Handguns — one eye or two?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Shoot like a girl!
  • The classic writers
  • The proper handgun sight picture
  • Spoiled sight picture
  • Experiment
  • It is a hand gun — singular
  • Shooting glasses to the rescue
  • It takes training
  • Is this for everybody?

This report was inspired by reader GunFun1, who said, “Does BB use one eye or two? Wow! Sounds like a blog topic to me.”

Shoot like a girl!

BB uses two eyes. He was taught to do so by an NRA firearm instructor, back in the 1950s. This was the first firearms instruction I ever received, and I was so enthusiastic that I would have barked like a chicken if the coaches said to. I knew nothing and was a sponge for information and training. In short, I learned to shoot like a girl!

I don’t say that to denigrate girls. I say it because most of the time when a girl learns to shoot, she comes in without any prior knowledge, expectations or personality problems (translate that as macho). She knows that she knows nothing, so if she is blessed with a good instructor, as I was, she absorbs the training and applies it immediately. That’s why girls usually outshoot boys — at least in the beginning. Some boys learn quickly to turn off their own machismo, and they are the ones that can go far. Of course talent helps both sexes without discrimination.

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Sig MPX: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig Sauer MPX sub-machinegun

Sig Sauer MPX.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • How to load the MPX
  • Orient the magazine by the magazine door
  • Removing the belt
  • Load the belt
  • Feeding the belt into the magazine
  • Sig Sauer Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • Crosman SSP pellets
  • Air Arms Falcon domes
  • Does firing fast lower the velocity?
  • Shot count
  • Trigger
  • Evaluation so far

Today we will look at the velocity of the MPX from Sig Sauer. I called it a sub-machinegun in Part 1 and a reader pointed out that subguns are full-auto. This one isn’t, so I erred in using that term. Sig doesn’t use it anywhere. They call it a semi-automatic air rifle, which is correct. I will use that term from this point on.

How to load the MPX

Today is the day we look at velocity, but before we do that, I told you I was going to rewrite the magazine loading instructions, to make them clearer. The manual doesn’t distinguish what is right and left in the instructions, yet they refer to the left and always feeding the magazine from a clockwise direction. Unless the owner knows how to orient the magazine, left, right and clockwise have no meaning.

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The influence of shooting galleries

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

  • The 15th century
  • Why?
  • Gallery guns were weak
  • Airguns and galleries
  • Different ammo
  • Repeaters
  • What killed the airgun?
  • Feltman

Shooting galleries have been a major influence in the shooting sports for close to a century and a half, and airguns have had their day in galleries. Reb, our most outspoken reader, once ran a traveling shooting gallery that featured the popular “Shoot out the Red Star” game. I’ll discuss that at the end of the report, but right now I’m going back to the beginning of shooting galleries.

The 15th century

And, who can really say when that was? We know from documents and from tapestries that shooting events were popular in Europe in the 1400s. But those were sporting events that came and went — they weren’t the galleries I am discussing today. The crossbows and guns that were used at those events belonged to the shooters. They were not rented by the gallery to the general public.

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How powerful were the big bore airguns of the past?: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord

Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

How powerful were the big bore airguns of the past?: Part 1

  • My knowledge base
  • Quackenbush Brigand
  • Air cane
  • Farco air shotgun
  • Splatology
  • Powerful enough to kill?
  • Conclusions

This report is for reader Zebra who asked me last week about the power of the antique big bore airguns. He said he read that some were used in battle and had the power to kill soldiers. I answered him and gave a link to the very first report of this airgun history series (Part 1, linked above). It was done way back on August 21, 2015 when this section was started. But I read that report and discovered that it really didn’t answer his question. I had explained how big bore airgun power was determined, but not how powerful the guns actually were. So I’m adding this Part 2 to get to the heart of the question.

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2016 SHOT Show: Day 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Shot Show Media Day
Shot Show Day 1
Shot Show Day 2

This report covers:

  • Not just airguns
  • Galahad
  • RWS USA (Umarex USA)
  • Beautiful breakbarrel
  • Walther Maximathor and Rotek
  • Brodax
  • AirForce Airguns
  • Crosman
  • More to come

Not just airguns

SHOT is a trade show, but that’s not all. It’s also a place where old friends get to meet and chat at least one time each year. Some of these folks only see each other at SHOT. I was walking up an aisle on day three and someone called my name. Now, I have visual agnosia, which means I can’t recognize faces. I even couldn’t recognize my wife unless I knew what clothes she was wearing that day. Sounds funny, but it’s not when you live it.

So this tall gentleman calls my name and steps up to shake my hand like we were old friends. After I saw his nametag (thank the Lord for them!), I knew that we were. It was Wes Richardson — the guy who developed the Walther Dominator field target rifle with me back in the 1990s. He had been seriously ill and it showed, but he was upright and taking nutrition, as they say, so the news was good. Meeting old friends is a big part of attending the SHOT Show.

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2016 SHOT Show: Day 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Shot Show Media Day
Shot Show Day 2
Shot Show Day 3

This report covers:

  • Best SHOT ever!
  • Crosman
  • Maximus
  • AirForce
  • Hatsan
  • Hercules
  • Hatsan regulator

Before we begin, I have a sad announcement. Ron Sauls, whom many readers knew and dealt with at Bryan and Associates, passed away yesterday. Ron will be remembered fondly by the airgun community for all he did to further our hobby.

Best SHOT ever!

Holy cow! I’ve covered SHOT Shows for the past 20 years, but this one tops them all. My day was so fantastic that I will only be able to give you an overview of it. I will return several times and give you more of what’s happening. Today, just the major things I saw on day one, and not all of those!

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Hammerli Trainer: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • European military trainers
  • K31
  • Trainer
  • Caliber
  • A major purchase!
  • Where we stand

I’m out at Media Day at the Range today. So tomorrow I’ll start showing you new stuff from the SHOT Show.

About three weeks ago I was cruising the auction website Gun Broker, looking at the listings of one of my favorite dealers. This guy sells oddball and eclectic firearms and, from time to time, airguns. I saw a Hammerli Trainer that was made for the bolt action K31 Schmidt Rubin rifle Switzerland used. I thought I recognized this trainer from Smith’s Standard Encyclopedia of Gas, Air and Spring Guns of the World, and, sure enough, I found it on pages 159-164.

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