Benjamin Maximus: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Benjamin Maximus
The Benjamin Maximus.

This report covers:

  • Pump incompatibility
  • Maximus barrel
  • Sight-in
  • The test
  • Baracuda Match 4.53mm head
  • Falcon pellets
  • Premier 7.9-grain pellets
  • Premier Copper Magnum pellets
  • What have we learned?

Today’s test has a lot of surprises. It should be good.

Some reports are more important than others and this one ranks near the top. Dozens of readers are waiting to hear about the accuracy. Today I shoot the rifle indoors at 25 yards.

Pump incompatibility

You may remember that I reported that my Air Venturi G6 hand pump is incompatible with the Benjamin Maximus rifle. I used the Benjamin hand pump instead, and it worked fine. I did some checking with both Pyramyd Air and Crosman and learned that both of them were aware of some problems. Pyramyd air has made some changes to their male Foster fill nipples, and Crosman just ordered a G6 pump so they can examine it. I think it’s helpful for all of us to know that these companies are working behind the scenes to make their products as universal as possible. That was the first surprise.

read more


Benjamin Maximus: Part 3

By Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Benjamin Maximus
The Benjamin Maximus.

This report covers:

  • First the pump
  • Left eye today
  • Premier 7.9-grain pellets
  • Crosman Premier Copper Magnum
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • H&N Baracuda Match 4.53mm heads
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Trigger pull
  • What’s next?

Today I start looking at the accuracy of the Benjamin Maximus. I have decided to run this test differently than my normal tests. Today I will shoot 5-shot groups at 10 meters off a rest. I will use the open sights that come on the rifle. I want to test those sights anyway, and this gives me a chance to do that. plus I start getting familiar with this rifle.

I also used the Benjamin Hand Pump to fill the rifle today, so I will report on that. I still cannot get the female quick disconnect Foster fitting on the Air Venturi G6 pump to fit the male fill nipple on this rifle, but the Benjamin pump fitting worked fine.

read more


Benjamin Maximus: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Benjamin Maximus
The Benjamin Maximus.

This report covers:

  • 2000 psi fill
  • First test — Premier 7.9
  • Test 2 — Premier 10.6 Copper Magnum
  • Test 3 — H&N Sniper Magnum
  • Test 4 — RWS Hobby
  • Cocking
  • Trigger pull
  • Overall evaluation

Today we look at the velocity of the new Benjamin Maximus PCP. I know I’m excited!

2000 psi fill

Like the Benjamin Discovery, the Maximus is filled to only 2000 psi, which means is it easier on air in all ways. It’s easier to fill with a hand pump, it takes less air from a scuba tank or other high-pressure air vessel and it allows you to continue to get full fills when your tank is below 3000 psi. Yet it gets the same velocity as other precharged airguns that are filled to 3000 psi and higher. It just makes everything easier for the shooter.

First test — Premier 7.9

First I filled the rifle and tested it for both velocity and shot count. I tested the Benjamin Discovery in January of 2008, and the .177 prototype peaked at 953 f.p.s. with 7.9-grain Crosman Premiers. That was the same pellet I used to start this test.

read more


The rise of the accurate pellet: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Crosman ashcan
  • Other pellets were similar
  • Competition improves things
  • Better pellets were needed!
  • Molecular level!
  • Crosman Premier!
  • Many improvements

Before we start, I have a couple things. Several readers wondered how I could see my computer screen while looking straight down. So I decided to show you.

This chair is offered by Comfort Solutions in Jupiter, FL. It was designed just for the operation I had and has a success rate over 90 percenrt, compared to 60 percent without it. I don’t want to lose my eye, so it was a no brainer. If you are interested, see it at www.facedownsolutiuons.com.

I initially rented it, but this chair is so comfortable that I bought it to use from now on. I will switch between an office chair and this one to ease back strain.

read more


Crosman 150: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 150

Crosman’s 150 looks plain and simple, but was a pivotal airgun.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Crosman 150
  • CO2
  • Benjamin 250
  • The birth of the 12-gram CO2 cartridge
  • Description
  • CO2 Powerlets leaked
  • More on the pistol
  • Test gun

Crosman 150

Today we begin looking at one of the most important air pistols ever invented — the Crosman 150. It was introduced in 1954 and had a 13-year run to 1967. The 150 is a .22 caliber single shot air pistol that has the same look and feel of Crosman’s earlier CO2 and pneumatic pistols dating back to the late 1940s. There was also a model 157, which was the same gun in .177 caliber. That caliber wasn’t as popular as .22 when the 150 was selling, so there are fewer of them around today. But that gun is identical in all ways to the 150, other than the color of the grip panels. When new the 150 was usually offered with dark brown panels and 157s were a mottled white. Over the years swaps have been made until today it is impossible to say whether the grips on a particular gun are original or not. The 150’s pistol grip is especially of interest as it has endured until today, in an unbroken line of more than 60 years! They got the grip angle right from the start and were wise to never change it. In fact, it is that grip that our guest blogger, Jack Cooper, keyed on when he selected the Crosman 2240 pistol for his pupil, Jill, to train with.

read more


Should I fix this old airgun?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Case one
  • Case two
  • Case three
  • Airguns are different
  • Is restoration ever okay?
  • Stradivarius
  • How does all of this relate to airguns?
  • So — refinish and rebuild, or no?

This question plagues collectors in every category — not just airguns. You have something that’s old and you would like to see it work again and even look pretty. Is it worth the time and money to do that?

Let me lay out three hypothetical cases that deal with the same model gun. I will be talking about a firearm — not an airgun, because the lines are clearer for firearms.

Case one

Case one — you own a Winchester model 1873 rifle that you would like to shoot again. It’s worn out, both outside and inside, and several of the parts must be replaced or repaired before it will work safely. In its present condition the rifle is worth about $550. Restored to working condition with a like-new finish it will be worth about $2,000. It will cost approximately $4,500 to repair and restore this rifle to like-new condition. That’s a job done by an expert restorer like the Turnbull Company — not a hack job that buffs out all the marks and rounds all the sharp corners on the gun.

read more


POI shift when changing the scope’s power

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • The last test
  • TX200
  • First group at 14X
  • Second group at 6X
  • Third group at 14 X
  • The final group at 6X
  • Conclusions
  • Summary

This report is an unprecedented final look at how the point of impact (POI) changes when the power of a variable-power scope is changed. I linked to the 3 earlier reports in which this phenomenon was tested (it wasn’t tested in the first report of the Aeon scope, but I included it for continuity). The scope used in today’s report is different, so we will see whether that makes a difference to the results.

I had no intention of conducting this test, but then reader Silver Eagle asked this:

Can we try this same test with a airgun that does not have the variable pressure that a PCP has?
An accurate springer such as a TX200 or similar would help narrow it down if it is the scope or the rifle.

read more