Webley Rebel multi-pump pneumatic: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Webley Rebel air rifle
Webley Rebel multi-pump pneumatic air rifle.

This report covers:

• Test design
• Velocity with Crosman Premier lite pellets
• Average with Crosman Premier lite pellets
• Velocity with RWS Hobby pellets
• Average with RWS Hobby pellets
• Velocity with H&N Baracuda Match pellets
• Average with H&N Baracuda Match pellets
• How fast?
• Pump effort
• Trigger-pull
• Made by Sharp
• Evaluation thus far

Today, we’ll look at the velocity of the Webley Rebel multi-pump pneumatic. As you read in Part 1, this rifle is advertised to get 963 f.p.s. in .177 on a full charge of 8 pumps. We’ll see if that’s the case.

read more


Webley Rebel multi-pump pneumatic: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Rebel air rifle Webley Rebel multi-pump pneumatic air rifle.

This report covers:

• History of the rifle
• Where is this rifle made?
• Description
• Blow-off valve
• Sights
• Trigger
• Feel of the rifle
• Some surprises

Today is a treat. If you’re new to airgunning and have fretted over all the wonderful vintage airguns you missed by coming into the hobby too late — today is for you. Because, today, there may still be a chance to get a fine “vintage” airgun. I know I’m a little to the party since this gun has been around a couple years, but I don’t want to let anymore time pass without a look.

read more


Air Venturi Tech Force M12 combo: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Air Ventury Tech Force M12 breakbarrel air rifle
The new Tech Force M12 breakbarrel is a new midrange springer from Air Venturi.

Today’s report is an important one, but it may be confusing until you hear the whole story. The last time I reported on this Tech Force M12 combo was back on November 19 of last year. A lot has happened with this rifle since then, and I’ve kept daily readers informed of what’s been going on, but it would have been easy to overlook and even easier to forget. So I’ll summarize.

The M12 I’m testing is a drooper, and I first had to solve that problem. Once I did, I noticed it threw fliers. I cleaned the barrel — but it got no better. I tightened all the screws — again, no change. I cleaned the barrel with JB Non-Embedding Bore Cleaning Compound — and still there was no improvement. Then, I shot the gun just to break it in — again, no change.

read more


Benjamin Titan GP air rifle with Nitro Piston: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Benjamin Titan with Nitro Piston has people talking.

Lots of interest in this air rifle — even from those who normally wouldn’t look twice at a gun of this kind. I guess it’s the low price that has folks talking.

Today is velocity day and a chance to become better acquainted with the test rifle. If you just found this blog, read Part 1 linked above. A short introduction is that Nitro Piston is the Crosman-trademarked name for a gas spring. Performance of a gas spring is a bit different than for a conventional coiled steel mainspring, though in the end both are spring-piston airguns. A gas spring uses compressed gas instead of a coiled steel spring to push the piston that compresses the air for each shot. Gas doesn’t suffer from being compressed for long periods, so you can leave a gun like this cocked for months and the power should not be affected. That isn’t recommended for reasons of safety, but it does allow hunters to carry their rifle cocked and loaded all day. Gas is also less sensitive to temperature changes, so gas springs retain their power better in extreme cold, where the lubricants in steel spring guns thicken and slow down the piston.

read more


Benjamin Titan GP air rifle with Nitro Piston: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Titan GP Nitro Piston breakbarrel air rifle

Benjamin Titan GP Nitro Piston breakbarrel puts .177 pellets out at up to 695 f.p.s.

This is a special report about an air rifle that can only be purchased directly from Crosman/Benjamin. It’s a Nitro Piston rifle, which is Crosman’s trademarked name for their gas spring, and this rifle has been limited to velocities under 695 f.p.s. The box says it’s a hunting air rifle, but I wouldn’t recommend it for that.

When one of our readers mentioned that this gun existed, I became excited because I liked the performance of the Crosman Titan GP (Lower Velocity). I did a complete report on the lower velocity Titan GP in .22 caliber. It was relatively easy to cock (for a gun with a gas spring) and had a wonderful firing behavior. It was also reasonably accurate. Those are all the things we look for in spring guns, so at the time I wondered if Crosman would ever release a .177 version of the rifle.

read more


Air Venturi Tech Force M12 combo: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Air Ventury Tech Force M12 breakbarrel air rifle
The new Tech Force M12 breakbarrel is a new midrange springer from Air Venturi.

I usually have a handle on the gun by the time Part 4 rolls around. But, today, I’m still stymied by the Tech Force M12 breakbarrel. I’ll tell you all I’ve done to make sure this rifle is on the beam; but when I tell you my results, I think you’ll see I’m not there yet.

Big droop!
I discovered in Part 3 that the M12 I’m testing is a big drooper. That means it shoots very low relative to where the scope is looking. For today’s test, I installed a B-Square adjustable scope mount that has a huge downward angle to bring the point of impact back up to the aim point. It worked well enough for the test, so I proceeded to shoot several different types of pellets — trying all kinds of hand holds and even resting the rifle directly on the sandbag.

read more


Benjamin Rogue ePCP: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Benjamin Rogue epcp big bore air rifle
The new Rogue is simpler, more tractable.

Think of this report as a bonus. I thought I was finished with the Rogue after Part 4, but then Seth Rowland — the man who organizes the Malvern, AR, airgun show and also provides big bore airgunners with swaged and cast lead bullets — contacted me, saying that he had been following the series. He told me he had a couple different bullet designs, some that he swages and can control the weight and length of the bullet. He wondered if I wanted to test the rifle with some more bullets — this time from a source other than Crosman/Benjamin. He had no idea whether any of the bullets would work in the rifle, but he did know they were large enough to fit the bore well.

read more