They overstepped the line!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

This report covers:

  • What “they” did
  • Rocky Mountain Arms Corporation
  • Young minds go astray
  • Bad ideas abound!
  • Percussion cap guns
  • What about cartridge primers?
  • Summary

What “they” did

The history of airguns is fascinating to those who enjoy applied creativity. But sometimes when creativity is carried too far it becomes a liability. And that’s the case with today’s guns.

Rocky Mountain Arms Corporation

In the 1970s the Rocky Mountain Arms Corporation (RMAC) created a little gun for kids who wanted to shoot with their fathers. They referred to it as a .22 caliber, though it shot a number 4 buckshot that is really 0.24 inches rather than 0.223 inches in diameter. That didn’t matter because a 5-pound bag number 4 buckshot was available for a few dollars. For that you got thousands of shots.  Nobody worried about the size of the ball that much.

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FWB 300/150 disassembly instructions: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Today’s report contains special instructions for the disassembly of a Feinwerkbau 150 air rifle — for those few places where it departs from the FWB 300 instructions presented in Parts 1 and 2. It was translated and written for us by reader CptKlotz.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

Over to you, CptKlotz.

This report covers:

  • Additional information for disassembling FWB 150 rifles
    Trigger blade
    Ratchet unit
    Powerplant disassembly — potential danger!
    Procedure

This article was originally published on the German co2air forums (www.co2air.de). It was created by the users Pellet (original text guide), Paramags (additional information and FWB150 details ) and boerni (photos and forum post). They kindly gave me permission to translate their guide so people who can’t read German can use it as well. The original forum post can be found here.

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Air Venturi Tech Force M8: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Ari Venturi M8
Air Venturi M8 is very much like the Bronco.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The assumptions
    Premier lites
    Artillery hold
    Deep seated pellets
    Artillery hold
    The test
    Air Arms Falcons
    Directly on the sandbag
    Conclusions

Today we begin looking at the accuracy of the Tech Force M8 pellet rifle — a breakbarrel that we have discovered is very similar to the discontinued Air Venturi Bronco. Because it is so similar, we can take what we already know about the Bronco and apply it to this rifle — the results will probably be the same, or similar, though we have to watch for anomalies that could crop up.

Today is accuracy day — the first of two such days we will have with the M8. Today I’m shooting the rifle at 10 meters. That gets me on the target and gives a chance for the rifle and scope to settle down.

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BSA Supersport SE: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

BSA Supersport SE air rifle BSA Supersport SE

This report covers:

• RWS Superdome pellets
• JSB Exact RS pellets
• 8-32X Aeon Classic rifle scope
• Baracuda Match pellets, 5.53mm heads
• Different hold
• Evaluation of the rifle

Today, I’m shooting the .22-caliber BSA Supersport SE at 25 yards. I’m also testing the Aeon 8-32X50 Classic rifle scope with a trajectory reticle mounted in the Diana Bullseye recoil-reducing scope mount. Those 2 products will each get their own separate reports because today I’m concentrating on just the rifle.

In Part 3, I shot the rifle at 10 meters using the open sights that came with it. From that test, I selected a couple pellets to try today. But first, I want to show you a picture of the Aeon 8-32X50 scope mounted on the rifle, because in the last report I mentioned how short it is for this range of power.

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AirForce Texan big bore rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Texan big bore
The Texan from AirForce Airguns is a .458 big bore to be reckoned with. The 4x scope and bipod are options.

This report covers:

• Starting to test accuracy
• Scope swap
• On my own
• The best bullet
• Yada, yada, yada…
• At 100 yards
• Summary

When I ended the last report, I said there was a lot more to say about the new AirForce Texan and that I would get to it in the next report. Today, I’m going to talk about accuracy, which all of you want to know about. This will be a complete report; but even when I finish, there will still be more to tell. I have a special report coming about the effectiveness of big bore air rifles on big game in general, and I’m sure that one will evoke a lot of discussion.

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Colt Single Action Army BB gun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Colt Single Action Army BB revolver
The new Colt Single Action Army BB revolver is gorgeous!

This report covers:

• Tin cans?
• On to accuracy
• Umarex BBs
• Daisy BBs
• Crosman Copperhead BBs
• Hornady Black Diamond BBs
• Avanti Precision Ground Shot
• 4.4mm lead balls
• Summary

Tin cans?
Today, we’ll test the accuracy of the new Colt Single Action Army BB revolver. But before we get to that, there was a question from a blog reader named Claude about this revolver penetrating a steel food can. I said it couldn’t, but I secretly promised myself to test it first thing. Well, I was wrong. Steel food cans are thinner today, and this revolver can indeed pass through both sides! I shot the can at about 18 inches.

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RWS Diana 45: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Diana 45 left
Diana 45 is a large breakbarrel spring rifle.

This report covers:

• Repairs first
• Accuracy test parameters
• Premier lite pellets
• Air Arms Falcon pellets
• RWS Superdome pellets
• More pellets?
• How the rifle behaved
• Next

Today, we’ll begin to learn about the accuracy of the Diana 45 we’re testing. This rifle belongs to a friend of mine, and I want you to remember that the ultimate goal of this series is to completely tune this vintage air rifle to remove as much of the vibration as possible. We aren’t looking for greater power. We want smooth operation. What we’re doing today is just baseline testing.

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