Hatsan Gladius .177 long: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Hatsan Gladius
Hatsan Gladius Long.

This report covers:

  • Quiet
  • A couple things
  • High Power
  • Baracuda Match 4.50mm
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • Low power
  • Medium power setting 4
  • What to make of this?
  • Trigger pull
  • Accuracy
  • Evaluation

We’re back with the Hatsan Gladius .177 long today for the velocity test. Hatsan advertises that this rifle gives up to 90 shots per fill. You may get that many, but not on full power. This is a hunting rifle and you want hunting rifle accuracy. For me that means keeping all your shots inside an inch which is the size of the kill zone on the smaller game the Gladius is designed to take. Now, when you throw distance into the equation things get confused very fast, so my way to simplify things is to say that 50 yards is the distance at which I would like to see one-inch groups.

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MeoPro HD 80 Spotting Scope: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Meopta MeoPro HD 80
MeoPro HD 80 spotting scope from Meopta.

This report covers:

  • Quality you can see
  • Interview with the GM
  • History
  • Iron curtain falls
  • Military and industrial applications
  • The best optics you never heard of
  • First test
  • Test at 100 yards
  • 200-yard test
  • Second 200-yard test
  • Evaluation so far

Sometimes I know how a report is going to go before I write the first word. This is such a time.

Quality you can see

I knew from looking through the Meopta binoculars at the 2016 SHOT Shot that this MeoPro HD 80 spotting scope was going to be good. And it is. How good will be the subject of this report.

Interview with the GM

I was able to arrange a phone interview with Meopta USA’s general manager and chief operating officer, Reinhard Seipp. He told me that he is an optical engineer, so he not only knows his company’s business profile — he knows the products and the technology that’s behind them. That is rare to find today. So many companies have businesspeople at the helm who haven’t much of a clue about the technical side of what their firm does. What I’m saying is when you want to talk about airguns, it’s nice to talk to an airgunner.

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Webley Senior straight grip air pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Webley Senior straight grip
Webley Senior straight grip air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Design
  • Piston ring
  • Power
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Quirky

Today we start looking at a Webley Senior straight grip air pistol. This model was made from 1930 to 1935, according to the Blue Book of Airguns, 11th edition. There were two versions — a first version that has a trigger adjustment screw sticking out the front of the triggerguard and the second version, which is the one I have. I bought the pistol at a small gun show in Kentucky in the 1970s, when I was assigned to Fort Knox. I paid $75, which was considered a lot at the time, but I owned the first edition of the Airgun Digest and I knew what this pistol was. It’s worth a lot more today.

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Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

Crosman 101

Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic.

This report covers:

  • Different test
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Peep sight adjustment
  • Back to Premiers
  • JSB Exact RS
  • H&N Baracuda Match — 5.53mm head
  • Eley Wasps
  • RWS Superpoints
  • Overall evaluation

Today we look at the accuracy of the .22-caliber Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic. Although I have owned it for many years, it isn’t an airgun I shoot a lot, so this will be as interesting to me as it is to you.

Different test

Because the rifle is so difficult to both cock and load, I shot 5-shot groups today instead of the usual 10. All shooting was done off a sandbag rest at 10 meters. I did find the tiny peep hole a bit challenging to use with my recovering eye, but it was possible. I had the target attached to the backstiop on its side, so all the bulls appear sideways. Let’s see how the rifle did.

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FWB P44 10-meter target pistol: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB P44
FWB P44 target pistol is Tom Gaylord’s dream airgun!

FWB P44 10-meter target pistol: Part 1
FWB P44 10-meter target pistol: Part 2
FWB P44 10-meter target pistol: Part 3
Morini 162MI Part 1
Morini 162MI Part 2
Morini 162MI Part 3

This report covers:

  • A test of 2 target pistols
  • P44 benefits
  • Today’s test
  • H&N Finale Match Pistol
  • Sig Sauer Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Vogel pellets
  • Qiang Yuan Olympic pellets
  • Qiang Yuan Match pellets
  • RWS R10 Pistol
  • Results

Today we start testing the accuracy of the FWB P44 10-meter target pistol. Normally I test accuracy one time and then either end the series or move on to other things, but in this report I want to show you something different. I’ll start doing that today. I spent time adjusting the pistol to fit me perfectly in Part 3, and now I will take some time discovering which pellet is the best for the gun. So there will be several accuracy sessions before I finish this series.

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Boxes — keep ‘em?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Love my job
  • Boxes everywhere
  • Good or bad?
  • Time adds value
  • Designing a box
  • Keep or not?

Love my job

I may have mentioned this before — I love my job! I get to handle and shoot airguns every day of my life, and I get to tell others about it. What’s not to like? Well, there may be one thing. Boxes.

My house is taken over by boxes. There isn’t a room in the house that doesn’t have at least one gun and one gun box. What’s that? You think my bathrooms are free? Think again. I bet I have the only guest bathroom in the world with an 1822 French horse pistol resting in the vanity drawer!

1822 French pistol
1822 French pistol. Guest bathroom, left side of vanity, second drawer down.

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Hatsan Gladius .177 long: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Gladius
Hatsan Gladius Long.

This report covers:

  • The rifle
  • Synthetic and metal
  • Repeater
  • Magazines
  • 200 bar
  • Trigger
  • Ergonomics
  • Rails
  • Compressed air
  • Impressions so far

Today I start looking at the Hatsan Gladius .177 long. This is a large, powerful precharged pneumatic (PCP) hunting rifle that has a very high rating from satisfied customers. I’m testing the rifle in .177 caliber, but it also comes in .22 and .25. There is also a short Gladius in all three calibers that retails for $50 less than the long ones.

The rifle

The long Gladius is large, weighing in at 10.6 lbs. without a scope. The Gladius is a bullpup design that doesn’t take full advantage of the bullpup style — at least in the long version. I asked for the long rifle so I could test the maximum power (in the selected caliber) and shot count. With a PCP the length of the barrel determines the power to a large extent. Now, you may argue that a powerful air rifle like the Gladius should be tested in the larger calibers that can generate the maximum energy, but others want to see the fastest velocity with the flattest trajectory. Whichever way I go, some will be dissatisfied. And, no, I’m not planning to test this rifle in the other calibers. I’ll let the published numbers speak for themselves. The last big Hatsan PCP I tested was a BT65 QE rifle in .25 caliber. A test of a .177 Hatsan PCP was past due.

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