Colt Single Action Army BB gun: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord

Writing as B.B. Pelletier

 

Colt Single Action Army BB revolver
The new Colt Single Action Army BB revolver is gorgeous!

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • It started as a conversation
  • Cartridges are the key
  • Use the same cartridges
  • The test
  • Ah-ha!
  • 25-foot test
  • Summary

It started as a conversation

A couple weeks ago, several readers had a discussion on the blog about shooting the Colt Single Action Army BB revolver with pellets. I didn’t read everything they said in detail, but the basic idea stayed with me for several days until I began to wonder, “Why not?” Back in 2013, I tested the Diana model 25 smoothbore pellet gun and discovered that it’s very accurate out to 10 meters — even though there’s no rifling to spin the pellet. Why wouldn’t this BB revolver also be accurate?

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Colt Single Action Army BB gun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Colt Single Action Army BB revolver
The new Colt Single Action Army BB revolver is gorgeous!

This report covers:

• Tin cans?
• On to accuracy
• Umarex BBs
• Daisy BBs
• Crosman Copperhead BBs
• Hornady Black Diamond BBs
• Avanti Precision Ground Shot
• 4.4mm lead balls
• Summary

Tin cans?
Today, we’ll test the accuracy of the new Colt Single Action Army BB revolver. But before we get to that, there was a question from a blog reader named Claude about this revolver penetrating a steel food can. I said it couldn’t, but I secretly promised myself to test it first thing. Well, I was wrong. Steel food cans are thinner today, and this revolver can indeed pass through both sides! I shot the can at about 18 inches.

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Colt Single Action Army BB gun: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Colt Single Action Army BB revolver
The new Colt Single Action Army BB revolver is gorgeous!

This report covers:

• The gun has a rear sight
• Kitchen-sink velocity test
• Daisy Premium Grade BBs
• Loading and unloading
• Umarex Precision Steel BBs
• Crosman Copperhead BBs
• Avanti Precision Ground Shot
• Lead balls
• Shot count

Well, it’s official. The Colt Single Action Army BB revolver I’m testing for you is a production model. The photos Pyramyd Air originally posted on their site were photos that Umarex sent them of a pre-production gun. All the blued guns will look like the one I’m testing. If you were concerned how your blued gun would look, it should look just like mine. By the time you read this blog, the images on Pyramyd Air’s site will have been updated.

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Colt Single Action Army BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Colt Single Action Army BB revolver
The new Colt Single Action Army BB revolver is gorgeous!

Colt Single Action Army BB revolver box
They even got the box right!

This report covers:

• Here it is
• Very realistic!
• Cartridge-fed
• Action is authentic
• Things that differ
• Overall — a good job!

Here it is
This is the surprise I wanted to show you last Friday. I was asked to hold off, but then the decision was made to let me run the blog today. The Colt Single Action Army BB revolver is here — or will be pretty soon. This is the airgun I’ve been waiting for since Wulf Pflaumer, one of the owners of Umarex, first told me about the impending arrival of the Walther Lever Action rifle. I was at his sister’s home in Maryland when he told me about the soon-to-arrive lever-action rifle. I was already a huge fan of several of his action pistols, so we had a great discussion about realistic airguns.

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What would B.B. shoot?

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Blog reader Kevin asked me this question recently, and I embraced it because I usually don’t even have time to think about which airgun I would prefer to shoot. There’s always another blog, a feature article and 5 other deadlines pressing on my time…so thinking like this is not a luxury. It’s a fantasy! Then, Kevin asked this question and “forced” me to stop and think about it for today’s report. Ahh! Happy Friday!

The first gun that pops into my head when I ask this question is the Diana model 27 rifle. It’s just such a simple, uncomplicated airgun that I guess it serves as my happy place. But as I think about it, other guns pop up. The Air Venturi Bronco, the Falke model 70, the Diana model 25 are 3 more that come to mind immediately. They all share the model 27′s chief attribute — ease of operation. In short, they’re all fun airguns.

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Bending airgun barrels: Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

A couple weeks back, we talked about straightening bent airgun barrels to improve accuracy. We want to do that so we can hit targets with the sights that were installed. There is, however, another reason for bending barrels. Some guns have sights that do not coincide with where their barrels are pointing, even when they’re not bent. For this situation, we also need a fix.

Many guns have replacement rear sights. I own a BSF S70 breakbarrel rifle that has a Williams peep sight that was either installed by Air Rifle Headquarters (the original company in Grantsville, West Virginia) or was a sight they sold for owners to mount. ARH did inform the customers of the necessity for the rear sight to have a complimentary taller front sight installed, and on my rifle that didn’t happen. I think this was an owner-installed sight that they probably hated ever since.

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What is my airgun worth?

by B.B. Pelletier

Today, I want to talk about something different. I’ve been reading two gun auction catalogs from the most recent Rock Island Auction, and something caught my eye. This auction was held last month, and it included hundreds of very desirable and collectible firearms. The first thing that I noticed was the low estimated prices of some really fine vintage guns.

For example, there were some first-generation Colt single-action revolvers that had a very low estimate. One was a Wells Fargo-marked revolver that had been restored to almost new condition, but it had a factory letter proving that it was indeed a rare Wells Fargo model. It was in near-mint condition due to the restoration. I knew that a restoration on a gun like this would lower the value greatly, but not to an estimated $2,500-$4,000, which was the auction estimate! I would have thought that it would still be in the $8,000 to $12,000 range, despite the restoration. And, if original, perhaps $15,000-$20,000.

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