Umarex Throttle air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Throttle
Umarex Throttle offers a lot for a little money.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Long time
  • Good trigger
  • Nice scope
  • Handling
  • The test
  • JSB Exact RS
  • What to do?
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Something different
  • RWS Superpoint
  • What now?
  • Conclusion

I’m back. I said at the end of Part 3 that I wanted to test the Umarex Throttle air rifle at 25 yards and today is the day.

Long time

It’s been a long time since I shot the Throttle, so I had to experience it all over again. First I note that the rifle cocks easier (28 pounds) than the 16-18 foot-pounds of muzzle energy would normally require. Umarex engineers got that part right.

Good trigger

I do like the trigger. Though it feels heavier than I’m used to, it breaks crisply, which helps accuracy.

Nice scope

I found that I like the scope, although I had to adjust it for today’s test. Once the parallax was set I discovered that the eyepiece was way off for me. The crosshairs appeared double on the target. I unscrewed the eyepiece at least a quarter-inch and everything sharpened up. My aiming was precise from that point on. For a scope that comes in a bundled deal, this one is surprisingly nice.

read more


Answering GrandpaDan — the biggest blog ever!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

    • GrandpaDan
    • BB’s response
    • What can you do?
    • Velocity is not at fault
    • GrandpaDan continues
    • Staying with the brand name doesn’t always work
    • Back to GrandpaDan
    • BB responds
    • The solution?
    • GrandpaDan concludes
    • BB sums up
    • Geo791
    • BB’s last word to GrandpaDan

    You readers tell me you like it when I write about general topics. So, when I get a question from a reader, I try to answer him in this blog. Today’s report will be the biggest report I’ve ever written, because I’m going to include much of what the new reader has asked as the lead-in to my answers. I’ve also included another reader’s comment from the experimentation he has done to achieve more-or-less what the new reader is asking.

    Here we go.

    The new reader’s handle is GrandpaDan, and he signed-into the blog this past Monday. Here is his situation.

    GrandpaDan

    “I’ve been reading and researching airguns for a while. This grows out of frustration with my Gamo Hunter 440 in .22 cal. that I bought about 4 years ago to kill chipmunks. That year we were overrun with the critters. I had been running a trap-and-release program and had trapped 21 chipmunks when the state game folk told me that was illegal. Oh well, I’ll just get a spring gun and shoot the pests.

    read more


Blowguns — the first airguns

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This is a guest blog from reader Hiveseeker. Today he reflects on the very first airguns — blowguns

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Now over to you, Hiveseeker.

Blowguns — the first airguns
by Hiveseeker

This report covers:

  • Airgun history
  • Blowgun calibers
  • Blowgun length
  • Popular .40 and .50 caliber darts
  • Popular .625 caliber darts
  • A word about blowgun hunting
  • Blowgun accessories
  • Make a blowgun target
  • How to blow that blowgun
  • Aiming a blowgun
  • For further study

lead photo
Modern-day blowguns come in .40, .50, and .625 caliber. Note the accessory dart quivers.

Airgun history

Here at the Airgun Academy blog B.B. has done a great job of sharing his passion and knowledge of airgun history, deepening our appreciation for our favorite sport. Today we’ll be traveling even further into the past as we delve back to the earliest roots of airgun history — the blowgun! B.B. took us there in 2007 when he wrote about The blowgun Where it all began, and observed that “As airgun collectors become more interested in their hobby, they eventually start acquiring blowguns.”

read more


Umarex Throttle air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Throttle
Umarex Throttle offers a lot for a little money.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • StopShox
  • Mount the scope
  • Accuracy
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Crosman Premiers again
  • JSB RS
  • Some other pellets
  • What next?

Today we look at the accuracy of the new Umarex Throttle air rifle. You may remember that I was very pleased with the performance of this new air rifle, up to this point. If it is also accurate, we have a winner.

StopShox

This rifle contains the StopShox mechanism that takes the sting out of shooting a gas spring. That unit works, because the Throttle definitely does not sting.

Mount the scope

The Throttle came with a 3-9X32 scope and 2-piece scope rings. The Throttle has a Picatinny rail they call the LockDown mounting system. It’s mounted to the top of the spring tube, and the rings are Weaver, so mounting the scope was fast and easy. The optics are clear and this scope has AO (adjustable parallax) that adjusts down to 10 yards.

read more


Firearm pellet adaptor: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Must load from the front of the cartridge
  • Sizing pellets to fit into the mouth of the case
  • How deep is the pellet seated?
  • A lot of “stuff” to support the adaptor
  • The stuff
  • The test
  • Benchrest
  • Surprise!
  • Shot 4
  • Discussion

Today we look at the accuracy of the firearm pellet adaptor. This is what we have been interested in all along. In Part 2 we saw that the velocity was stable when the pellets were loaded deep inside the neck of the adaptor, but not when they sat proud. That generated several questions that I will address before I get to the test. Everything I do today was done with the .22-caliber JSB Exact Jumbo pellet.

Must load from the front of the cartridge

Several readers wondered what might happen if the pellet was pushed in from the rear of the cartridge, rather than loaded from the front. The dents at the base of the cartridge case shoulders prevent that from happening, though I expect you could push a pellet through if you used a lot of force.

read more


Wax on — wax off!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Some basic truths
  • What am I saying?
  • What many do wrong
  • Ready, fire, aim!
  • Back to airgunners
  • Use the sights!
  • The end

Homework assignment. You need to watch the movie, “Karate Kid.” The moral of the movie is to slow down, concentrate and focus power! At least that’s what Mr. Miyagi tells Daniel-san.

Another phrase from WWII is, “Straighten up and fly right.” It pretty much means the same thing.

I almost titled this report, “Why I shoot muzzle loaders,” but I thought that would turn off the very people I was reaching out to today.

Some basic truths

1. When shooting lead bullets in a big borte airgun, always size the bullet at least one-thousandth of an inch larger than the bore. This is the principal reason 9mm big bore airguns are not accurate when shot with 9mm bullets (0.356-inches) but tighten right up when shot with 0.357-inch and even 0.358-inch bullets.

read more


Diana model AR8: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana AR-8
Diana AR8 N-TEC air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

  • New Diana scope base
  • Droop?
  • The test
  • Baracuda Match 5.53mm heads
  • Firing behavior
  • Better artillery hold
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • RWS Superdome
  • Notice all three groups
  • Conclusions

This report has taken a long time to write. I wanted to test the Diana AR8 from 25 yards with open sights, but my sighting eye has degraded to the point that I can’t do that. The AR8 is also very hard to cock and it would be too much trouble to shoot it left-handed, so I scoped it for today’s test. I used a 3-12X40 UTG scope that’s no longer made.

New Diana scope base

As you may remember, Diana changed the installed scope bases on all their spring rifles a few years ago, negating the aftermarket bases that were designed for them in the past by UTG. There are still hundreds of thousands of those vintage rifles that those bases fit, but the new base on all their spring rifles will not allow the old droop-compensating UTG mount base to be installed.
The problem is — Diana’s base on the rifle doesn’t accept a scope ring set very well. I wanted to use a base that accepted Picatinney scope rings, because of the heavy recoil of the AR8, but Diana doesn’t provide a ring like that, nor would it fit their base if they did.

read more