Walther Parrus with wood stock: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Walther Parrus with wood stock
Walther Parrus with wood stock.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • 5-shot groups
  • The test
  • H&N Field Target Trophy
  • RWS Superdomes
  • JSB Exact 15.89 grain
  • Eley Wasp pellets
  • Baracuda Match 5.53mm heads
  • Last pellet — JSB 18.1 grain
  • Summary

Today I begin testing the accuracy of the .22-caliber Walther Parrus with wood stock. Since the rifle has open sights, I used today to sort through 6 candidate pellets for future tests.

5-shot groups

I only shot 5-shot groups today, because I’m not testing the ultimate accuracy of the rifle — just the potential for certain pellets to be accurate. Also I had to shoot left-handed because my right eye is acting up. I can’t see the target with my right eye when I look at the front sight. The good news is my retina specialist tells me that it’s time for me to get a pair of glasses. Looks like the eye is healed as far as it’s going to. At least with glasses I should be able to see things with both eyes again.

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Beeman Double Barrel air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Beeman Double Barrel air rifle
Beeman Double Barrel air rifle.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • The first pellet — Crosman Premier lites
  • Oh, my!
  • The best — Hobbys
  • Let’s consider this
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Discussion
  • I was wrong — sort of
  • Next

Hold on, kids, because today’s report will be the most exciting one you have read in a long time! Today I start looking at the accuracy of the Beeman Double Barrel air rifle. If you are sharp you caught the fact that I said I am starting testing accuracy today. That means there will be more tests to come! Let’s see how this rifle does!

The test

I shot the rifle off a rest at 10 meters. The first shot, however, was from just 12 feet, because I wanted to know whether both those pellets were really going to hit inside the pellet trap from 10 meters. I don’t need any more pellets in the garage drywall!

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Give me MORE POWER

By Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Computer crash
  • More power
  • Is all the power still there?
  • Breech seals
  • Transfer ports
  • Air transfer port test
  • I could go on!
  • Today’s point

Computer crash

My main computer died suddenly Monday morning, so I had to scramble to get a new one and have the old data transferred. I’m working on Edith’s computer that has the same software but is set up differently in the user interfaces. So things have been a struggle this week. One big problem is transferring photos and videos from cameras. I can do it, but it takes 4 times as long.

More power

I was hoping to do the Teach me to shoot report on holding a 1911 pistol today, but the computer issue made that impossible. So I’m going to address a topic that seems to be coming up a lot these days — getting more power from an airgun. You know, comedian Tim Allen built his career around the premise that men always want more power from everything. And he took that to the extremes — showing just how ridiculous it can become. Like an episode on his television show, Tool Time, where he got into racing garden tractors with V8 engines installed. Like the Boss Hoss motorcycle, they are something to see, but you wouldn’t want to ride one very far!

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Characteristics of a classic airgun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Airguns are easy to use
  • Airguns are quiet
  • Airguns cock easily
  • Airguns are accurate
  • Airguns have good sights
  • What about plastic?
  • Triggers
  • What have I missed?
  • Why is this in the history section?

I celebrate my victories quietly. One of them has been to expose the elements of classic airgun design, so people who need to know can understand what it takes to make something timeless and enduring. We all know that the airgun manufacturers are silent readers of this blog and its comments. Today I am dedicating this report to them — a compilation of design aspects that will ensure a classic airgun. I’ll tell you why at the end of the report.

Airguns are easy to use

Yes, there are people who only shoot airguns. Before I wrote this blog I had no idea there were so many of them, but there are. They are a sizable element of the shooting population and designers need to be aware of them. But their numbers are overwhelmed by the number of firearms shooters who also shoot airguns from time to time. And why do they do it? Because airguns are easy to shoot. I can pick up a Diana 27 and snap off 5 shots at targets of opportunity before you can pack your AR-15 with bipod and sniper scope into that oversized black tactical bag! And we both know the rifle isn’t all you need to go to the range. You load the car with stuff, while I carry my 6-pound breakbarrel in one hand, and a tin of pellets in my pocket.

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Webley Mark II Service: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service
Webley Mark II Service air rifle.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Eley Wasps
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Superpoints
  • What to do?
  • Barrel removal
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Other neat things

Before I begin today’s report, here is another reminder about the Texas Airgun Show, on Saturday, August 27 at the Arlington Sportsman Club. Find information here. And don’t forget the Pyramyd Air Cup, that’s held September 9-12 at the Tusco Rifle Club in Dennison, Ohio. I will be at both events, so come out and say hello. Now, let’s take a second look at the Webley Mark II Service air rifle.

There was a lot of interest in this rifle in the first part of the report. We will look at velocity today, and I’ll also show you things several readers asked about. This should be an interesting report, so grab your coffee and let’s get started.

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Hatsan 85 MOBU Sniper Combo: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan 85
Hatsan 85 MOBU Combo is an affordable breakbarrel with nice power.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Start at 10 meters
  • H&N Baracuda Match 4.53mm
  • H&N Baracuda Match 4.50mm
  • Crosman Premier 10.5-grains
  • JSB Exact Heavy 10.3-grain
  • 25 yards
  • Baracuda Match 4.53mm at 25 yards
  • JSB Exact Heavy at 25 yards
  • JSB Exact Heavy at 25 yards
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets at 25 yards
  • The feel of the gun
  • Summary

Today we begin looking at the accuracy of the Hatsan 85 Mossy Oak Break Up air rifle. We now know this is a powerful rifle that seems to have a smooth trigger. Let’s see if that means anything downrange.

Start at 10 meters

I started this test at 10 meters. Instead of 10-shot groups I fired 5-shot groups with each pellet. The only thing I’m trying to do is refine the sights and select the best pellets for further testing. All shooting today is off a rest (sandbag), using the classic artillery hold with the off hand touching the front of the triggerguard.

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Hatsan 85 MOBU Sniper Combo: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan 85
Hatsan 85 Mossy Oak Break Up rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Hatsan has potential
  • Hatsan is conservative
  • RWS Superdomes
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Crosman SSP pellets
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Scope base
  • Summary

Man, did I ever bump the beehive with this report! Part 1 certainly got a rise out of a lot of you. And you said what was on your mind. I bet you are the kind of guys who would tell me that my dog is ugly, too.

Okay, I’m rooting for the Hatsan 85 Mossy Oak Break Up rifle that I’m testing. Why? Because according to the advertised specs, it puts out a little more power than an RWS 34 (remember — we aren’t calling them Dianas any longer), yet sells in this combo package for 50 dollars less than just an RWS 34P, by itself. If this rifle is accurate, we have a potential world-beater on our hands.

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