Reality check

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Update on Edith
Edith was transferred back to the ICU because her oxygen level had dropped low. Her doctor ordered X-rays and a CAT scan to try to find out what is happening. The Guillain Barre Syndrome has been fully treated now, but here is the deal. The myelin sheaths on her nerves has been destroyed and hasn’t regenerated yet. With GBS it will do so, but it takes time. Imagine a complex electronic device that’s submerged in water all the time. Then the insulation get’s stripped off the wires. That’s what has happened to Edith.

They found large blood clots in her veins in the lungs, so she was fitted with a mask to force pure O2 into her lungs. They are worried that the clots may grow and obstruct her blood flow, so they put a clot filter in her inferior vena cava. And they are giving her blood thinners through the IV to keep the clots from growing. The next 48 hours are very critical to her.

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TAC-4.5 BB gun: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

TAC 4.5 BB gun
The TAC-4.5 from ASG is a 21-shot BB repeater.

This report covers:

  • ASG Blaster BBs
  • Daisy BBs
  • Air Venturi BBs — silver
  • Air Venturi BB container is the best!
  • Air Venturi BBs — copper
  • ASG velocity for the TAC-4.5
  • This BB gun is quiet!
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Overall evaluation

Today is the velocity test of the TAC 4.5 BB gun. This airgun operates on a single 12-gram CO2 cartridge that is housed in the grip. In Part one I showed you how the spring-loaded backstrap flips back to reveal where the cartridge goes.

I noted there was very little gas escape when I pierced the cartridge, and the gun seems very quiet. But a hole in the backer cardboard told me the gun definitely shot.

ASG Blaster BBs

I’m going to get right to it today. The first BB I’ll test is ASG’s Blaster steel BB. I measured 5 of them, and the diameter ranged from 0.171 inches to 0.173 inches. One of the five was out of round by a thousandth of an inch. The other four were regular. This BB is on the smaller side of what is normal for BBs today (0.171 to 0.173 inches), and the variation in size is greater than I have seen. We will see what that means, as far as accuracy is concerned.

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What do you do when…?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Scopes move ALL the time
  • The secret to scope movement
  • Scopes move for other reasons
  • The secret to parallax elimination
  • The secret to parallax elimination
  • Open sights are rarely sighted-in
  • The secret to hitting what you shoot at
  • Magazine feeding problems
  • Making bad triggers good
  • Live with it

Today I’m going to talk about some things that never come up as full topics, but do get discussed peripherally a lot! I’m referring to the little things you encounter at the shooting range — the quirks that all guns, both firearms and airguns, bring to the table.

Scopes move ALL the time

I was at the range a couple weeks ago with Bob, my brother-in-law. We were sighting-in his AR-15 and also shooting a Mauser that Otho had. Bob mentioned once that even though he was shooting from a rest, he could never get Otho’s scope to stop moving.

Hollywood has taught the non-shooting public that images seen through rifle scopes are completely still and in sharp focus. Shooters know different. No matter who you are the image in the scope will always move. Just your heartbeat is enough to make it move, though people don’t appreciate that until they become shooters. It’s one reason some people prefer iron sights. The image still moves with them, but you can’t detect it nearly as easily.

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Air Venturi Tech Force M8: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Ari Venturi M8
Air Venturi M8 is very much like the Bronco.

This report covers:

  • Comparison
  • Stock
  • Powerplant
  • Double trigger blade
  • What is it?

Here is an alert to everyone who missed getting an Air Venturi Bronco. From what I see so far, just having taken the .177 caliber Air Venturi Tech Force M8 out of the box and shooting it a couple times, this rifle is as good as the Bronco. For some of you it is even better, as you will learn today.

Comparison

The M8 is practically identical to the Bronco. Both rifles are 40 inches long and weigh 6.5 lbs. The M8 stock has a slightly longer pull of 13 inches, to the Bronco’s 12-1/2 or 12-3/4 inches. Both rifles are said to cock with 18 lbs. of effort, which puts them into the comfortable range. The Bronco came with adjustable open sights, while the M8 has no sights. Both rifles have the 2-bladed 2-stage trigger that uses the first blade to take up stage one of the pull.

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Field Target Team USA’s test of the JSB FT Premium pellets: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Before we start, here is an update on Edith. Sunday was the last application of the medicine for Guillain Barre Syndrome. She was still in pain and only able to move her legs a very little, plus she had not eaten much in the past 5 days, so she’s weak. I got her to eat some fruit, which she enjoyed.  I hope they have diagnosed her condition correctly and that she responds to the cure. I guess we now have to wait and see.

Apparently you readers let me miss a day of the blog last week. It was written, but just not published, because I am so new to doing the admin stuff. Therefore, I have an extra blog for this week, which I really needed.

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Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver
The new Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver comes in both silver and black. I’m testing a silver gun.

Part 1
Part 2

Before I start the report, here is an update on Edith. This thing she may have/probably has is called Guillian Barre Syndrome. It does in hours what MS does in years. It is very rare — only one case in 100,000 they say. But it is curable, where MS isn’t. Or at least if the disease doesn’t go away, it stops bothering the patient.

Edith has been having waves of pain and weakness attacks, followed by short recoveries. Last evening she was in a lot of pain and could not get out of bed. But her doctor is optimistic that the treatment she is undergoing will work and she’ll have a full recovery. I took her computer to the hospital, but she wasn’t able to look at it last night. I will see her again today and hopefully she’ll be much better and able to read all you have written.

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Best of B.B.: My first airgun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

I had to take Edith to the emergency room yesterday and when I returned home there were only 4 hours left to write and publish today’s blog. She is not well, and we don’t know what it is yet. In fact, we’re going to another ER tonight at the advice of the wife of Pyramyd Air’s president (who is a physician). She was surprised that the first hospital never tested Edith for an obvious illness. I will keep you updated as we learn more.

Today I am rerunning an old blog from the past. This one was published on November 11, 2005. Enjoy!

I’ll tell you about my first airgun, then I want YOU to tell me about YOURS!
A Benjamin 107 pistol


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