Pellet adaptors in firearms: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Revolver kits
  • Benefits
  • Performance
  • Long guns
  • Adaptors
  • Dedicated long guns
  • Zimmerstutzens
  • Airguns are better

Here’s a bad idea that refuses to go away — shooting pellets in firearms. This takes several forms. I will do a quick look at the most popular ones in this report.

Revolver kits

One kit fits revolvers. It has an insert barrel that fits into the barrel. It’s fastened into a larger-caliber gun like a .357 Magnum by some sort of friction fit.

The one I owned was made for a Smith & Wesson 586/686 revolver with a 6-inch barrel. Yes, they are that specific. The pellets fit into cartridge-shaped modules that accept a primer at their other end. They are then loaded into the cylinder and are fired either single action (cocking the hammer first) or double action (just pulling the trigger). The kit I had came with primitive tools to extract and reload the primers after firing.

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Mosin Nagant M1944 BB gun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Mosin Nagant M1944 BB gun
Mosin Nagant M1944 BB gun.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Daisy Premium Grade BBs
  • Adjusted the sights
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • Evaluation

Today we look at the accuracy of the Mosin Nagant M1944 BB gun. This test is almost a dare, because several readers goaded me into reviewing this BB gun. Reader Thedavemyster said he noted that some owners were saying it is almost as accurate as the Daisy 499. which we all know is the most accurate BB gun in the world. If this one comes anywhere close to that, it will be a winner.

The test

I removed the sling for better control of the airgun on the UTG Monopod. I shot seated from 5 meters using the monopod rest. The open sights are clear and sharp and very easy to see when the target is illuminated by a 500-watt lamp.

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Air Venturi Air Bolt: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Venturi Air Bolts
Air Venturi Air Bolts turn a .50 caliber big bore into an air bow.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Broadhead performance
  • How fast do broadheads fly?
  • Can a broadhead be stopped?
  • How to load broadheads
  • Robin Hood!
  • What about the Wing Shot?
  • Wing Shot accuracy
  • Summary

This is a continuation of the report I started last week. Although it’s titled Part 3, think of it as Part 2, because I’m finishing things I didn’t tell you last week.

Broadhead performance

We looked at the performance of the Air Bolt from Air Venturi with target points. Now let’s see what they do with broadheads. Last week I showed you those lethal points that open as they penetrate the target. When I was researching this report I heard all sorts of claims for them. First, that they penetrate so deeply that no arrow stop in the world can stop one — they will pass right through. Also, they are heavier and will drop a couple inches more as they fly. Also, they are less accurate because they have those razor blades hanging out in the breeze as they fly. And finally they are so sharp that there is no way to attach them to an arrow without a wrench.

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Crosman 600 air pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 600
Crosman 600 CO2 pellet pistol.

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • First up — Crosman Premiers
  • Hobbys are next
  • Adjusted the sights
  • JSB Exact RS pellets
  • Where does that leave us?
  • Conclusion

tom at bench

Me shooting a Crosman 600 CO2 pellet pistol at the Pyramyd Air Cup. Photo courtesy of Bryan Lever.

Today is accuracy day for the Crosman 600 semiautomatic pellet pistol. Before I get to that, however, let me tell you about my experience with one at the Pyramyd Air Cup a few weeks ago. Bryan Lever brought one for me to try and we were virtually alone on the range while the competition was ongoing. We both got to shoot as much as we wanted.

Bryan’s 600 is much like mine except it had a knob on the safety switch that I had never seen before. It turns out this knob is supposed to be there, but it’s one of the first things to fall off. It does make operating the safety a lot easier because you can both feel and see where it is.

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BSA Meteor Mark I: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSA Meteor
BSA Meteor Mark I.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Scope base
  • Breech lockup
  • Spend the money!
  • Velocity
  • Hobbys
  • RWS Superpoint
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Conclusions

I learned a lot from the comments to Part 1 of this report. Apparently a lot of readers are fascinated by the BSA scope that came as an option. I was asked several questions about how it mounts to the rifle, so let’s start today by looking at that.

Scope base

BSA cut two large dovetails into the spring tube. Then they pressed two steel inserts into these dovetails to create two hard mounting points for the scope ‘rings.’ I put quotes about the word rings because they aren’t rings at all. They are built right into the plastic scope body and as such they cannot be moved. Neither can the scope base oj the rifle be moved. So BSA gives you three holes to adjust the scope’s eye relief.

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Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Quackenbush Number 7
Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Test 1 — 4.4mm copper-plated lead balls
  • Test 2 — Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • Test 3 — 4.55mm zimmerstutzen balls
  • BBs stay in
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Evaluation

Today is more for me than for all of you. Today I test the velocity of my Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun. If you read Part 1 you know that I only discovered this gun works while researching that report. Until then I thought it shot an odd size shot that I would have to source from an industrial supply house as a ball bearing. But it was made to shoot 0.175-inch lead BBs, so all I had to do was find some of them. Well, that isn’t easy, either. Fortunately I used to shoot zimmerstutzens and other odd ball-shooting airguns, so I have some oddball stuff laying around.

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Webley Mark II Service: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service
Webley Mark II Service air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Artillery hold?
  • RWS Hobbys
  • Shooting left-handed
  • Eley Wasps
  • The peep sight
  • One last group of Hobbys
  • Where to from here?

Today we start looking at the accuracy of the Webley Mark II Service air rifle. You will recall that my redneck breech seal fix got the rifle performing again. Whether or not it is up to full par is questionable, but at least it’s shooting okay.

I decided to begin with the sporting rear sight that’s attached to the barrel and then switch to the peep sight that flips up. Good thing I did, as you will learn in a moment.

The test

I shot the rifle off a rest from 10 meters. Though reader Dom warned me that the Webley is an area-fire airgun and not a precision one, I thought it would probably be on paper at this distance. Fortunately for me and the garage wall, it was!

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