Benjamin Maximus: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

Benjamin Maximus
The Benjamin Maximus.

This report covers:

  • JSB pellets are very uniform!
  • At the range
  • First test — JSB Exact 10.34-grain dome
  • Head-sized pellets
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • JSB RS
  • Predator Polymag
  • Last group
  • Final report

Today I take the Benjamin Maximus back to the 50-yard range to test a couple final things. I said last time that I wanted to sort JSB Exact 8.44-grain domes with the Pelletgage, to get the most consistent size from the tin. Then I wanted to see if 10 of those sorted pellets would shoot better than the 0.913-inch group shot with unsorted pellets in the last test. Since readers were still suggesting other pellets to try, I also wanted to test a few of them — just to say that the Maximus was given a thorough test. I have done all of that and here are the results.

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Walther Parrus with wood stock: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Walther Parrus with wood stock

Part 1

This report covers:

  • First test
  • Second test
  • Third test
  • Back to JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Recoil and firing behavior
  • Evaluation

I’m moving right along on this report because there has been tremendous interest in the Walther Parrus with wood stock. Remember, the rifle I’m testing is in .22 caliber. Let’s get to it.

I’m going to change the test a little today. Normally I would report the velocity of three pellets — one lightweight, one medium weight and one heavyweight. But I encountered something during this test that allows me to show you one of the tricks of the trade. Actually it’s known to anyone who has spring gun experience and a chronograph.

First test

Let me show you the first 4 readings I got when shooting JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy pellets.

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Some frank talk about optics

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Dot sights — the good and the bad
  • The downside of dot sights
  • Dot sight summary
  • Compact scopes
  • Compact scope summary
  • High magnification
  • Summary of high magnification
  • Know the limitations of your equipment

Last week I asked for help determining how to test and evaluate a set of scope rings and a new scope. I got some good suggestions, but there was also a lot of discussion about optics that I would like to address today. I’m calling this report “Frank talk about optics” because this is what I would tell you if we were speaking privately. I’m not trying to sell you anything today. I just want you to consider some fundamentals when you select an optical sight.

Dot sights — the good and the bad

A dot sight shows an illuminated dot inside an optical tube that can be placed on a target of your choosing. Let’s start with the good stuff. I am preparing to demonstrate the Air Venturi Air Bolt system to the public at the 2016 Texas Airgun Show this coming Saturday, and I mounted a dot sight on the Sam Yang Dragon Claw 500cc rifle I’m using. I needed a sight that is quick to acquire the target and also very reliable, so I selected a red dot sight.

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Walther Parrus with wood stock: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Walther Parrus with wood stock
Walther Parrus with wood stock.

This report covers:

  • What’s new?
  • Why .22?
  • The rifle
  • Ambidextrous
  • Open sights
  • Scope rail
  • Adjustable trigger
  • One last feature
  • What is this?

Well, well. What do we have here? A breakbarrel spring-piston air rifle in .22 caliber that is supposed to send alloy pellets out the spout at 1,000 f.p.s. Does that mean that it could possibly shoot a normal lead pellet at 750-800 f.p.s.? If so, this is a breakbarrel air rifle with the power of the venerated Beeman R1 at half the cost.

What’s new?

I have been wanting to test the new Walther Parrus since seeing it at the 2016 SHOT Show. It is a more powerful version of the Terrus that I liked enough to buy, But is it different enough from the Terrus to call it a new airgun?

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Benjamin Maximus: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

Benjamin Maximus
The Benjamin Maximus.

This report covers:

  • Texas Airgun Show
  • Pyramyd Air Cup
  • Am I done?
  • My thoughts
  • Readers’ thoughts
  • Crosman Premier Copper Magnum
  • Baracuda Match 4.53mm head
  • Does sorting help?
  • RWS Superdomes
  • JSB Exact 8.44-grain pellets
  • The trigger
  • Evaluation so far

Texas Airgun Show

The Texas Airgun Show is fast approaching! It’s held on Saturday, August 27 and opens to the public ($5 admission) at 9 a.m. Dealers and early buyers (cost for early buyers is one table — $30) can get in to set up at 6:30. Bring eye protection if you have it, because you have to wear it all the time you are outdoors. The hall is next to the skeet ranges and shot sometimes falls (like rain, with very little velocity) where people are.

AirForce Airguns has donated a Texan big bore in the winner’s choice of .35 or .45 caliber for the door prize, so anyone who buys an admission ticket is entered for the drawing. Airgun Depot is sponsoring the show and has donated one of their .40-caliber Badgers rifles for the raffle. Hatsan donated a Bull Boss PCP, Umarex USA donated a .22-caliber Octane, a $100 gift certificate, an S&W MP40 blowback pistol and 6 hats, Pyramyd Air donated a Benjamin Maximus rifle and a Zombie Slayer Paper Shooter, and American Airgunner donated 6 hats. Buy lots of raffle tickets and increase your odds at all these prizes that will be raffled from 10:30 until 1: 30.

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Benjamin Maximus: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Benjamin Maximus
The Benjamin Maximus.

This report covers:

  • Another Meopta test coming
  • The test
  • Group 1 Crosman Premier 7.9-grains
  • Group 2 Crosman Premier Copper Magnums
  • Baracuda Match 4.53mm head
  • One final group
  • Air Venturi G6 hand pump
  • Am I done?

Today I take the Benjamin Maximus out to 50 yards. This is the test people have been waiting for, so let’s get right to it!

This test actually stretched over two range days, as I was kicked off the range on the first day after shooting the first group. The lawn had to be mowed. That takes 2 hours on the range I was on, so I left and took my target. The next range day came a week later, and I was able to complete today’s test.

I went to the 50-yard range on day two That range ios easier to mow — in case I got caught again.

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Air Venturi Air Bolt: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Venturi Air Bolts
Air Venturi Air Bolts turn a .50 caliber big bore rifle or shotgun into an air bow.

This report covers:

  • Like no other!
  • Another air bow?
  • Is the Air Bolt any good?
  • What I was told
  • We begin
  • Muzzle-loaded
  • Shot 1
  • 30 yards
  • Great air conservation
  • Evaluation

Today I start looking at the Air Bolt from Air Venturi. This product is a package of 6 arrows that sell for $120.00 at Pyramyd Air, and I know there will be lectures on the cost of crossbow arrows today. Because that’s what the Air Bolt is — a crossbow bolt.

Like no other!

HOWEVER — and this is the news today — with the Air Bolt, you don’t have to buy another gun. If you already own a .50 caliber big bore airgun — and hundreds, if not thousands of serious U.S. airgunners already do — there is nothing more to buy. You have everything you need to begun shooting.

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