your odds at all these prizes that will be raffled from 10:30 until 1: 30.

read more


Schofield Number 3 BB revolver: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Schofield BB revolver
Schofield BB revolver.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • ASG Blaster BBs
  • Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs
  • H&N Smart Shot lead BBs
  • Center aim
  • What to make of all of this?
  • Evaluation

Today is accuracy day for the Schofield Number 3 BB revolver. Lots of interest in this one, so let’s get started.

The test

I shot from 5 meters. I was seated and the revolver was resting on the UTG monopod. I used a 6 o’clock hold for most of the targets and I shot 6 shots at each target.

ASG Blaster BBs

First up were ASG Blaster BBs. Six of them made a vertical group that measures 1.579-inches between centers. It’s a lot larger than I thought it would be.

Schofield BB revolver ASG target
Six ASG Blaster BBs made this 1.579-inch group at 5 meters.

Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs

Next I loaded 6 Air Venturi Copper-Plated steel BBs into the cartridge noses and shot them. Again, the hold was 6 o’clock on the bull. These BBs went low and a little to the left, making a 1.488-inch group.

read more


Air Venturi Air Bolt: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Venturi Air Bolts
Air Venturi Air Bolts turn a .50 caliber big bore rifle or shotgun into an air bow.

This report covers:

  • Like no other!
  • Another air bow?
  • Is the Air Bolt any good?
  • What I was told
  • We begin
  • Muzzle-loaded
  • Shot 1
  • 30 yards
  • Great air conservation
  • Evaluation

Today I start looking at the Air Bolt from Air Venturi. This product is a package of 6 arrows that sell for $120.00 at Pyramyd Air, and I know there will be lectures on the cost of crossbow arrows today. Because that’s what the Air Bolt is — a crossbow bolt.

Like no other!

HOWEVER — and this is the news today — with the Air Bolt, you don’t have to buy another gun. If you already own a .50 caliber big bore airgun — and hundreds, if not thousands of serious U.S. airgunners already do — there is nothing more to buy. You have everything you need to begun shooting.

read more