Reality check

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Update on Edith
Edith was transferred back to the ICU because her oxygen level had dropped low. Her doctor ordered X-rays and a CAT scan to try to find out what is happening. The Guillain Barre Syndrome has been fully treated now, but here is the deal. The myelin sheaths on her nerves has been destroyed and hasn’t regenerated yet. With GBS it will do so, but it takes time. Imagine a complex electronic device that’s submerged in water all the time. Then the insulation get’s stripped off the wires. That’s what has happened to Edith.

They found large blood clots in her veins in the lungs, so she was fitted with a mask to force pure O2 into her lungs. They are worried that the clots may grow and obstruct her blood flow, so they put a clot filter in her inferior vena cava. And they are giving her blood thinners through the IV to keep the clots from growing. The next 48 hours are very critical to her.

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What do you do when…?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Scopes move ALL the time
  • The secret to scope movement
  • Scopes move for other reasons
  • The secret to parallax elimination
  • The secret to parallax elimination
  • Open sights are rarely sighted-in
  • The secret to hitting what you shoot at
  • Magazine feeding problems
  • Making bad triggers good
  • Live with it

Today I’m going to talk about some things that never come up as full topics, but do get discussed peripherally a lot! I’m referring to the little things you encounter at the shooting range — the quirks that all guns, both firearms and airguns, bring to the table.

Scopes move ALL the time

I was at the range a couple weeks ago with Bob, my brother-in-law. We were sighting-in his AR-15 and also shooting a Mauser that Otho had. Bob mentioned once that even though he was shooting from a rest, he could never get Otho’s scope to stop moving.

Hollywood has taught the non-shooting public that images seen through rifle scopes are completely still and in sharp focus. Shooters know different. No matter who you are the image in the scope will always move. Just your heartbeat is enough to make it move, though people don’t appreciate that until they become shooters. It’s one reason some people prefer iron sights. The image still moves with them, but you can’t detect it nearly as easily.

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All guns are not accurate

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Could it be?
• Presumption
• The test target
• The Emperor’s New Clothes
• Behind the curtain
• The point

This report is for my wife, Edith. She has suggested it many times in the past few years. Today, I’ll try to address it.

Edith tells me that when she worked at a major sporting goods catalog sales company years ago, she was shocked by some of the questions their call center got. The most shocking was when someone would call and say they had just purchased a certain model of firearm and would the call center please tell them what ammunition it used? This didn’t happen just one time — it happened often enough that it made an impression on her.

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The great pellet comparison test: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

• Test results
• Best bargain?
• The rest of the pellets
• Gamo Silent Cat pellets
• What’s next?

Today, we’ll look at the test I presented last Friday and see if we can make some sense of the results. As you remember, this test was to see how premium pellets performed compared to bargain pellets when all were shot from an air rifle of known accuracy. I used my tuned Beeman R8, and there was some discussion about that, as well.

Kevin told us that the R8 I have was based on an older Weihrauch model that’s no longer made and it differs from the current HW 50S that can be bought today. From that discussion, we learned that several of you have either received HW 50S rifles recently, or placed an order and are awaiting their arrival. There was some discussion about which was better — old or new — but I should point out that my rifle has been tuned and any new rifle would have to be tuned to match it.

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The great pellet comparison test: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

• Test structure
• Discount store pellets
• Commence shootin’
• Uh, oh!
• What’s next?

Today, we’ll begin the test I’ve been thinking about for so many years. Namely, how do bargain pellets sold in discount and sporting goods stores compare to premium pellets when shot from airguns that are accurate? I know we all harbor secret feelings on this subject, and today I’ll start a little test to see how those feelings turn out in the real world.

In no way is the test I’m about to show you conclusive. There isn’t enough data for that. All it does, if anything, is point out the possibilities that exist for all these pellets when they’re used under the test conditions. Run a second test, and the results will be different. BUT — and this is the very heart of what I’m doing in this test — if my supposition is correct and premium pellets do perform better than bargain pellets, then we might see something worth considering here.

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The great pellet comparison test: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

• Test structure
• Crosman Competition wadcutter pellets
• H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets
• Daisy Precision Max pellets
• RWS R10 Heavy Match pellets
• The results
• Final comment

This is the rest of the 10-meter pellet comparison test, and today the differences are greater than they were in the first half of the test. Today, I am shooting a Diana model 72 recoilless target rifle that’s made on the Diana model 6 target pistol action. It shouldn’t be quite as accurate as the Crosman Challenger PCP I used in the first part of the test, but it’s roughly equivalent to a Daisy 853.

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The great pellet comparison test: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

• Test structure
• The pellets
• The test — starting with Crosman pellets
• H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets
• Daisy Precision Max pellets
• RWS R10 Heavy pellets
• The results

A lot to cover today. Let’s get started. Remember what I’m doing is testing the accuracy of bargain pellets that can be bought at discount stores and sporting goods stores against premium pellets that are usually purchased online.

Test structure
I found out of the batch of pellets I bought that there were 2 different wadcutter pellets to test today and there are 2 good premium pellets for the gun I’m shooting. That means a total of 4 pellets will be shot, so I decided to shoot one 5-shot group, followed by one 10-shot group with the same pellet at 10 meters. The rifle was rested on a sandbag. Since there are 60 shots in this test with each rifle, I decided to shoot only one rifle at a time. Otherwise, I’ll tire and the later targets may not be representative.

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