Umarex Throttle air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Throttle
Umarex Throttle offers a lot for a little money.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • StopShox
  • Mount the scope
  • Accuracy
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Crosman Premiers again
  • JSB RS
  • Some other pellets
  • What next?

Today we look at the accuracy of the new Umarex Throttle air rifle. You may remember that I was very pleased with the performance of this new air rifle, up to this point. If it is also accurate, we have a winner.

StopShox

This rifle contains the StopShox mechanism that takes the sting out of shooting a gas spring. That unit works, because the Throttle definitely does not sting.

Mount the scope

The Throttle came with a 3-9X32 scope and 2-piece scope rings. The Throttle has a Picatinny rail they call the LockDown mounting system. It’s mounted to the top of the spring tube, and the rings are Weaver, so mounting the scope was fast and easy. The optics are clear and this scope has AO (adjustable parallax) that adjusts down to 10 yards.

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Firearm pellet adaptor: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Must load from the front of the cartridge
  • Sizing pellets to fit into the mouth of the case
  • How deep is the pellet seated?
  • A lot of “stuff” to support the adaptor
  • The stuff
  • The test
  • Benchrest
  • Surprise!
  • Shot 4
  • Discussion

Today we look at the accuracy of the firearm pellet adaptor. This is what we have been interested in all along. In Part 2 we saw that the velocity was stable when the pellets were loaded deep inside the neck of the adaptor, but not when they sat proud. That generated several questions that I will address before I get to the test. Everything I do today was done with the .22-caliber JSB Exact Jumbo pellet.

Must load from the front of the cartridge

Several readers wondered what might happen if the pellet was pushed in from the rear of the cartridge, rather than loaded from the front. The dents at the base of the cartridge case shoulders prevent that from happening, though I expect you could push a pellet through if you used a lot of force.

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Wax on — wax off!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Some basic truths
  • What am I saying?
  • What many do wrong
  • Ready, fire, aim!
  • Back to airgunners
  • Use the sights!
  • The end

Homework assignment. You need to watch the movie, “Karate Kid.” The moral of the movie is to slow down, concentrate and focus power! At least that’s what Mr. Miyagi tells Daniel-san.

Another phrase from WWII is, “Straighten up and fly right.” It pretty much means the same thing.

I almost titled this report, “Why I shoot muzzle loaders,” but I thought that would turn off the very people I was reaching out to today.

Some basic truths

1. When shooting lead bullets in a big borte airgun, always size the bullet at least one-thousandth of an inch larger than the bore. This is the principal reason 9mm big bore airguns are not accurate when shot with 9mm bullets (0.356-inches) but tighten right up when shot with 0.357-inch and even 0.358-inch bullets.

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Diana model AR8: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana AR-8
Diana AR8 N-TEC air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

  • New Diana scope base
  • Droop?
  • The test
  • Baracuda Match 5.53mm heads
  • Firing behavior
  • Better artillery hold
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • RWS Superdome
  • Notice all three groups
  • Conclusions

This report has taken a long time to write. I wanted to test the Diana AR8 from 25 yards with open sights, but my sighting eye has degraded to the point that I can’t do that. The AR8 is also very hard to cock and it would be too much trouble to shoot it left-handed, so I scoped it for today’s test. I used a 3-12X40 UTG scope that’s no longer made.

New Diana scope base

As you may remember, Diana changed the installed scope bases on all their spring rifles a few years ago, negating the aftermarket bases that were designed for them in the past by UTG. There are still hundreds of thousands of those vintage rifles that those bases fit, but the new base on all their spring rifles will not allow the old droop-compensating UTG mount base to be installed.
The problem is — Diana’s base on the rifle doesn’t accept a scope ring set very well. I wanted to use a base that accepted Picatinney scope rings, because of the heavy recoil of the AR8, but Diana doesn’t provide a ring like that, nor would it fit their base if they did.

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Why can’t I shoot better ?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Why can’t I shoot better?
  • B-I-L speaks
  • Plateaus
  • What could make me advance?
  • Better equipment?
  • The end

This is a question I am asked from time to time. Why can’t I shoot better? Recently several readers asked the question and my brother-in-law, Bob, asked it privately. I told everyone I would address this issue, and today is the day.

Why can’t I shoot better?

This is a question that’s not unlike the one we all asked as children, namely “ Why can’t I grow any taller?” Of course today you recognize that you were growing all the time, but the progress was so slow it was impossible to see. Someone, probably your mom, may have marked your height from time to time with a pencil mark on the woodwork of a door frame. As a kid you didn’t think too much about that process, but as time passed you had to admit the marks kept going up.

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Teach me to shoot: Part 12

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10
Part 11

This is the continuing fictional saga and guest report of a man teaching a woman to shoot. Today I will be taking over. I’m going to show you how to hold a 1911 pistol one-handed for the best accuracy. This was requested by reader levans, but several of you own 1911s, so this should be of interest to many.

This report covers:

  • Learned from a champion
  • Distinguished Pistol Shot badge
  • Elmer Keith knew something
  • It’s all in the hold and the trigger action
  • The thumb controls the recoil
  • Lock the elbow
  • Cantilever the shooting arm
  • Other pistols?

Learned from a champion

Readers who have been with us for years know this story, but for the benefit of the newer readers, here is how I learned this technique. I was running a pistol range for my cavalry squadron in the Army and the squadron commander, LTC Bonsall, arrived on range in his jeep. I had never seen a lieutenant colonel at a small arms range before. I’m sure they went, just never when I was running the range. The colonel introduced himself, because I hadn’t met him yet — he was that new. Then, he asked to qualify. Well, sure, he could qualify. It was his range, after all!

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Teach me to shoot: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This is the next installment of a fictional guest report about a man teaching a woman how to shoot. Jack Cooper is teaching a woman he met in a bible study group to shoot because she felt she could learn better with airguns. Jill has learned rapidly, which you can read about in Parts 1 and 2, linked above. Today she puts what she has learned to the test. Take it away, Jack.

Teach me to shoot

by Jack Cooper

This report covers:

  • Getting cocky
  • The first review
  • Unsafe moves!
  • What has she learned so far?
  • More to learn
  • A new sight picture
  • Which pistol?

Jill and I had our second training session with the Daisy 499 the next evening, and she shot nothing below a 48 out of 50 possible points in 7 attempts. One of our readers asked if she is doing this offhand, and I am pleased to report that she is. That’s what is so astonishing.

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