Gletcher NGT Nagant CO2 BB revolver: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Nagant CO2 BB revolver
Gletcher Nagant CO2 BB revolver

This report covers:

  • Unique design
  • Unique firearm cartridge
  • Loading gate
  • Power
  • It disassembles!
  • Cult status

Today, we’ll start our look at Gletcher’s Nagant CO2 BB revolver. This lookalike BB gun comes in both black and silver finishes, with a $30 premium for the silver. It’s a 7-shot solid-frame revolver whose prototype firearm (the Russian 1895 Nagant) was designed in the 19th century — so there are some differences from today’s standard handguns.

Unique design

For starters, the Nagant revolver pushes the cylinder forward to mate with the rear of the barrel for less gas loss at firing. The BB gun replica only simulates that with a spring-loaded barrel that moves in and out as the cylinder turns — but don’t fret. That function on the firearm made the double-action trigger-pull very heavy! The BB-gun trigger is light.

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2015 Findlay airgun show: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • You won’t believe it!
  • At my table
  • Old stuff
  • And toys
  • And on and on…

You won’t believe it!

I was walking the aisles, looking at all the guns and trying to see everything. On the floor at one table there was a standing rack with what appeared to be a Bugelspanner. I showed you a Bugelspanner several years ago. I’ve seen hundreds of Bugelspanners over the past couple decades I’ve been going to airgun shows, but this one looked a little different. So, I inquired about it — and got the best story of the whole show.

For starters, it wasn’t a Bugelspanner (triggerguard-cocker) at all. It was a Heblespanner (side-winding crank-cocker), similar in function to my David Lurch gallery dart gun, though quite unlike it at the same time. Let’s take a look.

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Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana N-TEC 340 Classic
Diana 340 N-TEC Classic

This report covers:

  • What is the 340 N-TEC Classic?
  • Gas-spring advantages and disadvantages
  • The rifle
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Shooting impressions
  • Overall impression

Let’s begin our look at Diana’s gas-spring guns. Specifically, we’re testing the Diana 340 N-TEC Classic in .177 caliber. The serial number of the rifle I’m testing is 01583666.

I’m very cautious when testing spring rifles that have gas springs, because dozens of past tests have made me skeptical over the years. The claims for smooth shooting almost never pan out. The claims for accuracy are often inflated. The cocking effort is often played down when I find it to be a major influence in how easy it is to operate the gun.

I’ve seen fewer than 10 air rifles with gas springs that I could recommend to others. So, as I look at this rifle, I’ll be looking from the vantage point of a lot of past experience.

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2015 Findlay airgun show: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • The show begins
  • Grab ‘em when you see ‘em
  • Something for everyone
  • Hot show
  • New book coming
  • Look, but don’t touch!
  • In the aisles
  • Pellets!
  • More to come

Intro sign

The show begins

It was good to see the old gang, again, at this year’s Findlay airgun show. Findlay is a show that combines the old with the new, and you never know what will walk in the door. I sat at Dennis Quackenbush’s table, so I’ll begin there.

Dennis usually doesn’t have big bore guns to sell at the show, because he’s busy filling orders all the time. But at this show, he had 3 of them — one .458 and two .308s. These were guns with extra-long barrels that nobody had ordered, so Dennis could sell them without pushing anyone back on his list. All 3 sold in the first 42 minutes after the doors opened at 9 a.m., and one was sold while a second customer was on his phone trying to decide whether or not to buy it. Before his call was finished, the gun sold. Folks, if you see something you like at an airgun show, buy it. And if you think you want to buy it, never set it down until the deal is made.

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World’s best pellet trap

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is a guest blog from reader Rod about an economical and yet very effective pellet trap he created.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

Over to you, Rod.

This report covers:

  • Humble beginnings
  • Silent running, Gen 1
  • A better way
  • Maintenance
  • What will it stop?

If you shoot indoors or need a backyard-friendly way to shoot your airgun, then you’ve probably pondered the best way to stop a pellet. Well, I think I’ve found the cheapest, safest and quietest way to do just that, hands down. Don’t believe me? Read on.

Editor’s note:

  1. Do not shoot a firearm into the trap described in this report. While Rod has tested it with some powerful firearms, I would not recommend it at this time. I believe a lot of additional testing needs to be done before it can be pronounced ready for firearms.
  2. Rod shot directly into the center of the trap. Shooting at an angle may have the unexpected consequence of fully penetrating the box and coming out the other side.
  3. Do not shoot arrows or bolts into the trap. They could deflect and unexpectedly come out the side of the box, and you won’t know how much further they’ll travel.
  4. Lower-powered projectiles may not actually penetrate the box and could bounce back.
  5. Always wear safety glasses and stand at sufficient distances to avoid rebounds.
  6. BBs — both airsoft and steel — may not penetrate the box and could easily bounce back a considerable distance.

target box
What do you get when you fill a cardboard box with a towel and some rubber mulch?

Humble beginnings

In the beginning…there was a brick wall. I have a 30-yard run down the side of my house that ends at my backyard. It’s a nice place to shoot, but no one wants to shoot into a wall. You’ll mess up the wall! Oh, and BBs bounce back. Ouch! Still, always remember — “Know your target, and what’s behind it.”

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Interesting gun designs: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • M1 Carbine
  • Investment casting
  • The Swedish Luger
  • Weak steel alloy
  • No criticism intended
  • Airguns are next

This is Part 1 because there is are additional parts planned. I have wanted to write this report for many years, which will come out as the story unfolds.

Mention interesting gun design to anyone 60 years and younger and sooner or later the AR-15/M16 will enter into the discussion. They’ll call it the Mattel-o-Matic and other derogatory terms. It deserves much of that derision, not because of the gun’s design, but because of the unsuccessful way in which it was launched. It was tested in just a cursory way and then quickly modified and shoved out the door to satisfy political pressure. It was proven (field tested) in battle, where tens of thousands of soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines paid a very high price for the shortcomings of the initial design. In the half-century since that time the design has evolved into something robust, reliable and very adaptive.

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RWS Diana 45: Part 9

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8

RWS Diana 45 air rifle
Diana 45 is a large breakbarrel spring rifle.

This report covers:

  • First shot at 12 feet
  • Firing behavior
  • At 25 yards
  • First group
  • Second group
  • Velocity retest
  • Overall evaluation

Today, I’m testing the tuned Diana 45 at 25 yards. This time, I’ll use a scope. I mounted an obsolete CenterPoint 3-9X40AO scope on the rifle. Because this is a vintage Diana rifle, which is always a drooper, I used a UTG drooper scope base. The one I used was a prototype that was left from when I was testing different base angles for Leapers. I selected one with a very slight droop of a couple degrees — less than what you can buy from Pyramyd Air.

First shot at 12 feet

I always sight in close to the target, so I know that I’m on when I move back to 25 yards. I was so close that the target was blurry in the scope with the parallax set as close as it would go.

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