Airline Travel with your Airguns: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Today’s report is the second and final part of a guest blog from Pyramyd Air’s own Tyler Patner. Readers know Tyler from his experiences shooting field target, plus a recent guest blog he wrote about an Air Arms S510 Ultimate Sporter.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Now, take it away, Tyler.

This report covers:

  • Attitude is everything
  • Weapons and checked bag fees– airline policies vary
  • Big airports versus small airports
  • Here’s how it works
  • You’ve reached your destination — now what?
  • It pays to insure it!
  • See you in the friendly skies!
  • Wish us luck!

In Part 1, we covered some best practices for protecting your gun and the basics of what you need to get through a TSA check. Today we will discuss the process of checking a gun step by step.

Attitude is everything
This goes for more than just flying, obviously, but it’s very applicable here. When you go to the counter to check in, the calmer you are, the better. It’s best to remember that these people work for the airline and are going to do what they can to get you and your gun processed properly and get you onto your flight. They don’t want any trouble and typically are very friendly and helpful. Now, the TSA agents are typically not as nice but simple cooperation is all they ask. If you cooperate with them, they will make sure your gun (and you) get to where you need to be.

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Calling flyers — the marksman’s goal

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Introduction
  • What is a called flyer?
  • Airguns are unique
  • How are flyers called?
  • I became a better shooter
  • The skill transfers

Introduction

Today’s report was at the request of reader Chris USA. He responded to a comment made by reader Matt61,

On “called flyers”, what is that exactly? Do you call it (before) the pellet hits ? or,…is it a choice you make (after) the shot hits ? Follow through and keeping the eye on the target, after the shot,…I find that most of the time that I know (before) the pellet hits that I messed up. It’s an instinct, but one I am still working on.

Do you call a “flyer” after or before the shot hits ? If before,…you better be pretty darn quick about it !

The conversation went on to question how it was possible to call a flyer that left the airgun in a few milliseconds. Do humans really have reaction times that fast? Not really, but reaction time has nothing to do with calling flyers.

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The rise of the BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • The first BB gun
  • Plymouth Iron Windmill Co.
  • The BB becomes air rifle shot
  • Quality control problems
  • You’ll shoot your eye out
  • World War II
  • After the war

The first BB gun

This is a comprehensive report of the early history of the BB gun. The first successful BB gun is thought to be the Markham. It was made in 1886 in Plymouth, Michigan by the Markham Air Rifle Company. The gun was mostly wood with just a few metal parts where they were absolutely needed — such as the mainspring, trigger, barrel, barrel hinge and other assorted small parts. It looked a little like a gun overall, but the shape was fatter all around because of the wooden parts.

Markham BB gun
Markham BB gun was made of wood with a few metal parts. This is a later 1888 model, but the early guns looked similar.

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Who was Edith Gaylord?: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Edie
Edith Gaylord — 1948-2015

This report covers:

  • Introduction
  • Silver spoon days
  • Exiled — twice!
  • Out of Germany
  • Mukden
  • Leaving Mukden — thanks to an American hero!
  • Shanghai
  • America
  • Health
  • Tomboy
  • Alternative medicine

Introduction

I was asked by several readers to write this report, but I would have written it anyway eventually. Because Edith Gaylord was a remarkable woman.

For starters, Edith was her middle name. Her first name was Inga — named after the aunt who sponsored her family so they could immigrate from China, where she was born in 1948. Yes, I said China! Inga Edith Gaylord was born in Shanghai, China in a Catholic convent that had been closed, due to the civil war that was raging across that country. Edith’s family lived during a time and under conditions that some younger Americans refuse to believe ever existed.

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FWB 300/150 disassembly instructions: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Today’s report contains special instructions for the disassembly of a Feinwerkbau 150 air rifle — for those few places where it departs from the FWB 300 instructions presented in Parts 1 and 2. It was translated and written for us by reader CptKlotz.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

Over to you, CptKlotz.

This report covers:

  • Additional information for disassembling FWB 150 rifles
    Trigger blade
    Ratchet unit
    Powerplant disassembly — potential danger!
    Procedure

This article was originally published on the German co2air forums (www.co2air.de). It was created by the users Pellet (original text guide), Paramags (additional information and FWB150 details ) and boerni (photos and forum post). They kindly gave me permission to translate their guide so people who can’t read German can use it as well. The original forum post can be found here.

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Air Venturi Tech Force M8: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Ari Venturi M8
Air Venturi M8 is very much like the Bronco.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The assumptions
    Premier lites
    Artillery hold
    Deep seated pellets
    Artillery hold
    The test
    Air Arms Falcons
    Directly on the sandbag
    Conclusions

Today we begin looking at the accuracy of the Tech Force M8 pellet rifle — a breakbarrel that we have discovered is very similar to the discontinued Air Venturi Bronco. Because it is so similar, we can take what we already know about the Bronco and apply it to this rifle — the results will probably be the same, or similar, though we have to watch for anomalies that could crop up.

Today is accuracy day — the first of two such days we will have with the M8. Today I’m shooting the rifle at 10 meters. That gets me on the target and gives a chance for the rifle and scope to settle down.

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Aeon 8-32 AO scope with trajectory reticle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Aeon 8-32X50 scope
Aeon 8-32X50 AO scope with trajectory reticle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • A long story
    One little problem
    At the range
    Good testbed
    The test
    The results
    Comments on the scope
    Next time

This report on the Aeon 8-32 AO scope with trajectory reticle was a long time coming. So long many of you won’t remember why I’m even writing it. The answer begins with a long story.

A long story

In the first part of this report I mentioned a shift in the point of impact that might have been caused by me changing the magnification while I shot the string, or it may have been caused by a Bullseye ZR 1-piece scope mount that I was testing. We never got that sorted out in that report and I said I would come back to it.

My plan was always to use my Talon SS at 50 yards for both tests –

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