They overstepped the line!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

This report covers:

  • What “they” did
  • Rocky Mountain Arms Corporation
  • Young minds go astray
  • Bad ideas abound!
  • Percussion cap guns
  • What about cartridge primers?
  • Summary

What “they” did

The history of airguns is fascinating to those who enjoy applied creativity. But sometimes when creativity is carried too far it becomes a liability. And that’s the case with today’s guns.

Rocky Mountain Arms Corporation

In the 1970s the Rocky Mountain Arms Corporation (RMAC) created a little gun for kids who wanted to shoot with their fathers. They referred to it as a .22 caliber, though it shot a number 4 buckshot that is really 0.24 inches rather than 0.223 inches in diameter. That didn’t matter because a 5-pound bag number 4 buckshot was available for a few dollars. For that you got thousands of shots.  Nobody worried about the size of the ball that much.

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Best of B.B.: My first airgun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

I had to take Edith to the emergency room yesterday and when I returned home there were only 4 hours left to write and publish today’s blog. She is not well, and we don’t know what it is yet. In fact, we’re going to another ER tonight at the advice of the wife of Pyramyd Air’s president (who is a physician). She was surprised that the first hospital never tested Edith for an obvious illness. I will keep you updated as we learn more.

Today I am rerunning an old blog from the past. This one was published on November 11, 2005. Enjoy!

I’ll tell you about my first airgun, then I want YOU to tell me about YOURS!
A Benjamin 107 pistol


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Air Venturi G6 hand pump: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Venturi hand pump
Air Venturi G6 hand pump.

This report covers:

  • Basic questions
  • Easy airguns to fill from a hand pump
  • Moderately easy airguns
  • PCPs that are harder to fill with hand pumps
  • PCPs you don’t want to fill with a hand pump!
  • Maintenance
  • Difficult to accept
  • Air Venturi G6
  • Test plug
  • Feel of the pump
  • Give me your thoughts

You want to come over to the dark side of airgunning (those who use precharged pneumatics), and you’re considering getting a hand pump to fill your airgun. This review will look at the Air Venturi G6 hand pump specifically; but before I dive into the description of this one pump, let me address some basic issues about hand pumps and precharged airguns in general.

Basic questions

The first question nearly everyone asks is how hard is it to fill an airgun with a hand pump, and should they consider going that route? My answer has always been another question. How much work are you prepared to do? If you have a riding lawnmower for a suburban yard of less than a half acre, maybe a pump is not for you. If you pay someone to mow your yard, it almost definitely isn’t right for you.

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Colt Single Action Army BB gun: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord

Writing as B.B. Pelletier

 

Colt Single Action Army BB revolver
The new Colt Single Action Army BB revolver is gorgeous!

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • It started as a conversation
  • Cartridges are the key
  • Use the same cartridges
  • The test
  • Ah-ha!
  • 25-foot test
  • Summary

It started as a conversation

A couple weeks ago, several readers had a discussion on the blog about shooting the Colt Single Action Army BB revolver with pellets. I didn’t read everything they said in detail, but the basic idea stayed with me for several days until I began to wonder, “Why not?” Back in 2013, I tested the Diana model 25 smoothbore pellet gun and discovered that it’s very accurate out to 10 meters — even though there’s no rifling to spin the pellet. Why wouldn’t this BB revolver also be accurate?

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Field Target Team USA’s test of the JSB FT Premium pellets: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is the first part of a guest blog from 4 authors: Ray Apelles, Hector Medina, Paul Plauche and Greg Sauve. They are all members of Field Target Team USA.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

Over to you, gentlemen.

This report covers:

  • Introduction
  • Physical Tests
  • Ballistic tests

Introduction

When JSB introduced their Exact Premium pellets at the 2015 SHOT Show, Field Target Team USA, through Hector’s connections, immediately agreed to conduct a test. It would be valuable to the team and to the airgunning community to have a solid body of results conducted by serious sportsmen. And, in essence, it’s a way for Team USA to give a little back to the community that so generously supports them. The test, therefore, had to be comprised of both PCP and spring-piston shooters. What better shooters than to use the four best-placed shooters in the World’s roster (a ranking of field target shooters).

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An air rifle for a new airgunner

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Accurate gun
  • Who you gonna call?
  • Maybe this isn’t for you
  • When airgunners mature
  • What brought this up?

Today, I want to talk about air rifles that I recommend for new airgunners. Young or old, these people all want the same thing, whether they realize it or not. They want an air rifle that’s fun to shoot. They want a springer for the simplicity, even if they don’t know what that means. And, they want a rifle that’s relatively accurate.

Accurate gun

Some of you probably think I’m an accuracy snob — that small groups are all that matter to me. It’s true — I do like to see small groups. But do you know what my favorite air rifle is? It’s a Diana model 27 in .22 caliber that probably can’t shoot better than three-quarters of an inch at 10 meters on its best day. For the new readers, that means putting 10 shots into a target 33 feet away, in a group that can be covered by an American quarter. I have air rifles that can do the same thing at 50 yards — 10 meters isn’t that far.

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Testing the .177 Pelletgage: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Before we start today’s blog, I wanted to remind you that we changed how to post a comment or reply to a comment on the blog. This was done mid-morning yesterday. If you’re having issues logging in or don’t know how to create an account, please email Edith (edith@pyramydair.com) for assistance.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Pelletgage
The .177-caliber Pelletgage. The holes are in a steel plate. A plastic plate above the gage plate helps guide the pellet head to the gage hole.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Pellet 1
  • Pellet 2
  • Pellet 3
  • Conclusions
  • Last comment

Today I’m taking the suggestion of blog reader Alan in Mich., who wondered if an air rifle with less of a pedigree than my TX200 Mark III would also benefit from the Pelletgage. I wondered the same thing, so I tested the Pelletgage using a Chinese B3-1 underlever rifle. Of all the air rifles around, this is the one without a pedigree.

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