The rise of the accurate pellet: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Crosman ashcan
  • Other pellets were similar
  • Competition improves things
  • Better pellets were needed!
  • Molecular level!
  • Crosman Premier!
  • Many improvements

Before we start, I have a couple things. Several readers wondered how I could see my computer screen while looking straight down. So I decided to show you.

This chair is offered by Comfort Solutions in Jupiter, FL. It was designed just for the operation I had and has a success rate over 90 percenrt, compared to 60 percent without it. I don’t want to lose my eye, so it was a no brainer. If you are interested, see it at www.facedownsolutiuons.com.

I initially rented it, but this chair is so comfortable that I bought it to use from now on. I will switch between an office chair and this one to ease back strain.

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Crosman 150: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 150

Crosman’s 150 looks plain and simple, but was a pivotal airgun.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Crosman 150
  • CO2
  • Benjamin 250
  • The birth of the 12-gram CO2 cartridge
  • Description
  • CO2 Powerlets leaked
  • More on the pistol
  • Test gun

Crosman 150

Today we begin looking at one of the most important air pistols ever invented — the Crosman 150. It was introduced in 1954 and had a 13-year run to 1967. The 150 is a .22 caliber single shot air pistol that has the same look and feel of Crosman’s earlier CO2 and pneumatic pistols dating back to the late 1940s. There was also a model 157, which was the same gun in .177 caliber. That caliber wasn’t as popular as .22 when the 150 was selling, so there are fewer of them around today. But that gun is identical in all ways to the 150, other than the color of the grip panels. When new the 150 was usually offered with dark brown panels and 157s were a mottled white. Over the years swaps have been made until today it is impossible to say whether the grips on a particular gun are original or not. The 150′s pistol grip is especially of interest as it has endured until today, in an unbroken line of more than 60 years! They got the grip angle right from the start and were wise to never change it. In fact, it is that grip that our guest blogger, Jack Cooper, keyed on when he selected the Crosman 2240 pistol for his pupil, Jill, to train with.

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Should I fix this old airgun?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Case one
  • Case two
  • Case three
  • Airguns are different
  • Is restoration ever okay?
  • Stradivarius
  • How does all of this relate to airguns?
  • So — refinish and rebuild, or no?

This question plagues collectors in every category — not just airguns. You have something that’s old and you would like to see it work again and even look pretty. Is it worth the time and money to do that?

Let me lay out three hypothetical cases that deal with the same model gun. I will be talking about a firearm — not an airgun, because the lines are clearer for firearms.

Case one

Case one — you own a Winchester model 1873 rifle that you would like to shoot again. It’s worn out, both outside and inside, and several of the parts must be replaced or repaired before it will work safely. In its present condition the rifle is worth about $550. Restored to working condition with a like-new finish it will be worth about $2,000. It will cost approximately $4,500 to repair and restore this rifle to like-new condition. That’s a job done by an expert restorer like the Turnbull Company — not a hack job that buffs out all the marks and rounds all the sharp corners on the gun.

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POI shift when changing the scope’s power

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • The last test
  • TX200
  • First group at 14X
  • Second group at 6X
  • Third group at 14 X
  • The final group at 6X
  • Conclusions
  • Summary

This report is an unprecedented final look at how the point of impact (POI) changes when the power of a variable-power scope is changed. I linked to the 3 earlier reports in which this phenomenon was tested (it wasn’t tested in the first report of the Aeon scope, but I included it for continuity). The scope used in today’s report is different, so we will see whether that makes a difference to the results.

I had no intention of conducting this test, but then reader Silver Eagle asked this:

Can we try this same test with a airgun that does not have the variable pressure that a PCP has?
An accurate springer such as a TX200 or similar would help narrow it down if it is the scope or the rifle.

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The dawn of CO2 guns

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Invention
  • Marketing failure
  • Crosman Corporation
  • Shooting galleries
  • Post-war
  • The Crosman CG
  • Marketing misstep
  • From separate tanks to reservoirs
  • The dawn of the CO2 cartridge
  • The 12-gram Powerlet
  • Summary

Invention

The first successful CO2 gun was invented and produced by Paul Giffard in the early 1870s. He adapted the pneumatic guns he was already building to use this new gas and the guns he produced were operationally successful. But he failed to market the gun properly.

Marketing failure

Giffard made gun owners return the gas tanks of their guns to a central point where the tanks were refilled. And the customers stayed away in droves! Nobody wants to buy something expensive, only to be held hostage by the lack of a critical item, i.e. gas for the gun. In short, he failed because he didn’t provide the proper support for the gun.

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Crosman 1077 CO2 rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord, The Godfather of Airguns™
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

1077 rifle
Crosman’s 1077 RepeatAir is a classic.

This report covers:

• Crosman Premier Lite pellets
• Air Arms Falcon pellets
• Ran out of gas
• JSB Exact RS pellets
• RWS Superdome pellets
• Final evaluation

Today, I’ll back up to 25 yards and see what the Crosman 1077 CO2 rifle can do at that distance. I used a vintage Tasco Pro Point dot sight because, when I mounted the Tech Force 90 dot sight, it was angled too far to the right. So, the shots landed too far left. The Tasco was similarly skewed, but it wasn’t as pronounced, and I was able to adjust the impact point back to where I wanted it.

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BSA Scorpion air pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, The Godfather of Airguns™
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Parts 1 & 2

BSA Scorpion
BSA Scorpion

This report covers:

• Powerful air pistol!
• How the test was conducted
• The trigger
• Crosman Premier lite pellets
• The next big test
• RWS Hobby pellets
• RWS Superdome pellets
• Overall evaluation

Today, we’ll look at the accuracy of the BSA Scorpion. In a moment, I’ll tell you what this test has inspired me to do. But first, let’s look at the Scorpion’s performance downrange.

Powerful air pistol!
We saw in Parts 1 & 2 that the Scorpion is a very powerful spring-piston air pistol. It pushed pellets out the spout at the same speed as my Beeman P1, which is another powerful spring-piston airgun.

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