Schofield Number 3 BB revolver: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Schofield BB revolver
Schofield BB revolver.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • ASG Blaster BBs
  • Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs
  • H&N Smart Shot lead BBs
  • Center aim
  • What to make of all of this?
  • Evaluation

Today is accuracy day for the Schofield Number 3 BB revolver. Lots of interest in this one, so let’s get started.

The test

I shot from 5 meters. I was seated and the revolver was resting on the UTG monopod. I used a 6 o’clock hold for most of the targets and I shot 6 shots at each target.

ASG Blaster BBs

First up were ASG Blaster BBs. Six of them made a vertical group that measures 1.579-inches between centers. It’s a lot larger than I thought it would be.

Schofield BB revolver ASG target
Six ASG Blaster BBs made this 1.579-inch group at 5 meters.

Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs

Next I loaded 6 Air Venturi Copper-Plated steel BBs into the cartridge noses and shot them. Again, the hold was 6 o’clock on the bull. These BBs went low and a little to the left, making a 1.488-inch group.

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How a vintage BB shot tube works

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Technology
  • Gravity
  • Shot tube is the true barrel
  • The shot tube
  • What keeps the BB from rolling out the barrel?
  • A spring!
  • That’s all, folks

Today’s report was suggested by a question from reader 45Bravo, who asked, “How does the shot tube retain the BB then, if not by a magnet?” That’s a good question and I know if one person wants to know there are hundreds of others who haven’t asked, but also want to know.

Technology

Bear in mind that when the Red Ryder first hit the market around 1939, there were no rare earth magnets. They came along in 1966, and have been advancing ever since. So the question remains — how do the shot tubes of older BB guns work?

Gravity

They work by gravity. They work by the same principal that the magazine of the first Gatling Gun used, back in the late 1860s. Gravity pulls the cartridges (and the BBs) down, so all that’s needed is a chute to guide the ammunition to the loading/firing mechanism. It’s a little more complex than that, but not much. And it’s all mechanical.

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Daisy’s Red Ryder: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

Daisy Red Ryder
Daisy Red Ryder.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Daisy BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • H&N Smart Shot BBs
  • Baseline

Today we look at the accuracy of my vintage Daisy Red Ryder BB gun. I shot the gun with open sights today, to baseline it for the next test, which will be with an optical sight mounted.

The test

I shot the BB gun off a UTG monopod rest at 5 meters. I was seated while doing this. I used a 6 o’clock hold — resting the black bull on top of the front sight that was level with the top of the rear sight. The first BB tested was the Daisy Premium Grade BB.

Daisy BBs

You would expect Daisy BBs to do well in a BB gun made by them. Of course more than a half century separates their dates of manufacture, but today’s BBs are far superior to the ones of the gun’s period.

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Daisy’s Red Ryder: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

A history of airguns

Daisy Red Ryder
Daisy Red Ryder.

This report covers:

  • My gun
  • Today’s test
  • BB gun powerplant
  • Secrets of the BB gun powerplant
  • Daisy BBs
  • Cocking
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Feeding
  • H&N Smart Shot BBs
  • So far

As I told you in Part 1, I’m reviewing the Daisy Red Ryder because it’s a classic BB gun, and also because I have a scope mount to test when this basic review is over. Today we look at the velocity.

My gun

My gun is either a variant 5 or 6, but I can find nothing in the Blue Book that distinguishes between those two variants. My gun has a wood buttstock with the Red Ryder brand on the left side, and a plastic forearm. The rear sight is fixed. The cocking lever is curved aluminum and painted black. The rest of the gun is blued steel. Variant 5 has all those features and was made in 1947 to 1952. Variant 6 has the same features and was made in 1952. In 1953 Daisy started painting the metal and sometime around then they also started to make the buttstocks of plastic — which is variant 7.

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Umarex Brodax CO2 revolver: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Brodax revolver
Umarex Brodax revolver.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Installing the CO2 cartridge
  • Using the new eye
  • The test
  • Next — Hornady Black Diamonds
  • Umarex BBs
  • Daisy Match Grade Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • Bottom line

I think you all know how I feel about this Brodax revolver from Umarex. At first sight I thought it was odd-looking and even cartoonish in appearance, but after shooting it in the velocity test I fell in love with the feel. I said then that if the Brodax is an accurate gun, it will be a keeper. Today we find out whether that’s the case.

Installing the CO2 cartridge

This time I remembered that there is an Allen wrench inside the left grip panel to tighten the piercing screw on the CO2 cartridge. As always, I put a drop of Crosman Pellgunoil on the tip of the new cartridge and it sealed instantly when it was pierced. I was ready to test.

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Umarex Brodax CO2 revolver: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Brodax revolver
Umarex Brodax revolver.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Joke on BB
  • Daisy BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Umarex BBs
  • Smart Shot lead BBs
  • Other BBs fell out
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Overall evaluation

Today we test the velocity of this Brodax revolver. I installed a fresh CO2 cartridge and got right to the task. Remember, I’m writing this while looking straight down, and everything takes me twice as long, so please excuse my brevity.

Joke on BB

When I had to pierce the cartridge, I looked around my desk for the right Allen wrench. I thought I had misplaced it. Searching for things with one eye isn’t very easy, so I defaulted to a wrench from my tool kit. It was only as I was putting the grip panel back on the gun that I realized the Brodax comes with the wrench built-in! Duh!

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Air Venturi ISSC M22 BB pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Venturi M22 pistol
Air Venturi ISSC M22 BB pistol.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs
  • Long trigger pull
  • Daisy Premium Grade BBs
  • Radio interview
  • H&N Smart Shot copper-plated lead BBs
  • Realistic recoil
  • Shot count
  • Evaluation so far

Today we look at the velocity of the ISSC M22 BB pistol from Air Venturi. As small as the pistol is, it will be difficult to get a lot of velocity from it, because barrel length is important to a CO2 powerplant. Air Venturi rates it at 400 f.p.s., so let’s see how close they got.

Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs

First up were some Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs. Why not shoot Air Venturi BBs in this Air Venturi gun? The first step was to install a CO2 cartridge, which was straightforward. I used the combination tool provided to tighten the tension screw and the cartridge sealed just fine. Naturally I used a drop of Crosman Pellgunoil on the tip of the cartridge to lubricate the internal seals.

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