BSF S70 air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSF S70
BSF S70 rifle is the father of several famous Weirauch models.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Today’s the day
  • Oiled the piston seal
  • RWS Hobby
  • Crosman Premier 7.9-grain
  • What’s up?
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Today’s the day

Today we find out how honest that Freimark is on my BSF S70 rifle. If you don’t know what Freimark is, read Part 1.

The Freimark is a German airgun mark that denotes a gun that does not exceed 7.5 joules power at the muzzle. That’s 5.53 foot-pounds. That would be a 7-grain RWS Hobby pellet moving 596 f.p.s. That will be our line in the sand.

From my experience with the BSF line, the S55/60/70/80 rifles (same powerplant in all of them) are above 7.5 joules all the time. That doesn’t mean there can’t be some that were made below that level, if German law allows. UK law states that if a model of an airgun can produce over 12 foot-pounds, then ievery one of them must be accompanied by a Firearms Certificate (FAC). They do not allow lower-powered versions of the same model gun to avoid that requirement. In other words, once a certain model needs an FAC, all of that same model need an FAC, regardless of what power they generate. But like I said, I don’t know how the German law reads.

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AirForce International Orion PCP air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Orion

The Orion PCP repeater from AirForce International.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • UTG Bubble Leveler scope
  • The test
  • Zero
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Trigger is spongy
  • Loading the magazine
  • H&N Baracuda Match 5.53mm heads
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Evaluation so far

Today we start looking at the accuracy of the AirForce International Orion air rifle. Though I seldom compare airguns, we have discussed that this one is positioned against the Benjamin Marauder. This accuracy test should sharpen that focus.

UTG Bubble Leveler scope

The rifle needs a scope, so I mounted the best one I have — the UTG Bubble Leveler scope. This was the first time I looked through this scope since my cataracts were removed and — WOW! That bubble is bright, clear and apparent. Guys, if you’re having trouble seeing the bubble, schedule a visit with your eye doctor! The optics on this scope are the sharpest of any scope I own, and I cannot recommend it highly enough. This is a best buy and a world-beater!

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Air Venturi Rail Lock spring compressor: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Rail Lock compressor
The Air Venturil Rail Lock spring compressor is compact.

This report covers:

  • Attaches to the scope rail
  • Let’s look at the unit in detail
  • How shall I test it?
  • Developed for gas spring guns
  • Installation
  • The coolest feature
  • Quirks
  • The price

Today we start looking at a mainspring compressor that’s very different from any other. The Air Venturi Rail Lock spring compressor is a compact 1.5-pound unit that attaches to the scope rail of the gun being disassembled. The threaded rod is then pressed against the end cap of the rifle — whatever configuration that might take. From that point this compressor works the same as any other, but in the next few reports I will show you in detail, plus today we will look at its design very closely.

Attaches to the scope rail

Right off the bat you might be wondering if this unit will fit most spring-piston airguns. As long as they have a scope rail either cut into the spring tube or attached, it will work. There are a few vintage spring rifles and pistols that don’t have rails like the Haenel model 28 pistol and some Diana model 27 rifles, and this compressor won’t work without a rail. But the majority of spring rifles being sold today, plus a number of spring pistols, do have a scope rail. On them the compressor should work well.

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BSF S70 air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSF S70
BSF S70 rifle is the father of several famous Weirauch models.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • It’s here!
  • History
  • Related models
  • Whadda we got?
  • Trigger
  • Sights
  • Summary

It’s here!

I told you about this BSF S70 rifle a couple weeks ago. I thought I didn’t win it in the online auction, but in fact, I did.

I have tested an S70 for you in the past. So, what’s so special about this one? Well, the truth is, that other S70 had some problems. First, it had no rear sight — just an optional peep that was sold by Air Rifle Headquarters and Beeman in the 1970s and ’80s. Next, it was very powerful. Though it carried the German Freimark that is put on all airguns of less than 7.5 Joules (5.53 foot-pounds), that rifle was producing over 12 foot-pounds. Either someone had been inside, or something funny was going on with the Freimark.

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AirForce International Orion PCP air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

AirForce International Orion
The Orion PCP repeater from AirForce International.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Where to start
  • Magazine height
  • Load the mag
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Firing behavior and sound
  • We learn more
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Loading
  • Trigger pull
  • Power adjustability
  • Discussion

Where to start

Today we test the velocity of the AirForce International Orion. Many of you are new to precharged pneumatics (PCP), so let me show you how I select which pellets to test when I don’t know the airgun. I start by looking at the advertised velocity, which for this rifle in .22 caliber is said to be around 800 f.p.s. Knowing how AirForce states things like this, that number is obtained with a reasonable lead pellet, so I will guess it was a Hobby, though they might have shot something heavier. Still my velocities are going to be between 700 and 800 f.p.s. and that tells me I should start with medium weight lead pellets — something in the 13 to 16-grain range. Once we know more we can go from there.

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Umarex Throttle air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Throttle
Umarex Throttle offers a lot for a little money.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • StopShox
  • Mount the scope
  • Accuracy
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Crosman Premiers again
  • JSB RS
  • Some other pellets
  • What next?

Today we look at the accuracy of the new Umarex Throttle air rifle. You may remember that I was very pleased with the performance of this new air rifle, up to this point. If it is also accurate, we have a winner.

StopShox

This rifle contains the StopShox mechanism that takes the sting out of shooting a gas spring. That unit works, because the Throttle definitely does not sting.

Mount the scope

The Throttle came with a 3-9X32 scope and 2-piece scope rings. The Throttle has a Picatinny rail they call the LockDown mounting system. It’s mounted to the top of the spring tube, and the rings are Weaver, so mounting the scope was fast and easy. The optics are clear and this scope has AO (adjustable parallax) that adjusts down to 10 yards.

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Do pressure vessels become unsafe over time?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Do pressure vessels become unsafe over time?
  • Operating pressure
  • Water leading to rust
  • Oxygen!
  • Danger through work-hardening
  • Last word

Today we have a safety issue to examine. Here is the question I got last week that spawned this report.

“Wasn’t sure how to reach you so using this venue. Was wondering about safety issue on pcps with regard to repeated pressurization over the years.Most pcps are newer and certainly built with margin of safety, but is it possible as these age and perhaps are handed down that they (the pressure vessel) can become unsafe? Read somewhere repeated pressurization can lead to eventual metal fatigue (in relation to high pressure vessels of non air rifle type). Thinking of future owners down the road. Thanks for all you do for all us airgun fans, read blog everyday.”

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